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Songmaker csr-ce


TheLogan

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Hi everyone, first post here on the Gibson forum. I'm looking for a guitar in the $1000 range, and am able to get a brand new csr-ce for $1100. I was just wondering your thoughts on this guitar. I am by no means a great guitar player, and am just wanting an upgrade from my fender acoustic. I want a guitar that will last me several years.

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Welcome to the forum! I believe its Gibsons entry guitar and made in Canada. If the guitar speaks to you tone wise and has great playabilty then its a great guitar. For 1k + theres some great guitars out there. Never a bad idea to play as many guitars as possible before taking the plunge. When I lived in Houston Fullers Vintage Guitars off North loop has an amazing selection of accoustics, particularly Gibsons.

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The luthiers at Bozeman Montana are making some very nice guitars. With present economy its a buyers market. I recently paid 1499.00 on 3350.00 msrp on my Hummingbird Artist . I never have played a Gibson I did not like, just like some allot more than others. Best of luck finding your new git fidl I am sure it will play better than you Fender.

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Actually' date=' thats where I found the csr-ce :- 40% off! unheard of! It's really easy for me to play. Do you think even though it's an entry level Gibson, it's still "Gibson" quality?[/quote']

 

The factory Gibson bought is in Newfoundland. It was/is the Garrison factory. Garrisons are not great guitars, so one has to think a Gibson made by the Garrison workers is unlikely to achieve the standard set by Gibson in Bozeman.

 

Still, if you play the guitar and like it, and if you feel the guitar is a good value, just make sure they do a proper set up so the action is right and toss you the first sets of strings.

 

Get a good tuner, and study proper humidification techniques here at the forum.

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Sorry, that is an absolutely impossible question to answer; if there was an objective scale for how good a guitar is, all rich artists would play the same guitar (namely "the best"). If you like it, buy it, and the name Gibson on the headstock will probably result in less of a drop in value if and when you want to upgrade (jeeez, what a sentence, bear with me, I am a Norwegian!)

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As Todd says, for $1k there are alot of guitars to choose from. For me at that price range I would start my search with the mid/upper Yamahas and Epiphone - would the Masterbuilt range be in reach over there?

 

Never played a Canadian Gibson so can't comment. The base Martins are worth a look too although personally, there's much better value around - see para 1!

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Has noone played the new Songmaker series. Do they have bolt-on necks and poly finishes now like Taylors?

I thought that the finish was supposed to be nitro lacquer...but I've read that the finish is now poly plastic. The look is very attractive and for a solid wood guitar with full gloss finish I would think that they should stand up nicely to Taylor guitars. Any experience here with these new guitars?

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There is very little to choose between the Canadian Gibsons and th entry-level 1/2/3 series Taylors, for me.

 

Both are very tidily finished guitars, and very "hi-fi" sounding instruments. I think the Gibsons have a bit more character, tonally, but the Taylors are perhaps a bit more consistent.

 

The beauty of Taylor guitars is that you can pick up a new 314CE in a shop Honolulu, have a strum, set it down, fly to London and pick up another one, and you'll get the same tone, the same playability and the same feel and finish from both.

 

Because of their CNC manufacturing methods and meticulous timber selection and finishing, they are probably the most consistent acoustic guitars on the planet.

 

I don't own one, but I do quite like them. I find, for me, Gibsons (Bozeman ones, anyway) have a bit more soul and character than Taylor guitars...if I wanted a guitar to play like butter and sound perfectly balanced and sweet toned, I'd own a Taylor. However, I like my guitars to be quirky, characterful and a part of me, and Gibson do that for me.

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I find' date=' for me, Gibsons (Bozeman ones, anyway) have a bit more soul and character than Taylor guitars...if I wanted a guitar to play like butter and sound perfectly balanced and sweet toned, I'd own a Taylor. However, I like my guitars to be quirky, characterful and a part of me, and Gibson do that for me.[/quote']

 

Yeah!

Jinder - you are completely right!

I purchesed your CD (the Mercurymen album "Postcards from Valronia") and now I am waiting to receive it from my internet dealer.

Gibson acoustics made in Boseman Montana are the best guitars in the known world.

Like no other!

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There really is no comparing a Bozeman Gibson to any Taylor. The construction itself is vastly superior in the Gibson. I was commenting that the Songmaker Gibsons sound like they are made using similar techniques that Taylor uses...poly gloss finish, bolt on neck...not sure if the Gibson neck is a one piece...but the Taylor necks are 3 pieces of wood. A $1100 price tag for the 314 or the Songmaker is good price for a well made solid wood guitar. Now the Bozemans are everything a guitar should be nitro lacquer finish, one piece neck, dovetail neck joint...ingredients for a fine fine gitar!

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Krasiparvanov, thanks for buying the CD! I hope you enjoy it, the whole record is drenched in Gibsons-an SJ200, two Hummingbirds, two Mahogany J45s, a Rosewood J45, a Custom Shop Adi/Quilt Dove, a Dove MC, a CJ165, an Epi F5-style mandolin, a 1968 B15, a late '70s SG...I'm sure there's more, but I don't remember! It's a feast of Gibson tone, anyway.

 

I hope you enjoy it. Let me know what you think!

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Krasiparvanov' date=' thanks for buying the CD! I hope you enjoy it, the whole record is drenched in Gibsons-an SJ200, two Hummingbirds, two Mahogany J45s, a Rosewood J45, a Custom Shop Adi/Quilt Dove, a Dove MC, a CJ165, an Epi F5-style mandolin, a 1968 B15, a late '70s SG...I'm sure there's more, but I don't remember! It's a feast of Gibson tone, anyway.

 

I hope you enjoy it. Let me know what you think![/quote']

 

I did not receive the album yet... I am waiting it to come.

I purchesed it from "ebay" because I can not find it in Bulgaria, so I am waiting the CD to come.

I posted your links to my friends. Everyone says "WOW" !!!!!!!!!

Because you are a great group!

And really a Gibson feast!

May GGG protect you for a long-life-playing & singing!!!!!!!

(GGG - Gibson Guitars GOD)

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The factory Gibson bought is in Newfoundland. It was/is the Garrison factory. Garrisons are not great guitars' date=' so one has to think a Gibson made by the Garrison workers is unlikely to achieve the standard set by Gibson in Bozeman.

 

Still, if you play the guitar and like it, and if you feel the guitar is a good value, just make sure they do a proper set up so the action is right and toss you the first sets of strings.

 

Get a good tuner, and study proper humidification techniques here at the forum. [/quote']

 

 

Hey folks,

 

new to this forum and I noticed this thread while I was online. I have worked with MANY Garrisons, and believe me, they're not my favorite guitars to play or repair, HOWEVER I would like to stand up for the workers. I have met many of them and have seen the these folks are good at their work, but it's difficult to do the right work under the wrong conditions.

Consider this: the Gibson Canada factory is on an island in the North Atlantic, so the humidity is hardly consistent... sometimes it's hardly there. Solid wood guitars struggle in the best conditions here... especially when speaking about certain brands that may have had some issues with an "ever-evolving" bracing system.

When talking about the Garrison brand, there were issues with the physics of the guitars... these were design issues, not production issues. Don't blame the workers.

The people at the Gibson Canada factory know their guitars and know their work. Often these workers know more about guitars than the people who claim to be professionals on the matter, and tend to be the voice of reason in a market concerned with bottom end and "end user" philosophies.

That said, I'm not a fan of the Garrison brand, BUT I'm a fan of the workers.

 

Have a good one!

 

L8erdaze

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