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New LP 2008 Traditional *without* PLEKD sticker??


SpaceAceOne

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Hi All,

 

I want to buy a 2008 Traditional at my local guitar center (in Germany).

 

The sales-guy unboxed one (from the original shipping box) but when he opened the snakeskin-case there was NO "PLEKD"-sticker on neither one of the pickups. This made me supicious so I did not buy it but reserved it until tomorrow.

 

Is this OK/normal? I thought *all* plek'd Gibsons come with a "PLEKD" sticker?!

Please reply soon.

 

Cheers,

SpaceAceOne

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I have an '07 Standard which came with a Plekd sticker, so that would mean that Pleking began in '07. My '07 Custom didn't come with a Plekd sticker, but when I contacted Gibson, they confirmed that it had been Plekd.

 

Whether it has or hasn't been Plekd, if it plays great and feels like it belongs to you, buy it.

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Hi All' date='

 

I want to buy a 2008 Traditional at my local guitar center (in Germany).

 

The sales-guy unboxed one (from the original shipping box) but when he opened the snakeskin-case there was NO "PLEKD"-sticker on neither one of the pickups. This made me supicious so I did not buy it but reserved it until tomorrow.

 

Is this OK/normal? I thought *all* plek'd Gibsons come with a "PLEKD" sticker?!

Please reply soon.

 

Cheers,

SpaceAceOne

[/quote']

 

Keep the receipt and if Guitar Center sold you the Guitar you did not ask for sue their asses.

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My '07 Custom didn't come with a Plekd sticker' date=' but when I contacted Gibson, they confirmed that it had been Plekd. [/quote']

Yeah, CS guitars don't have the sticker for some reason. =P~

I called to see if my 335 has been pleked since it's an '07, as well. Mine was built in early '07, right around the time they started pleking them, and they couldn't confirm if mine has been or not. Not that it matters...

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Don't lose any sleep over this. Plekking is nothing more than a cnc fret-leveling procedure. It will be 'obsolete' the first time you adjust your truss rod. Certainly don't let the lack of a plek sticker stop you from buying your guitar.

 

That is not true. A proper fret leveling is good regardless of where the truss rod adjustment sits.

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Don't lose any sleep over this. Plekking is nothing more than a cnc fret-leveling procedure. It will be 'obsolete' the first time you adjust your truss rod. Certainly don't let the lack of a plek sticker stop you from buying your guitar.

um...huh?

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Thanks for all your replies. I will pick up the guitar this afternoon and yes, I would have removed the sticker anyway. Nontheless I believe PLEKing is a great advantage (even if messing with the trussrod) so I really want a PLEKd one :-({|=/ (And I hope I don't have to mess the set-up anyway)

 

It's an ebony traditional LP made in 2008 and pictures will follow!

 

Cheers,

SpaceAceOne

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Thanks for all your replies. I will pick up the guitar this afternoon and yes' date=' I would have removed the sticker anyway. Nontheless I believe PLEKing is a great advantage (even if messing with the trussrod) so I really want a PLEKd one =D>/ (And I hope I don't have to mess the set-up anyway)

 

[/quote']

 

I'm glad you're thrilled with your guitar.

 

FWIW, however, the PLEK process isn't really a "great advantage" particularly when you're dealing with new instruments from a manufacturer who already does a good job on frets. Gibson to a degree (higher end models) and Carvin in particular do guitars that really don't benefit much from a PLEK job (as a new instrument) because there's really not much to be gained. They're already in great shape without the PLEK job. At this point with Gibson it's more of a public relations item because they've received quite a bit of flak about their quality contol, and PLEKing, for some people, at least, is an attempt to establish a baseline level of fret quality (in the eyes of the average customer) by associating with PLEK's reputation for precision.

 

Those that understand the PLEK process know that the process can be adjusted for those who have action preferences (very low action, slightly higher action, etc.), and that Gibson is setting up its guiltars for the same levels as they always have for fret jobs. If you really want the benefit of a PLEK job, you'll want to take the guitar in to someone who does it and have them re-do the job for your own action preferences.

 

The other time to have PLEK done is after there's been a bit of wear on the frets. For luthiers/repair people, it provides an easily verifiable way to get a good baseline level on frets that have been worn over time.

 

For new instruments from a reputable manufacturer, there's really no advantage, much less a "great" one.

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That is not true. A proper fret leveling is good regardless of where the truss rod adjustment sits.

 

Common sense, my friend. When you adjust the truss rod the neck moves. You either put some 'relief' in it or you take some 'relief' out of it. When you move the neck the frets move, too, and consequently the 'level' changes. Just think about it. It ain't rocket science.

 

If you put some relief in the neck the frets in the relief area are gonna move 'down'. If you take out some relief, the frets in that area are gonna move 'up'. Either way, they ain't gonna be in the same place they were before, right?

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