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Which type of 3M adhesive to maybe fix curling SJ-200 pickguard?


Jesse_Dylan
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My SJ-200 pickguard curls up some.  Gibson actually sent me a new pickguard, but it's exactly the same as the other one, so I'd imagine it would just curl up as well.  I know there's the hairdryer method, which would involve taking the pickguard all the way off, and using some adhesive on it anyway.  Would rather just stick something adhesive under the curling parts.

I saw some folks recommend a 3M adhesive sheet that Stewmac sells.  What other 3M stuff would work?  Aren't there flat little double-sided tabs I could stick under?  There are also rolls of tape.  But there are so many, I have no idea what would be good, or what could harm my guitar.

Here's the Stew Mac one https://www.stewmac.com/luthier-tools-and-supplies/materials/pickguard-materials/3m-pickguard-adhesive-sheet/

Here's the overpriced one I ordered (but can send back, and the process repeats) https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LWFO5R6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Help!  I don't want to get some industrial thing that will never come off the top of the guitar without damage (i.e. I want to avoid "super glue" of all types)

Edited by Jesse_Dylan
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  • Jesse_Dylan changed the title to Which type of 3M adhesive to maybe fix curling SJ-200 pickguard?

I used the stewmac stuff in your link to reattach mine, but I fully removed it, flattened it and put it back on.  Once I removed the guard, I could see the previous owner had the pick guard reattached also.

I don’t think there’s anything that’s going to keep the lifting parts down honestly.  The tendency to curl very strong. 

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Jesse, good luck trying to glue the pickguard back on. The point that you do not want to use industrial adhesives that can never be removed again I can well understand. I've had the familiar problem with pickguards coming off and rolling in on my J45 and Hummingbird, mine on the SJ200 VN is slowly coming off as well. On the J45 and Hummingbird, an authorized Gibson Service Luthier reattached the pickguards with 3M adhesive vinyl (exact type I don't know), that came off after 3 months. The pickguard of the Hummingbird I could not persuade with different "hair dryer" methods with additional ballast after heating to become flat again. In the end, it upset me so much that I ordered a new pickguard from MV Custom in Athens, Greece, and it's holding now. 

 

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18 hours ago, BigKahune said:

Good luck with your pick guard.

Here’s a curious bit - 

 

This is mindblowing!  I'll study it.  I'm a little scared to do it on purpose, now that I know what the pickguards sell for.  I wonder why the heck Gibson sent me a free one, especially when it wouldn't fix the problem.  But that gives me a spare in case I mess up maybe...!  I wonder if a person could just carefully yank off all the flubber off the top.  I don't think I have any separation yet.

4 hours ago, docr said:

Jesse, good luck trying to glue the pickguard back on. The point that you do not want to use industrial adhesives that can never be removed again I can well understand. I've had the familiar problem with pickguards coming off and rolling in on my J45 and Hummingbird, mine on the SJ200 VN is slowly coming off as well. On the J45 and Hummingbird, an authorized Gibson Service Luthier reattached the pickguards with 3M adhesive vinyl (exact type I don't know), that came off after 3 months. The pickguard of the Hummingbird I could not persuade with different "hair dryer" methods with additional ballast after heating to become flat again. In the end, it upset me so much that I ordered a new pickguard from MV Custom in Athens, Greece, and it's holding now. 

 

I thought about trying to get a custom pickguard, too--I'm broke, unfortunately!  Can't afford a luthier either, so I am my luthier (i'm learning a lot, I guess?)

I was frustrated, because Stewmac doesn't say which 3M they use.  However, I managed to eyeball the screenshots, and it's the 467MP 200MP, whatever the heck that means.  I think 467MP is the model of the tape/sheet/whatever, and the 200MP is the model of adhesive (or type of adhesive).  So I ordered a $3 roll of the tape from Amazon, and I hope it's the same.  I was not willing to pay Stewmac shipping just for an overpriced $5 sheet.  

I'm attaching a screen grab I took, because Stewmac changes their stuff, but in case anyone searches and finds this, here's the screenshot proof of what Stewmac sells or sold for this task.

I don't like Amazon, but a person can use that information and find versions of tape elsewhere, too, if one searches for 3M 467MP 200MP

Whether it will work, I don't know 😛  I'm thinking I can just stick some strips under the pickguard where it pulls up.   De-flubberization is also under consideration and might be really preferable when combined!  Or maybe without the flub, it would no longer curl.  I have a spare Hummingbird pickguard, too, and it's just been stored for 6 or so years--and it's curling too!  (I don't know how I ended up with so many spare pickguards...  Usually Gibson just ignores me, so it's odd they sent me expensive pickguards)

467MP 200MP Stewmac.jpg

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Hi Jesse- Good to see you circle back to the forum after all of this time. I'd seen your comments on some of the same music vids I was checking out on YouTube.

Yes- the 3M  467MP adhesive sheets are the ones I've used for several pickguard fixes (you don't necessarily have to pay StewMac prices). These sheets were especially helpful when Gibson was putting the 'guard over the rosette on J-45's. If you're going to do it, do it right- completely remove the p/g using naphtha. 

There had been some talk about how the nitro finish on freshly minted guitars was still off-gassing when the pickguard was applied, so you might now have a better chance of having your pickguard stay put. You really don't want it permanently adhered to the top-  the wood under a pickguard can really expand and contract (ever heard of "the pickguard crack"?) , so it's actually best that it's not completely cemented to the top. You'll want to remove the pickguard. To do that, stuff a towel in the soundhole, place a jar lid on top of that towel with some naphtha in it to keep the dental floss soaked and work the floss under the pickguard. No hair dryers needed. Clean the residue from both of those surfaces when the 'guard is removed. Even though the flat surface of the fretboard extension over the guitar top and the rosette on the '200 will help with alignment , you can use masking tape on the top to mark exactly where you want the guard to sit. I make rings of masking tape attached to the 'guard to put my fingers into to lower the 'guard- go r e a l l y slow just as the guard is making contact with the top, because these adhesive sheets are a one-take deal (they're cheap enough- buy an extra just in case). Good luck.

 

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