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New to guitar, what to do...


Thundergod

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For a young person who isn't really sure they want to "pay the dues" to be a picker, I see nothing at all wrong with a starter-pack. It's generally a decent instrument and accessories for a very reasonable initial outlay of hard-earned $$. If interest wanes, it's no great loss to sell or even donate the stuff.

 

For an older, more experienced person who knows himself better, and has his/her own disposable income, if they've always wanted to play guitar and can afford to start out on a more advanced, sophisticated model...or even something that just looks nicer; why not go for the gusto? Nicer instruments are definitely more enjoyable to play, thus more conducive to good practice habits.

 

Both ways have their good points. How's that for ambiguity? :-

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If you're just starting out, the smarter thing to do would be to buy a starter guitar/amp pack. So I voted for that.

 

However...

 

There are a lot of people that go in and buy a Les Paul Custom, and some nice tube amp, because they think that if it costs more, it's going to make them play better. That's cool too. -Those are the people that players like us count on to get tired of playing (or never learn to play) and then sell their gear for cheap. I mean if it wasn't for guys like that, there would be way less mint condition vintage amps and guitars. :-

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Starter pack.

I think if you learn on a high end guitar' date=' you won't appreciate a higher end guitar. Like 16 kids driving dad's Infinity or BMW.

I played nothing but a Squire Strat for like 10 years and let me tell, the first time I picked up a Gibson, I was blown away.[/quote']

 

My thoughts exactly!

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I can only speak for myself...but when I was 16(just after WW II...LOL)there were no starters packs, and I dreamt of a guitar my heroes were playing, so I went working during summer holiday to earn my first Gibson Les Paul Standard, and I can tell you that I cherished this guitar from the moment I laid my hands on her. True, I start playing the guitar when I was 9, but that LP was my very first great guitar. So, if my son wants a great electric guitar and he knows how to play it already he can get that great guitar, ...just have to work for it... No offense to starters packs though, but If your mind is focused on a Gibson, work for that Gibson!

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When I startd playing I bought myself a cheap guitar and a cheap amplifier. No starter packs were available at the time, those are a newer developement. I wish I had started with a nice guitar starting with a starter pack disencouraged me and I went 5 years without playing that guitar

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"If you're serious about becoming a No-Nonsense Guitarist, buy a Good but not Great, Starter Kit (Epi Les Paul, Fender Strat [not Squier]), and get yourself a Crappy Acoustic with extremely high action.

 

Learn on that Acoustic and switch to the electric. The difficulty you have playing the Crappy Acoustic will translate into Powerful Finger Muscles. It's the Boot Camp approach.

 

Look at it like hiking. If you get yourself the lightest weight back pack and best hiking boots in Big5, you'll discover that Back Packs are heavy and hiking makes your feet hurt. Doesn't matter how good your stuff is. However, get yourself some Surplus Boots and an Alice Pack, you can find out that Back Packs are heavy and hiking hurts your feet for a lot cheaper. If you still like the activity, get yourself the Best Big5 stuff, and you'll appreciate how much less your feet hurt, and how much Lighter (not light) your better back pack is."

 

[i said this in a different thread, but I think it's more appropriate here]

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Starter pack.

I think if you learn on a high end guitar' date=' you won't appreciate a higher end guitar. Like 16 kids driving dad's Infinity or BMW.

I played nothing but a Squire Strat for like 10 years and let me tell, the first time I picked up a Gibson, I was blown away.[/quote']

 

I agree with Are Nine. If you can learn on an inexpensive guitar, then playing a better guitar will even be easier. And, you will appreciate the better guitar and amp better if you start out low. Kind of like paying your dues before you get to the big time.

 

Not to mention the fact that if you happen to not like it in the beginning, you haven't lost too much money.

 

Exactly what I did with my twins. One kept with guitar and upgraded. The other switched to bass and also upgraded.

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When I first picked up my lp I was completley blown away.... The strings were ten years old but I could still feel how much of a better guitar it was then my cruddy starter guitar. I the strings broke pretty quick but I was in love anyway.... It sounded better acoustically with ten yr old strings then my starter did electrically.

 

Buying a starter pack makes you appreciate the quality of higher end guitars much more than if you start on them.

 

I get kind of annoyed when I see a snobby 17 yr old driving a BMW and swerving spastically. Like gettin an LP standard and fumbling over every not.

 

The guys who stick with it when beginning with a nice guitar turn out just as good as your average player... but (sometimes) with a little bit less respect for the quality and sound of the instrument.

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well maybe i'm going out on a limb here ...but i think you should buy the best instrument you can afford.

a well made guitar will last longer and be easier to play and probably stick with you for many years.

a good guitar will greatly enhance your enjoyment of playing too!

which probably means you will stick with it, rather than give up in frustration like many do.

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well maybe i'm going out on a limb here ...but i think you should buy the best instrument you can afford.

a well made guitar will last longer and be easier to play and probably stick with you for many years.

a good guitar will greatly enhance your enjoyment of playing too!

which probably means you will stick with it' date=' rather than give up in frustration like many do.

 

[/quote']

its all your opinion... I see the merits of getting a great guitar first.

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Kid?

 

Starter pack.

Upgrading to new gear should be tied to progress made in playing ability.

I encourage parents to spend money on good gear if the kid wants to play.

 

Adults?

Harder to say.

Good gear will ALWAYS be worth money.

If you never play that Les Paul Custom and Marshall you can use it as poser art.

 

:D/

 

Seriously, when somebody pulls a 25 year old LP and Marshall out of the closet and gets them appraised...

You could then keep them as a treasure or be an idiot and sell them for a quick buck.

 

You can't sell Chinese guitars for sh!t - ever.

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Kid? Starter pack for sure. If they stick to it - step 'em up to something better

 

If a grown up is intent on starting on electric instead of acoustic, I'd say buy a decent amp and an inexpensive guitar and upgrade the pickups and potentiometers - either now or later. You can get 80% of the same sound out of a Squire Strat or Epiphone Les Paul as long as it has good electronics and is set up decently.

 

That said, the magic lies in that next 20% - but you don't need that starting out. Once your ear has grown with your abilities you can spend thousands of dollars on that next 20%!

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