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Newbie Les Paul Owner. 2 questions.


opfreak

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Hi all. bought my first Les Paul (robot from sam ash), never had a guitar that was this expesive, or well made.

 

But I do have two questions:

 

1) I'm getting some slight fret buzz on nearly all the strings, just seems like the action is a little to low, but its very minor, and generally only happens when I play a chord. I haven't been playing in a while, so it might be me.

 

Is this common on out of the box guitars?

 

2) How do you pack the strap in the case? I never had a case that was so fitted, and dont want the strap to scratch the guitar at all.

 

thanks.

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To answer your first question, electric guitars do receive a factory setup, but that's only to make the guitar "playable" (to multiple styles) enough to try it out, so you WILL have to get a pro setup, as the action/setup changes due to shipping, weather, and being played in the store (where applicable).

 

Now, your case SHOULD (as most cases do) have a storage compartment (usually located under the neck rest. Just keep it in there, or get a gig bag, not the "case" type, but the kind you use to lug around all you misc. gear (like pedals, picks, extra strings, etc).

 

Hope this helps.

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Hi, Opfreak, I also own a Robot. When you own fine high end guitars, staplocks are only answer. They are on all of my electric and acoustic guitars AND mandolins (except the acoustic). I have Dunlop's new style of straplocks that are stable with regular straps as well as their staplock system. In case I forget a strap, I can interchange them. The Dunlops have never failed me.

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Hi' date=' Opfreak, I also own a Robot. When you own fine high end guitars, staplocks are only answer. They are on all of my electric and acoustic guitars AND mandolins (except the acoustic). I have Dunlop's new style of straplocks that are stable with regular straps as well as their staplock system. In case I forget a strap, I can interchange them. The Dunlops have never failed me. [/quote']

 

 

In other words, yes. :D/

 

Do take the strap off the guitar when you're done with it, and straplocks will both eliminate the worry about wear on the "button" area, and keep the guitar more secure while you're playing it. I too use and love the Dunlop straplocks, but most of the guys here swear by Schaller straplocks, so you've got more than one good option.

 

Oh, and congratulations! Please post pictures!

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O.K., back to the buzzing...

Every robot I picked up in the last week or so had

necks with zero bow (relief). A very minor truss rod adjustment

is all that would be needed to cure this common issue.

Pay for a "set-up" or better yet, get a book on how

to set it up yourself. It's not hard. Good luck.

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Hi.

It could be as simple as a neck adjustment, however, EVERY Gibson that I see [i'm a Luthier/guitar tech with over 24 years experience, with my own shop and I work at a GC on the weekends] is poorly intonated and can be set up to play "better"/to your preference.

As for straplocks...the only one that I use or recommend is the Dunlops.

The Schallers have inherent desighn flaws: the button comes loose eventually due to the strap part digging into it, and the strap part loosens up also...they need constant maintainence. I've seen many fail, sometimes resulting in the gtr crashing into the floor.

I've NEVER seen a Dunlop fail...and I've installed hundreds of them over the years.

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Huh?

Schallers have inherent design flaws?

 

I've NEVER seen one fail.

 

Button comes loose? Digging in?

Sorry, I don't buy it.

 

Considering that strap materials will compress over time, it's a good idea to use a socket and snug them up as needed, but constant maintenance? C'mon....

 

And if they somehow wear out (Not in the last 15 years for me) just get up off of $20 and buy a new set.

 

Maybe go talk to the "Weekend Expert" at your local Guitar Center....

 

:-/

 

 

 

Everything you need to know about installing Schaller strap locks is right here if you decide to go that route.

 

http://forums.gibson.com/default.aspx?g=posts&t=22183

 

Learn all you can about the various types and then decide.

Remember, plastic does wear out before you know it...

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Never seen a Schaller fail?

 

You can snug them all you want with a socket when you install them. The nut that attaches them to the strap WILL come loose - it's just a matter of time. I have been playing since 1985 - trust me. You may have a tech whose job it is to inspect such things nightly before a show, but in the real world, you will forget to check the nut on your own strap.

 

Ever since that happened to me, all 16 guitars in my collection were switched to Dunlops... including my Custom Shop Larry Carlton ES-335 and Custom Shop '67R Flying V. All future purchased/traded guitars will also get Dunlops. I use the newest ones - the hybrid that lets you use a regular strap in a pinch if you forget one of your lock-loaded straps.

 

I swear by them. My advice to Schaller is to replace that nut assembly with a snap ring washer like Dunlop. At least then you'd be 100% safe, as long as you have a pre-loaded strap with you, since their existing type is useless with a regular strap.

 

I do agree with the earlier posts, in that if you aren't familiar with basic woodworking/luthier concepts - let a pro install them as Dunlops require minor enlargement of the screw holes. To the guitar collectors out their who just fainted at the thought of drilling a Custom Shop model in even the slightest way - I say shame on Gibson for not installing them in the first place!

 

(As for the "they weren't on there in '59 so they shouldn't be on a reissue" argument, we didn't always have indoor plumbing, either. I'll save the best of my thoughts on vintage fanaticism for another forum.)

 

The only caveat with the Dunlops (and the Schallers, too) is they are a bear to attach to a thicker, premium strap such as Levy's top-of-the-line padded model. With much fiddling they eventually do fit, and I suggest using vise-grip type pliers to compress the strap and washer assembly while getting the snap ring to engage.

 

Now I need to argue with a friend who claims he's NEVER had a strap slip on a standard factory button. If I can only remember what planet he's on...

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my 'fear' with strap locks is the unscrewing & rescrewing' date=' afraid i'd somehow ruin the wood.[/quote']

 

Aaaaah, the thing is, with strap locks, you don't unscrew anything to take the starp off- depending on the brand and model, you either press a little button or pull a toggle or some similar mechanical action, and the strap-lock disengages and pops off the button easily. Then you repeat/reverse the procedure when putting the strap back on. No fuss, no muss, no wear and tear.

 

The wood-screw that holds the button on the body is a permanent but fairly easily reversible installation; it's installed, and you forget about it.

 

As for the hardware on the strap coming loose, like on Schallers and possibly others, they can, do, and will, -BUT- a tiny little dab of blue or red Loctite thread-locker properly applied to the threads before a good tightening-down (but not over-tight! Don't damage the threads or nuts!) is all you have to do to prevent that. I've had a set of the Schallers on one guitar and its strap for years and years and years and it's never, ever shown any signs of loosening since I applied the Loctite.

 

I prefer the low-profile design of the Dunlop Straploks, and their strap-mounting hardware is far less likely to come loose than that of the Schallers (barring using Loctite on the Schallers), but the Scallers do have one potential advantage- if you have their horseshoe shaped button-holding "cups" or "stirrups" oriented so that their open-end will be facing upward WHEN THE GUITAR IS IN PLAYING POSITION, they will likely still hold up the guitar in an accidental release or failure of the strap-lock toggle.

 

On any metal, mechanical strap-lock device, you may occasionally get squeaking noises ringing through the guitar, pickups, amp and speakers as the strap-locks squeak when the guitar moves around hung on its strap. I've found that a little dab of clear Teflon gel lube- like the Archer-brand stuff sold by Radio Shack in pen-like tube/dispensers- will stop the squeaks and stay put, and its being clear prevents unwanted smudges or stains where you don't want the stuff.

 

Snap-ring pliers, or small needle-nose pliers carefully used in a similar way, can help with installing those Dunlop Straploks.

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Loctite thread-locker properly applied to the threads before a good tightening-down (but not over-tight! Don't damage the threads or nuts!) is all you have to do to prevent that.

 

Scallers do have one potential advantage- if you have their horseshoe shaped button-holding "cups" or "stirrups" oriented so that their open-end will be facing upward WHEN THE GUITAR IS IN PLAYING POSITION' date=' they will likely still hold up the guitar in an accidental release or failure of the strap-lock toggle.

 

On any metal, mechanical strap-lock device, you may occasionally get squeaking noises ringing through the guitar, pickups, amp and speakers as the strap-locks squeak when the guitar moves around hung on its strap. I've found that a little dab of clear Teflon gel lube- like the Archer-brand stuff sold by Radio Shack in pen-like tube/dispensers- will stop the squeaks and stay put, and its being clear prevents unwanted smudges or stains where you don't want the stuff. [/quote']

 

Excellent advice, I couldn't agree more!

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Hiya

 

NEVER leave the strap attached to the guitar - especially if it is leather. Many straps will affect the finish of your guitar over time (in much the same way as many stands will). This is especially important if the guitar has a nitro cellulose finish (I'm not sure what finish a robot has - metallic?!!)

 

Cheers

 

Andy

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Huh?

Schallers have inherent design flaws?

 

Yup...as I stated previously

 

I've NEVER seen one fail.

 

I've seen dozens of them fail' date=' often with disasterous results!

i've a drawer full of them in my shop from removing them and installing the Dunlops

 

Button comes loose? Digging in?

 

From the strap part rotating around, eventually it digs into the plating on the button, and the screw in the wood comes loose.

 

Sorry, I don't buy it.

 

Hey, whatever works for you...

 

Considering that strap materials will compress over time, it's a good idea to use a socket and snug them up as needed, but constant maintenance? C'mon....

 

You can't get leather or webbed material that tight...

 

And if they somehow wear out (Not in the last 15 years for me) just get up off of $20 and buy a new set.

 

Sure thing...right after one comes off, and your guitar crashes to the ground resulting in a brokern headstock...

 

Maybe go talk to the "Weekend Expert" at your local Guitar Center....

 

=D>/

 

Ya know...just because you don't agree is no reason to get snotty about it...

 

 

 

Everything you need to know about installing Schaller strap locks is right here if you decide to go that route.

 

http://forums.gibson.com/default.aspx?g=posts&t=22183

 

Ok Mr Schaller straplock expert!

 

Now to me, this is a lot of hoops to jump through just to attach a freekin strap pin.

You obviously have lots of time on your hands...

 

Learn all you can about the various types and then decide.

Remember, plastic [i']does[/i] wear out before you know it...

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