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I need accoustic players' input please


GibsonByBirth

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I am a Gibson in name and brand preference. However I am not very knowledgable about accoustics. I have two Ovation solid body guitars on greg's list for $1000 for the pair. I am not getting any serious takers even though they are underpriced vintage from the late 70's. I have been offered the 1991 Ovation 5868 accoustic pictured below. It is vauled about $1000. What opinions do you have on the trade and what do you think about Ovation accoustics in general?

 

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I meet with the guy this Saturday 17th or Sunday18th.

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Never was a really big fan of ovations.. It really all depends on your style of play. If you want something for contemp look at a Taylor or Japanese make.. If you are looking for amazing tone that sounds unique, nothing beats a Gibson. Play what you find and keep what you like. You can find some really nice Gibson's for around 1000. For instance, I think my CL-30 was labeled at 1500 and it was mint. If you found a private seller they may go cheaper. Don't settle for anything less than what you want. If you do then you'll end up with something you regret every time you play. Good luck!

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To chime in with Kebob..... I was never fond of the Ovation. I have owned a couple over the years and even though one had a decent sound, seemed

always they were very uncomfortable to play. They felt as though they wanted to roll away unless it was a shallow body. But still just wasn't comfortable IMHO.

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I have mixed feelings about them. I have three, a 70s US Applause that I bought on ebay as a basket case for $12. I basically had to rebuild the shattered top and spent a great deal of time crowning the aluminum 'frets'. Great guitar.....now. Another is an oddball that Ovation made in the late 70s with a 12 fret aluminum neck and plastic top. The only wood on the guitar is the bridge. It's called an Academy and was targeted to the student market. I don't think many were made or sold but conceptually I think the idea is great; bulletproof yet functional. It has a huge hollow boomy tone. It has a growing cult following within the Ovation community but would probably be laughed at if brought to a jam session (until it was strummed). The latest is a run of the mill '79 Balladeer that is as plain and common as white bread. The factory finish on the top is white that has yellowed (jaundiced?). It has had one ugly repair done on the top and I am slowly mentally preparing myself to refinish it. I had notions of painting it some wild color like purple metallic but I will likely go with the original white; there's something striking about a white topped Ovation; they look sharp contrasted by the black bowl and black neck. The neck shape and action make you think you're playing an electric. They have their own tone altogether and I've never felt comfortable trying to compare them to a Gibson.

 

That one was bought on ebay with the original hard shell case for $86. I guess that's part of the appeal, the fact that an American guitar with good tone and playability can be bought on the cheap.

 

A lot of people don't like the round bowl because they slide off your lap. I agree 100%. However they have felt self adhesive pads that go in the treble side of the waist and they work well. Straps help too, if you're sitting down with one. It's all a trade off I guess.

 

I am an Ovation fan for many reasons but I would never compare them to a Gibson, Martin, or 'fill in the blank'. They're a whole different breed of cat and have their merit as such. To my knowledge the Connecticut factory is still running, in fact they're making Guilds there now, but I'm betting Fender will move them to China in time.

 

I don't think I could, in good conscience, spend over a few hundred bucks on an Ovation; there's just flat too many of them out there cheap. They're not a good investment at this point.

 

P.S. the avatar is of the assembly line at Moosup, CT in the 70s; plywood topped Applauses being born. A cool shot regardless of the brand.

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I agree 100% with Ksdaddy.

Have played several Ovations in my life.

What I saw is that plugged in they had a great tone.

When I was young I was very impressed by the plastic back.

Not now....

If you need a guitar to carry here & there in the trunk of the car - well it is the Ovation.

If I should give 1000$ - it will not be for an Ovation.

And I repeat - have mixed feelings but most of those feelings are positive towards the Ovation

 

And another thing - you call yourself "GibsonByBirth"

So why don't you get a Gibson acoustic?

I'd suggest you a SJ 200 - there is not a mistake!

 

I'd buy a solid wood guitar.

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My reason for considereding this guiutar is it's all of any value that I've been offered for my Ovation solidbodies.

 

Thanks for the input. For what I gathered is Ovations are uncomfortable and not worth the amount dealing with here. Since this trade would have involved alot of driving for me, I'll call it off. I also didn' t know Gibsons could be had at around $1000.

 

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My solidbodies

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A Viper and a Preacher, clean and unmolested? You should be able to snag $500 each on ebay quite easily. I've seen them go for less but they generally had aftermarket humbuckers nailed into them or other heinous transgressions.

 

It's not easy to find a Gibson for $1000 but can be done. It's all in what you're looking for. If you like square shoulder dreadnaughts, the 90s J30 and Gospel can usually be found for $700 or $800 easy enough. They're fine guitars, they just don't grab as much of the market as some. If you want a round shoulder, it might be a little harder. You might find a WM-45 under $1000.

Of course I say that and every Gospel will be priced at $1500 and there will be a dozen J45s for $899, but I'm going by past exp. Sometimes 70s Gibsons can be had cheap but you'd better have a luthier maven on retainer so you can avoid structural issues; the cost of repair could offset any short term bargain.

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I always take an Ovation with me when I canoe or kayak in case I lose an oar the Ovation takes it's place.

 

Now see' date=' that's a [i']good[/i] thing! Music plus a practical use!

 

And if it gets destroyed, it makes a dandy potato salad bowl for large gatherings. A shallow bowl could be for picante sause I suppose.

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To me...my opinion, only...is that the time has simply passed for Ovations. They were at one time a great way to have an amplified acoustic guitar. They might have done this better than all the rest in the 70's. However, there is now so many finely developed acoustic guitars with pickups as well as undersaddle or soundhole acoustic pickups that are out there (and frankly better than the old Ovations when amped)...that, the time for Ovations being what they once were in the hierarchy of guitars has passed. Again, just my opinion.

 

QM

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Ya man, it may take some time to find one.. But I'm sure you could grab a CL-20/25 for around 1k. Also, if you are ok with a Canadian Gibson, the Songmaker series sits around 1k NEW. And I hear they are Taylor'esque in tone.. Kind of up to what you want but I'd wait for a CL to come along.. Great guitars!

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I agree with QuestionMark 100%. The only defense I would offer is that, think about when O's were at their peak in popularity.... late 70s, early 80s. Think about what Gibson and Martin were putting out at that time. And there may have been some good Japanese acoustics then but they were in the minority and still had the Japanese junk stigma attached.

 

I can't say there was a 'golden age' of Ovations but the ones I've played that stood above the rest were all made in the late 70s/early 80s, so that adds even more ammo.

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I traded else where for a Peavey Classic 50/410 Guitar Combo Amplifier (50 Watts, 4x10 in.)12AX7 and four EL84 tubes. 3-band passive EQ. Four 10 in. Blue Marvel speakers. Priced around $1000. He also threw in an Epiphone proline EM-10. I thinkit was a better deal. What do you think?

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