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Gibson L-00 Standard on the way


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I pre-ordered the above from Sweetwater about 2 weeks ago and was told delivery could possibly be in May, but, most likely June.

Just received a call and it should be in my possession Tuesday or Wednesday!

I am geeked!

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  • 1 month later...

Cool and play the heck out of it.  The Standards are a nice re-intepretation of the originals.

But Gibson while I get the reasoning behind  those instances where you veer away  from the original specs,  why  would you  go with mini-Rotomatics on of all instruments an Advanced L Body guitar.  

Edited by zombywoof
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10 hours ago, zombywoof said:

Cool and play the heck out of it.  The Standards are a nice re-intepretation of the originals.

But Gibson while I get the reasoning behind  those instances where you veer away  from the original specs,  why  would you  go with mini-Rotomatics on of all instruments an Advanced L Body guitar.  

 

Same reason/s for not having a primo reissue L-00 in the new "Historic Series".......they build and sell new guitars and perhaps nobody has seen/played an old model?

 

BluesKing777.

 

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13 hours ago, BluesKing777 said:

 

Same reason/s for not having a primo reissue L-00 in the new "Historic Series".......they build and sell new guitars and perhaps nobody has seen/played an old model?

 

BluesKing777.

 

I would think it is a safe best that more than a few have not owned an original of whatever new model they are purchasing.  But Bozeman, like all builders, has their own ideas as to what sounds and feels best as well as wanting to avoid warranty issues which are a major drag on the bottom line of any company.   Then I guess you throw in cost considerations. I assume it is more efficient to go with the standard AJ inspired bracing carve Ren designed than what a guitar from a past catalog had.

The thing I love about Gibson in the 1930s  though is they were a far cry from the pragmatic conservative company Marin was.  They experimented with everything from soundhole diameter to body depth to bracing carve to the number of tone bars,  It is the kind of stuff legends are made from.  If you look at the L series flattops the H bracing of the 1920s had disappeared replaced with a tall thin non-scalloped X bracing.  And then starting around 1935 guitars like the L-00 started to get a heavier build which I assume was a move made to better ensure survival.   The J35 was all over the place structurally - two or three tone bars,  scalloped and non-scalloped X bracing and such.  But Gibson took everything they had learned about building a slope shoulder jumbo  and turned it into the J45.

In the end though there are only two kinds of guitars out there - those you like and those you do not.  No rule book for that kind of thing.

Edited by zombywoof
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10 hours ago, zombywoof said:

I would think it is a safe best that more than a few have not owned an original of whatever new model they are purchasing.  But Bozeman, like all builders, has their own ideas as to what sounds and feels best as well as wanting to avoid warranty issues which are a major drag on the bottom line of any company.   Then I guess you throw in cost considerations. I assume it is more efficient to go with the standard AJ inspired bracing carve Ren designed than what a guitar from a past catalog had.

The thing I love about Gibson in the 1930s  though is they were a far cry from the pragmatic conservative company Marin was.  They experimented with everything from soundhole diameter to body depth to bracing carve to the number of tone bars,  It is the kind of stuff legends are made from.  If you look at the L series flattops the H bracing of the 1920s had disappeared replaced with a tall thin non-scalloped X bracing.  And then starting around 1935 guitars like the L-00 started to get a heavier build which I assume was a move made to better ensure survival.   The J35 was all over the place structurally - two or three tone bars,  scalloped and non-scalloped X bracing and such.  But Gibson took everything they had learned about building a slope shoulder jumbo  and turned it into the J45.

In the end though there are only two kinds of guitars out there - those you like and those you do not.  No rule book for that kind of thing.

 

I had a quick look through the current models for mahogany tops - none I can see. Gibson are missing out on a craze for hardwood top guitars, budget models AND boutique. The shop here with a range of acoustics cannot keep the Martin 15 series 'hardtops' on the shelves, amazing really - and the 2 local makers sell bucketloads of acoustics made with the local hardwood, 00 and dread and jumbo. The singer songwriter groovers don't seem to be wanting binding or shellfish or plastic.

What about 2 new L-00s in all mahogany, tops included - one cheapie African mahogany like my 15 series Martin, but one superduper in ...Sinker Mahogany? Ha Ha!

 

BluesKing777.

 

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12 hours ago, BluesKing777 said:

 

I had a quick look through the current models for mahogany tops - none I can see. Gibson are missing out on a craze for hardwood top guitars, budget models AND boutique. The shop here with a range of acoustics cannot keep the Martin 15 series 'hardtops' on the shelves, amazing really - and the 2 local makers sell bucketloads of acoustics made with the local hardwood, 00 and dread and jumbo. The singer songwriter groovers don't seem to be wanting binding or shellfish or plastic.

What about 2 new L-00s in all mahogany, tops included - one cheapie African mahogany like my 15 series Martin, but one superduper in ...Sinker Mahogany? Ha Ha!

 

BluesKing777.

 

 I would be all in for say an Historic Series 12 fret,  25" scale  all mahogany L-0 especially if it had a 2 3/8" string spacing at the bridge. 

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On 6/24/2021 at 8:30 PM, BluesKing777 said:

 

I had a quick look through the current models for mahogany tops - none I can see. Gibson are missing out on a craze for hardwood top guitars, budget models AND boutique. The shop here with a range of acoustics cannot keep the Martin 15 series 'hardtops' on the shelves, amazing really - and the 2 local makers sell bucketloads of acoustics made with the local hardwood, 00 and dread and jumbo. The singer songwriter groovers don't seem to be wanting binding or shellfish or plastic.

What about 2 new L-00s in all mahogany, tops included - one cheapie African mahogany like my 15 series Martin, but one superduper in ...Sinker Mahogany? Ha Ha!

 

BluesKing777.

 

I agree.  Gibson could have an economical and eco friendly high quality mahogany topped guitar as could Epiphone, if nothing else.  Mahogany topped guitars have a certain warmth to them and amplify very good, and a certain well focused sound spectrum to them.   And, they look good.  I had to search high and low to find a used Ltd Edition Natural finish solid top Mahogany Epiphone EL-00 Pro (although there were plenty of sunburst mahog LTD Editions to find), so it was pretty clear that Natural finish solid mahogany topped ones had a demand.  Plus, Guild and PRS and Martin and Waterloo/Collings have their own line of solid natural finish solid Mahog topped guitars which get good reviews.  Gibson (or Epiphone) should get into the marketplace.  Natural finish solid Mahog topped guitars sound unique, are sustainable, and are an alternative to have in one’s collection…especially if they have Gibson-like necks.

Just my two cents.

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

Edited by QuestionMark
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8 hours ago, zombywoof said:

 I would be all in for say an Historic Series 12 fret,  25" scale  all mahogany L-0 especially if it had a 2 3/8" string spacing at the bridge. 

YES!

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4 hours ago, CJB said:

YES!

 

That Waterloo all mahogany 12 fretter you had was a ‘version’ of the vintage Gibson L-0 all mahogany. More chance of getting one of those here than a vintage Gibby, but they are scarce since Covid......Collings are only making a few Waterloos while they catch up on Collings order backlog with less staff..etc, etc. I had the Waterloo 12 and the 14 (all mahogany) in my hands a couple of years ago but didn’t have the cash. It has been a Needful Thing/s ever since. I would be pleased as Punch with a real vintage L-0 mahogany, but chances are slim here! 

 

BluesKing777.

 

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Unfortunately the all hog 12 fret Waterloo is one that I’ve not owned - I’ve tried but hasn’t worked out so far. The 14 fretter is a good one though but doesn’t have that 12 fret sweetness. As you say, one of those is more likely to show up  than the real L-0 over here as well. 

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