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Tip for storing glass slides


RBSinTo

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As my music teacher suggested, I recently bought a glass slide, as I'm learning the lead part of Clapton's "Give me strength".
The salesperson in the store tried to steer me away from a glass slide to either a brass or ceramic one because he had three glass ones break inside guitar cases, resulting in difficult clean-ups to remove all the shards.
I went with glass as my teacher's recommended, and on the way home, stopped at my drugstore and asked the pharmacist for a plastic pill bottle, the kind prescriptions come in. They come in a number of different sizes, and I got one that the slide fits in perfectly.
With the child-proof cap on, there is no chance of the slide accidently coming out inside the case, and being broken. Just thought I'd pass this tip along.
RBSinTo

Edited by RBSinTo
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I’ve got a Glass Slide that’s been in my junk Drawer for 20 years that’s never broken.. Good Tip! Is the Glass more ideal for the Woman Tone according to your Teacher?

I have Steel Slides too.. I don’t  think they create as much Sound & Tone as Brass.. So, I use Brass Slides.. 

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I have a glass slide, but rarely carry and flop my case around anywhere, so it breaking( and it's fairly thick glass) are nil.    And LARS-----

What the Hell is a WOMAN tone  in regards to slide?  Pretty insulting when you consider.......

The more well known slides were used to play what in earlier times was called "bottle neck" guitar, and of course, that was played by using the necks of wine bottles or long neck beer bottles of course made of GLASS.  I think too many music store salesmen are selling everyone a bill of goods.  Before you know it they'll tell you to hurry up and buy their brass slides because due to supply chain shortages the companies that make them will stop production!  🙄

Whitefang

Edited by Whitefang
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I really never play with a slide. Years ago, I came home from work at about 2AM. I was laying on my sofa and I turn on the TV. There was a show with some guy teaching how to play with a slide. I toss the remote on the back of the sofa and I get my Guild D-55 and a slide. I lay back down and start following his instructions. It sounded great. Then the remote slides (pun intended) off the back of the couch and puts a nice dent in the top of my guitar. But, I soldiered on, I kept following his instruction and I was amazed with the sound. The next morning I try to duplicate what I learned and it sounded like crap. I never really play with a slide.

Edited by gearbasher
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I've made several bottleneck glass slides. I tried a couple of times to scribe the bottle to make the break where I wanted it. But it was easier just to crack apart a bunch of empty wine bottles and choose the one with the best break. Then spend 10 or 15 minutes smoothing over the sharp edges on the stone back step. 

Since then I got a couple of metal ones. A chromed one and a brass one. They both have socket spanner/wrench splines inside. The brass is a better shape because it has the angled recess for the pinky. 

I only ever really used slides on acoustic guitars.

I only once improvised a slide on electric at a pub gig. I used my pint beer glass. It still had half a pint of bitter swilling around in it.  

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3 hours ago, Whitefang said:

I have a glass slide, but rarely carry and flop my case around anywhere, so it breaking( and it's fairly thick glass) are nil.    And LARS-----

What the Hell is a WOMAN tone  in regards to slide?  Pretty insulting when you consider.......

The more well known slides were used to play what in earlier times was called "bottle neck" guitar, and of course, that was played by using the necks of wine bottles or long neck beer bottles of course made of GLASS.  I think too many music store salesmen are selling everyone a bill of goods.  Before you know it they'll tell you to hurry up and buy their brass slides because due to supply chain shortages the companies that make them will stop production!  🙄

Whitefang

The OP is learning a Clapton song… Are you not familiar with Clapton’s well known Woman Tone? It’s a his signature Sound! It wasn’t an insult.. 

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Never heard Clapton's tone referred to as a "woman" tone.  This needs further clarification. 

23 hours ago, gearbasher said:

I really never play with a slide. Years ago, I came home from work at about 2AM. I was laying on my sofa and I turn on the TV. There was a show with some guy teaching how to play with a slide. I toss the remote on the back of the sofa and I get my Guild D-55 and a slide. I lay back down and start following his instructions. It sounded great. Then the remote slides (pun intended) off the back of the couch and puts a nice dent in the top of my guitar. But, I soldiered on, I kept following his instruction and I was amazed with the sound. The next morning I try to duplicate what I learned and it sounded like crap. I never really play with a slide.

It's why I respect and admire anyone who plays slide good.  I tried(and keep trying) to play at least halfway decent slide with no positive results.

I remember seeing comedian/musician Martin Mull do a blues parody using a small baby bottle for a slide on a ukulele.  Did one verse of a song he called, "The upper middle class white man's blues."   I remember the lyrics:

"I woke up in the middle of the afternoon;

Looked out and saw both cars were gone/

I woke up in the middle of the afternoon;

Looked out and saw both cars were gone/

I got so fed up and disgusted;

I threw my drink across the lawn!"  [laugh]

Whitefang

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Since I was a kid, I always loved the sound of a steel guitar. The solo on Jerry Reid's "Eastbound and down" is a great example of slide play that combines traditional gliss with staccato slide lifts and palm muting. But more to the point, I have always wondered about the slide used on steel guitars. To me, it looks like a hefty chunk of metal with a unique shape. As it is "held" in the hand, and not worn over a finger like the guitar slides I own, it seems like it has a "string side" and a "palm side". It obviously is effective for a steel guitar, but I have never seen one used on a standard guitar. Any thoughts?

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2 hours ago, Sheepdog1969 said:

Since I was a kid, I always loved the sound of a steel guitar. The solo on Jerry Reid's "Eastbound and down" is a great example of slide play that combines traditional gliss with staccato slide lifts and palm muting. But more to the point, I have always wondered about the slide used on steel guitars. To me, it looks like a hefty chunk of metal with a unique shape. As it is "held" in the hand, and not worn over a finger like the guitar slides I own, it seems like it has a "string side" and a "palm side". It obviously is effective for a steel guitar, but I have never seen one used on a standard guitar. Any thoughts?

Too heavy and awkward.

I have one for my square neck resonator.

I use glass for guitars, steel for square neck.

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