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DaveinSpain And Other World Travelers...


Murph

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I'll be making a small tour of Europe next year (because of my daughters talent, not mine....) and have been curious about "little things", having never been there before.

 

Germany, Austria, and Italy.

 

We'll be with a group, transportation and lodging is covered, I was just curious about things like power adaptors, for DVD recorders, camera chargers, tricks about coinage, laundry, food, beer, gun laws (KIDDING....) stuff like that.......

 

Thanks......

 

Murph.

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Get a 120 to 220 volt Adapter at Wal mart to Bring with you, for Sure.

 

You Shouldn't Convert all your Money over to Whatever Country your in.

 

In Places like Italy and Greece and Germary, U.S Dollars will get you More

 

as Will a Few Cartons of Marlboro Smokes. They are With as Much as Gold.

 

And in Germany and Italy People Will offer to Buy the Close off your Back if

 

Your Wearing Levis/Gap Jeans and When you Go out to Eat, Tip-em a U.S.

 

10 or 20 Dollar bill right a way just after you order a Drink and You'll have

 

the Hole Place Kissing your Butt treating you like a King.

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Guitarest is right, to really enjoy yourself, you need to go native. Take the time to learn a few phrases of the local language. Making the effort goes a long way. Most Europeans speak multiple languages, to include English. But if you walk into a pub or Gasthaus, don't expect everyone to speak English right away, but if they see you butchering their language, but trying, they will usually switch on the charm and speak to you in English (after a few giggles under their breath). Also, I believe all of the European Union (EU), except for Great Britain has converted to the Euro, so plan accordingly.

Before going, you should watch Chevy Chase in European Vacation, and don't do ANYTHING he did in the movie. Europe is a lot of fun, take the time to see the big stuff, because you'll regret it if you don't, but don't miss out on the little cultural tidbits, like the castles, churches, breweries, small museums and... While I was stationed there, we went and saw all (or a lot anyway) of the tourist stuff, but the most memorable was the little local sights. Every town has something they are very proud of, and love for people to go and see.

And here is another little piece of info to remember; The evening meal is a big deal (particularly in Italy). They don't even start serving until 9:00 or 10:00 PM and you should not expect to get out of there before midnight. You can find fast food in the cities (McD's, KFC etc.), but why would you eat that (yuk!!!). Enjoy the local cuisine. Lots of fun trying new things, and remember when you go to Italy, pizza is not Italian, only some parts of Italy serve it. The meals are always huge, some sort of pasta dish will be served with your meal, but don't get filled up with that, because there is more coming. So start your diet now, you'll need the spare capacity.

Austria is one of the most beautiful places on the planet. Lots of little villes to explore, but make sure you see Vienna. Berchtesgaden Germany is definitely a sight worth seeing, both for it's beauty and it's history.

Man, I could go on and on. A great experience for you and your daughter, make the most of it. Enjoy!!!

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:D

 

That's weird.......

 

From a 14 year old kid.........

 

Hey' date=' it's a new World, eh?

 

:-k/

[/quote']

There's a class called new world. I took it last year. You learn about other countrys. Some fun facts. Oh and the nazi group still exists in germany.

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Back on topic.

 

I discovered that in Germany if you try and speak in their language it helps a lot.

 

As for transformers and stuff I don't know? I stayed with a relative who was in the army and he had transformers to use. Same as when I was stationed in England.

 

German beer is generally stronger and better tasting than American beer. However some micro-breweries are getting good... at least thats what I hear?

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OK Murph this is what you really have to know.... There was a time when the American dollar would get you alot in Europe. Those days are over. The dollar has gone way down in value, as of right no it is at 1 euro = $1,46. Shop around at home and see what bank will give you the best exchange rate. If you are going to be traveling just in Europe you will be ok with euros in most places except England. England still uses the Pound. I suggest if you go there change some of your euros for pounds, you'll get more for your money.

 

The electricity in all of Europe is 220 volts, but not every country uses the same type of plug. you can by an adapter kit from Radio Shack that will keep you plugged in every where you go. Check the power transformers and and charging units on everything that has one to see if it switches automatically from 220 to 110 when you plug it in. Most computers will work in 110 or 220 so all you will need is the plug adapter but be careful and double check before you throw on an adapter and plug into 220. Only takes a second or two to fry a 110 power supply. It probably is a good idea to bring a small 220 to 110 transformer too just in case you have any doubts.

 

The rest of your trip should be great... Don't be afraid to try the local food where ever you go. Try to stay away from the tourist trap restaurants, they will cost you more and not be as good. Ask around and find out where the locals go... You will always be able to find someone who speaks English in most cases. If you are in the city ask at your hotel where the locals go.

 

If you have never been to Europe before there is a good chance you might get a bug that gives you flue like symptoms, don't be alarmed it's not swine flue... The fact that your system has never been exposed to the micro organisms in Europe there is a good chance you'll get a case of Montezuma's revenge or better known as diarrhea... You'll get over it. Bring something from home like Pepto Bismol, the chewable tablets are very convenient to carry around. You might not even need it but just in case...

 

Other than that, pack plenty of clean underwear....

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If you are going to be traveling just in Europe you will be ok with euros in every country except England.

 

Nope! There's still lots of european countries that haven't changed their currency to Euros. The countries you're going to have all been infected with Euros though.

 

The electricity in all of Europe is 220 volts' date=' but not every country uses the same type of plug.[/quote']

 

True.

 

You will always be able to find someone who speaks English in most cases.

 

Older people are generally not so much in to foreign languages, but most young people are taught English in school.

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Nope! There's still lots of european countries that haven't changed their currency to Euros. The countries you're going to have all been infected with Euros though.

 

OK, I changed it to most places... Sheeezee...

 

You say that like there is something bad with the euro... The Euro Rocks!! How do you think I was able to buy all my guitars...

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