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Famous sayings and there origin...


Flight959

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I noticed Neo used one in another post...

 

"Give em the full nine yards.".. or "the whole nine yards"...

 

Comes from the first world war... The ammunition belt on a Vickers Machine Gun is nine yards long, hence the saying "Give em the whole nine yards"

 

Bit of useless trivia for yall!

 

Regards

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"Go F#@k Yourself"

 

I think it originated in the early days of the internet back in the '90s' date=' during a political/religious discussion on a music related message board.

Of course, I could be wrong...[/quote']

 

Interesting, Bill. I heard it a bit differently, though. A man went into a bar and ordered a drink. The fellow next to him needed a bath or shower REAL bad so he tells him.."Cleanliness is next to Godliness...John Wesley"".

 

The other guy seems not to hear the man so he repeats himself.."Cleanliness is next to Godliness...John Wesley"

 

Finally, he can take it no longer and he shouts "Cleanliness is next to Godliness...John Wesley"!!!!

 

Whereupon the other chap looks at him and says "Go **** yourself...Tennessee Williams"

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I noticed Neo used one in another post...

 

"Give em the full nine yards.".. or "the whole nine yards"...

 

Comes from the first world war... The ammunition belt on a Vickers Machine Gun is nine yards long' date=' hence the saying "Give em the whole nine yards"

 

Bit of useless trivia for yall!

 

Regards[/quote']

 

 

And here I thought it had to do with Concrete.

 

Dial a telephone: From a time when phones had a rotary dial you put your finger into, then rotated to the stop and released. I haven't seen a phone you could dial in years.

 

Trunk of a car: From a time when cars had a rack on the back for mounting a trunk, or box like object for storage, to take your personal items with you on a trip. I haven't seen a car with a trunk on it on the road in years.. well maybe during parade season.

 

Drive a Car: Comes from a time when a team or a single animal was used to pull a wagon or buggy for the purpose of travel. You can drive a horse, oxen, hogs, sheep, goats, and such to pull a personal conveyance, but you cannot actually 'drive' a car. Animals need to be lead and coaxed in the right direction as they have a mind of their own, this is called driving, as in Cattle Drive. Cars do not have a mind of their own and therevore cannot be driven. Not sure the correct term, but I I favor "piloted."

 

Albums: Comes from a time when only one song was on a record i.e. 78s. In order to keep your collection of records, an album, much like a photo album, was designed with jacketed pages for storing numerous records. When the LP was devised, more than one song could be purchased on a single record, one could say, "an 'album's worth." Today we don't buy albums. In fact back in the day of LPs we weren't buying albums either. So, using 'album' to describe a CD with a collection of songs on it should be just as correct as in the days of LPs. (which are making a come back, by the way)

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that could ...."Freeze the balls off a brass monkey!"

 

A square shaped bracket used to store cannon balls in a pyramid formation on old wooden ships called a Brass Monkey... In arctic weather the cold would change and effect the structure of the brass effecting its shape making the balls fall off....

 

Sounds like bollocks this one....

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"Balls Out" refers to the early engine governor that controlled the idle speed of an engine. It was a spindle with two or more ball shaped weights that moved farther away from the spindle as speed increased. The balls were linked to the engine throttle. "Balls out" or "Balls all the way out" meant the engine was at max governor speed.

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"he's on his soap-box again." Comes from when preachers used to carry the wooden crate or box that soap was stored in to stand on them when they were preaching to the crowds so they would be a head above them - this actually started in London just down the street from St. Paul's cathedral.

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I remember it being said on either a TV show or a movie. ... the bit about the Monkey and a football. I don't think it was said about a foot ball game directly.

 

Full Metal Jacket, maybe.. some great quotes from that movie, not quotable here though. 95 percent within the first 15 minutes, which they say was largely unscripted.

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