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Stupid capo question


powerpopper

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Ok, I feel a little silly asking this because I must have about 10 different capos, but here goes.

 

How do I know if I need a curved or flat capo? I never really had much of a problem with capos until I started using the G7's (go figure, they're more expensive). I also have a Dunlop Trigger type and Kysers and those seem to be ok. Shubbs are hit and miss for me. Someone suggested the Dunlop Victor or the Dunlop Cash, but how do I know...curved or flat?

 

I don't get it...:-

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Ok' date=' I feel a little silly asking this because I must have about 10 different capos, but here goes.

 

How do I know if I need a curved or flat capo? I never really had much of a problem with capos until I started using the G7's (go figure, they're more expensive). I also have a Dunlop Trigger type and Kysers and those seem to be ok. Shubbs are hit and miss for me. Someone suggested the Dunlop Victor or the Dunlop Cash, but how do I know...curved or flat?

 

I don't get it...:- [/quote']

 

Curved for steel strings and flat for classicals. Classical guitars have a flat fingerboard where steel strings have a radius. The radius varies from guitar to guitar but any curved capo will work for you.

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Radiused fretboards come in different sizes / radiuses and, it would seem to reason, some capos would fit one size radius better than others.

Having said that, I've never known any manufacturer to make more than one capo to accomodate different radiuses. One could reason this is because the resilent material used to hold all six strings against the board was sufficiently resilient to accomodate all boards. Maybe G7 is an exception. An expensive one at that. One would think the folks at G7 would have a fix / work-around for just your situation.

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You haven't mentioned which guitar you are using that has a problem with the G7th capo? I use my G7th on everything from Rickenbacker' date=' Fender, Gibson and acoustic 12 string with no problems. I use a flat Shubb on my classical.[/quote']

 

I should note that prior to using G7th capos (both the G7 and the Nashville), I had never had any muting, buzzing or whatever unless I was drunk and did not place the capo close enough to the fret.

 

The Nashville was pretty crappy right out the gate with my J-45. Maybe crappy isn't the right word. It just seems to take a lot of adjusting to get it right.

 

With the G7, I wonder if the issue is user error on my part because of the way in which the amount of pressure exerted is variable? I'm assuming tighter is better, but maybe not (and for the comedians out there, please, have a field day with that "wide open" opportunity...

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I should note that prior to using G7th capos (both the G7 and the Nashville)' date=' I had never had any muting, buzzing or whatever unless I was drunk and did not place the capo close enough to the fret.

 

The Nashville was pretty crappy right out the gate with my J-45. Maybe crappy isn't the right word. It just seems to take a lot of adjusting to get it right.

 

With the G7, I wonder if the issue is user error on my part because of the way in which the amount of pressure exerted is variable? I'm assuming tighter is better, but maybe not (and for the comedians out there, please, have a field day with that "wide open" opportunity...[/quote']

 

Just use enough pressure to allow the open strings to ring out clearly. Also put the capo right up behind the fret. I find the G7th an amazing capo for just this reason; you can use one hand to apply just the right amount of pressure. Strum the strings while applying with your left hand squeeze until all strings ring true. Works for me.

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Just use enough pressure to allow the open strings to ring out clearly. Also put the capo right up behind the fret. I find the G7th an amazing capo for just this reason; you can use one hand to apply just the right amount of pressure. Strum the strings while applying with your left hand squeeze until all strings ring true. Works for me.

 

Hey Drathbun, I'd be interested to learn how much retuning would you have to do on your SWD and your Yamaha 12 string when capoing at say the 5th fret?

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I use a Gibson capo - bought in 1975. It's flat' date=' still in good nick and works fine on my SJ200.

Don't know if you can still buy them - if not maybe I could sell for a small fortune.................but I never would.[/quote']

 

Did not even know there was such a thing as a Gibson capo, bhoy. If I had a small fortune I would offer it to you though...O:)/

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Hey Drathbun' date=' I'd be interested to learn how much retuning would you have to do on your SWD and your Yamaha 12 string when capoing at say the 5th fret?[/quote']

 

I don't seem to have to retune the SWD at all. Twelve stringers are always a problem, especially on the B's and upper E's and the octave G no matter what the capo.

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