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A $4,000 Epiphone?


Cougar
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Are those models you named inherently better, that someone is missing out by buying a Frontier instead?

My argument since the Texan and Casino were revealed last year is that these are not for people who are happy buying $500 Epiphone guitars, but the people who are already buying Gibson but want these historic Epiphone models built to the same standards. This is actually slightly less expensive than the closest Gibson model, the Dove.

I’ve known about this a long time and played one last week. It’s a great guitar.

It’s odd that after years of hearing that the headstock doesn’t matter when people are defending their own Epiphone guitars, when an expensive Epiphone or three are introduced, suddenly there’s a question of why someone would want to spend a lot and not get a Gibson.

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Dove, Hummingbird, and those others are all short scale. if you want a long-scale maple body gibson, the frontier fits the bill!

It's also beautiful and a really unique look as opposed to a ho-hummingbird. To pohatu's point at this level i dont think anyone's confused by the epiphone headstock.

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2 hours ago, cunningham26 said:

Dove, Hummingbird, and those others are all short scale. if you want a long-scale maple body gibson, the frontier fits the bill!

The Dove is also 25.5", but the only significant (non-cosmetic) difference between them is the neck - maple on the Frontier, mahogany on the Dove. Otherwise, it's just a trade-off between inlays, pickguard, Dove's fancy bridge, and finish options.

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I think it’s great that Epiphone is restoring their image by having high end hand crafted USA made models in their line-up, again.  It will further establish the reputation of the Epiphone brand and in doing so help the reputation of the imported machine made models which have reached a new level of quality.   Martin and Fender have successfully had co-existing high end models and lower priced models with good quality and value in their success formula for a number of years now.   Martin and Fender buyers are able to understand the differences between high end and good quality with good value instruments.  No reason the  Epiphone brand can’t have success with  that formula, too.  Especially with their longtime heritage and sharing Gibson’s luthiers for the high end models and the great quality control they’ve pioneered and developed on their imported models. Just my opinion of course.

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

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It’s simply another option from Gibson, and I think that’s great!  Anyone with enough money to spend on this will inevitably consider it a Montana Gibson, just like anyone looking to buy a ‘60s Kalamazoo-made Epiphone knows, in reality it’s a Kalamazoo Gibson.  And quite correctly, market values reflect just that.

Bravo to Gibson for experimenting with the revival of USA-made Epis. 

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9 hours ago, bobouz said:

Bravo to Gibson for experimenting with the revival of USA-made Epis. 

The Texan must have been successful enough for them to move on to a more expensive option.

I probably won't buy a Frontier unless I see a used one for a good price, but I'll consider any other USA models.

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And if people don't like a $4,000 Epiphone, just wait for the USA Excellente.

In 1964, a Kalamazoo-made Frontier was $290 ($2,500 after inflation today vs. $4,000 for the Bozeman model). An Excellente was $570 - the most expensive guitar to come from Kalamazoo at the time. I'd expect a Bozeman Excellente to be $5,000.

Personally, I'd rather see a Bozeman Cortez or Bard before an Excellente, but they aren't quite as flashy.

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Love seeing all of these being produced in the USA. But how much tooling goes into the Frontier than the Texan for doubling the price. Granted, bound fretboard, fancier pickguard and solid maple, but I think the additional price is to keep it close to the Dove so not to push away potential Dove buyers. 

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8 hours ago, mgrasso said:

Love seeing all of these being produced in the USA. But how much tooling goes into the Frontier than the Texan for doubling the price. Granted, bound fretboard, fancier pickguard and solid maple, but I think the additional price is to keep it close to the Dove so not to push away potential Dove buyers. 

But at the same point, what makes a Dove cost so much more than a J-45? The J-45 (and on the Epiphone side, the Texan) are obviously much more popular guitars than the Dove/Frontier.

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  • 2 months later...

A USA Frontier is basically a Dove in a dinner jacket…specs are almost identical, bar cosmetics. 
 

Having said that, I’m a Dove owner and am very much GASing for the USA Frontier reissues!

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