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Turned 65 and I'm Sure Glad I Called Joe Namath


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1 hour ago, SteveFord said:

Joe Namath, who now looks like a bleached prune, is happily hawking junk to seniors on old rerun shows where the advertising is cheap.


Oh, okay. 
I had to google that. 

Haven't watched television in quite a few years. 

Old Joe is looking, uh....     old. 

😗

rs=w:1280

 

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38 minutes ago, Big Bill said:

OMG!!!! If I see this commercial one more time!!! 🤬

We should be getting a bit of a break from Ol’ Joe.  I see where the same company has now dug up Jimmy “Dynomite” Walker to help Joe hawk their product.  Ain’t life grand.

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Congratulations on your 65th birthday!  You gotta spoil yourself with something special;  like a new guitar, or two.  And keep away from Joe, he looks too much like Dracula lately.

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Happy birthday BBP.   65?  TRADE YA!   I'll reach 70 in twenty days.  [wink]

I remember the first time I saw that ad.  Iwalked back into the living room from a trip to the head, and missed the beginning.  At first, I thought it was  MAURY POVICH!  [omg]  The look and voice are so similar.   And by the way....

What has anyone's ZIP CODE have to do with money back to their SS?  

 

Whitefang

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1 hour ago, Whitefang said:

What has anyone's ZIP CODE have to do with money back to their SS?  

These guys want to sell you an insurance policy.  If they do, you will then have Medicare and an insurance policy.  The insurance policy, most of the time, will pay your ~$135 a month Medicare because you make Medicare your primary and your insurance policy your secondary.  They get to sell you insurance that you essentially shouldn't ever have to need, so it is really big of them to pay your Medicare.  But it depends on your state.  Some don't allow it for whatever reason they feel the need to just obstruct and hate.

So there you go.

rct

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Well, I don't know about the state in which I live(Mi.) but being a GM retiree, I still had insurance coverage when I qualified for and got Medicare.  Just a phone call switched me from "traditionlal" BC/BS to what's called "Medicare Plus Blue cross PPO."   But it's curious that you believe it's "hate" as to why a state wouldn't allow that payback.

Whitefang

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4 hours ago, Whitefang said:

But it's curious that you believe it's "hate" as to why a state wouldn't allow that payback.

In the absence of any sense making, rational, reasonable explanation from any area that doinkers around with Medicare by making it as difficult as possible, I see no other reason.  If you know some rationale for such, by all means put it up here.

rct

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On 7/6/2021 at 11:53 AM, rct said:

These guys want to sell you an insurance policy.  If they do, you will then have Medicare and an insurance policy.  The insurance policy, most of the time, will pay your ~$135 a month Medicare because you make Medicare your primary and your insurance policy your secondary.  They get to sell you insurance that you essentially shouldn't ever have to need, so it is really big of them to pay your Medicare.  But it depends on your state.  Some don't allow it for whatever reason they feel the need to just obstruct and hate.

Ok so I used to do insurance verifications.  A couple of things: 

After you turn 65, Medicare is automatically your primary insurance.  That is not something you or your private insurance company can choose.  In fact, if your over 65 and a provider bills your private insurance as primary, the claim will likely get denied. 

Medicare Part B only pays 80% of ANY claim.   The remaining 20% is billed to your supplemental insurance and if you don't have any other insurance, you pay out of pocket (unless the provider chooses to waive the 20%). 

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24 minutes ago, ghost_of_fl said:

Ok so I used to do insurance verifications.  A couple of things: 

After you turn 65, Medicare is automatically your primary insurance.  That is not something you or your private insurance company can choose.  In fact, if your over 65 and a provider bills your private insurance as primary, the claim will likely get denied. 

Medicare Part B only pays 80% of ANY claim.   The remaining 20% is billed to your supplemental insurance and if you don't have any other insurance, you pay out of pocket (unless the provider chooses to waive the 20%). 

Ok.

I have to accept Social Security/Medicare at 62 next year.  At that point I could continue with my primary until 65, at which point they would be my secondary.  So there's my view of it and why I said what I said.

I have good health insurance, it's very expensive.  Lots of millions of people don't, they are the ones that need all the splainin, not me.

rct

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Yeah sounds like you're in good shape.    One more thing about medical insurance in the US - you are basically guaranteed coverage of some kind as an American citizen.  That's why I thought it was hilarious when Obama took credit for bringing healthcare to America with "Obamacare".   All they did was impose a fine to anyone who didn't have insurance, and created a multi-billion dollar website which was simply an online marketplace for all the same insurance companies you already know about, and all the same private rates.   I know because shortly after they rolled out that turd of an idea, I ended up in a situation where I had to work for a temporary staffing service and there was no insurance coverage.   When I checked the private insurance rates, they were not even in the ballpark of what I could afford.   So I went without insurance for 10 months until I could be hired permanently. Never got fined for it, but it still would have been cheaper to take the fine.  

The real "universal healthcare" in the US is a combination of Medicare (for those who qualify) and Medicaid.  Medicaid pays the 20% after Medicare.  The downside is, in order to qualify for Medicaid, you have to be in really bad shape financially.   That is your incentive to be a person who works hard and "contributes to society".  Those who don't need Medicaid pay for the people who do.   It's not a bad system at all and it has worked for a long time.   

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Happy Birthday badbluesplayer!

I saw a new commercial just today.  If you can't get a-hold of Namath, now you can also call Jimmy J. J. Dy-no-mite Walker.  If you need a reverse mortgage, call Tom Selleck.  At least Joe Montana is hawking Guinness.

I myself turned 70 on Juneteenth.  It took 70 years, but now my birthday is a federal holiday.  WOO HOO!

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My medical premiums went from umpteen hundred to about $240.00 per month.  The $240 includes $148 that they take from my SS check plus like $89. per month that I write them a check for.  Blue Cross Blue Shield Diamond/Platinum/Uranium policy.  👍 

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16 hours ago, ghost_of_fl said:

 

The real "universal healthcare" in the US is a combination of Medicare (for those who qualify) and Medicaid.  Medicaid pays the 20% after Medicare.  The downside is, in order to qualify for Medicaid, you have to be in really bad shape financially.   That is your incentive to be a person who works hard and "contributes to society".  Those who don't need Medicaid pay for the people who do.   It's not a bad system at all and it has worked for a long time.   

But not always all that well.  While caring for my wife at home I was told by one home care  service that my wife could get more frequent home visits from both nurses and doctors if I signed her up for "Senior Alliance", which meant she had to go on medicaid, which I was told she qualified for because they based her requirement on her income only.  And she did qualify by that criteria, but once supplying that information ,  the medicaid people never got around to contacting me.  Even after repeated calls and correspondence to them concerning the matter.  So "Senior Alliance" was never a reality for her.   Seems Medicaid was no better than most other home care services in that they're really good at having voicemail services that promise to call you back if you..."Just leave your name and number, and a brief message and we'll get back with you as soon as possible."  :rolleyes:  Sure.  The last time I called them was two weeks before my wife died and I still haven't heard back from them. [cursing]

Whitefang

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