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Wine Red SG special p90 conversion *pics*


blues_breaker

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Thanks for the positive comments! To finish off the look I really want to change the tuners to the white plastic buttons but I don't know if the tuners I have in mind will fit. -

 

http://www.wdmusic.co.uk/product/KLUSON_3_PLATE_PLASTIC_BUTTON_NICKEL_WD90NPP

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

edit - sg dude - the pickups are gibson p90 and i made a custom pickguard out of a sheet of 5 ply plastic.

 

demoryn - i dont know if you are referring to the tuners above but if you are I actually like them:)

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Very good job! Especially the pickguard. I love the sound of the P90s. But I don´t own a guitar equipped with them myself.

 

What´s it like soundwise? Did it turn out the way you wanted it to be?

 

By the way, I wouldn´t change the tuners. The ones that came with the guitar are quite alright.

 

Greetings

Kurt

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Kurt - The SG sounds brilliant with the P90s. They are somewhere between a strat and a les paul, but they distort much more easily than the strat's single coils and give a really dirty/gritty sound.While they still sound more 'twangy' than humbuckers. I really couldn't be happier with the results!

 

keep the comments coming:)

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demoryn - i dont know if you are referring to the tuners above but if you are I actually like them:)

 

Those were the ones I was talking about. If that's what you like, then go for it. There's nothing wrong with them, I just prefer green-key tuners. There's a set of nickel mini tuners on my Gretsch Jet, and I'm just not that partial to them, but it's all about what's comfortable for you

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Right someone tell me how you set intonation and 80LPC (not being rude) how the heck can you tell thats its not been set??

 

SG dude, first tune your open strings. Now fret the 1st string at the 12th fret and check if that is in tune. You might presume that it will be in tune because it is an octave higher than the open note. But as you press the string down to make contact with the fret, it increases the tension in the string which causes it's pitch to rise. To bring this note back into tune, the movable saddle allows us to 'compensate' for this increased tension.

 

If the note at the 12th is sharp, then you move the saddle towards the tailpiece. If the note at the 12th is flat, you move the saddle towards the neck. This process is repeated for each string. If an adjustment is needed, I detune the string (it doesn't have to be completely slack). This will make the screw easier to turn, and less likely to cause damage.

 

Higher actions require more compensation (lengthen the string) to account for higher string tension when fretting.

 

Gibson save time by setting the saddles into the 'staircase' pattern, and the bridge is fitted to the guitar. They are an approximation of the required saddle positions.

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SG dude' date=' first tune your open strings. Now fret the 1st string at the 12th fret and check if that is in tune. You might presume that it will be in tune because it is an octave higher than the open note. But as you press the string down to make contact with the fret, it increases the tension in the string which causes it's pitch to rise. To bring this note back into tune, the movable saddle allows us to 'compensate' for this increased tension.

 

If the note at the 12th is sharp, then you move the saddle towards the tailpiece. If the note at the 12th is flat, you move the saddle towards the neck. This process is repeated for each string. If an adjustment is needed, I detune the string (it doesn't have to be completely slack). This will make the screw easier to turn, and less likely to cause damage.

 

Higher actions require more compensation (lengthen the string) to account for higher string tension when fretting.

 

Gibson save time by setting the saddles into the 'staircase' pattern, and the bridge is fitted to the guitar. They are an approximation of the required saddle positions.[/quote']

 

thank you man!

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Nice job BB.

 

For anyone interested in doing this, you can see it on the Everything SG website.

 

http://www.everythingsg.com/howto/p90conv/1.html

 

If you want a pickguard made you can get a custom pickguard from Pickguardian.

 

They have done custom pickguards for me with the correct beveling and perfect fit.

 

http://www.pickguardian.com/pickguardian/

 

Note: In the conversion shown on the Everything SG website, the guy modified one of the Gibson P-90s to make them hum canceling in the middle position.

 

You don't have to do this- you can buy aftermarket P-90s that are already set up that way.

 

I have Jason Lollar P-90s in a Les Paul Special and they're hum canceling in the middle position, and they're better than anything that Gibson makes.

 

Also, you should not use an SG Classic pickguard- you will be routing into the neck joint, not a good thing on an SG.

 

The SG Classic uses a different pickup mounting system than other P-90 Gibsons- you will have to get SG Classic pickups or adapt dogear P-90s to fit.

 

If you want to do this make sure that you know what you're doing before you do it.

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Really is a fantastic job!!!

Nice job on the pickguard.

You really should share your process on making the pickguard with us.

Looks like the guitar came out of the plant like that.

I own a 2000 Gibson limited edition SG special.

I coil split an aftermarket 490T pickup on it, but really would like to try the p90's some day.

Has anyone heard the new P-Rails pickup thats out. It can switch between Humbucker,single, and P-90.

That would be the perfect pickup for me if only it had that gibson growl to it.

If anyone has tried them please share with me.

Rob

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