Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Chiseen

The Best Combination of Two Guitars?

Recommended Posts

Brother' date=' Lennon was everything. You realize a lot of the leads on the later albums were Lennon, right? Both he and Harrison had tasty skills.

[/quote']

I agree, but I'm thinking of the Beatles from 1963 to 1966, man that combination was dead on. Lennon's rhythm playing was solid, just solid. You can drop the drum track and his driving guitar style will carry the band.

Then there was the mix of the voices...again the best....And to think they did it all on a Sony 4 track tape recorder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree' date=' but I'm thinking of the Beatles from 1963 to 1966, man that combination was dead on. Lennon's rhythm playing was solid, just solid. You can drop the drum track and his driving guitar style will carry the band.

Then there was the mix of the voices...again the best....And to think they did it all on a Sony 4 track tape recorder.

[/quote']

 

Maybe Lennon had to be, since Ringo was "adequate". Have you seen Zac Starkey play? More like Keith Moon than his dad!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe Lennon had to be' date=' since Ringo was "adequate". Have you seen Zac Starkey play? More like Keith Moon than his dad![/quote']

I played drums a long time, I always thought the Ringo was a good rock drummer, a solid time keeper. His work on "A Day in the Life" is great. A rock drummer's primary task is keeping the beat, he did it well. In the early 60's a drummers first priority was the beat, keep them dancing, The Beatles started out as a dance band and morphed into a more progressive rock band. The Beatles never were a "jam band".

Now if you want to compare Ringo to say Elvin Jones, it's a different story, Jones was by far a better percussionist, but then he was better then 90% of rock drummers including Moon. To play drums in a Jazz band you have to be IMO head and shoulders above the everyday run of the mill rock drummer. I saw Moon, he was a great rock drummer, I saw Ginger Baker play with Blind Faith, his solos were awesome.

Then I saw Jones, he could keep different times on each drum, each cymbal and high hat and do it forever. He was the best. The big difference is dynamics. There are plenty of fast rock drummers, there are plenty of loud rock drummers. There are very few dynamic rock drummers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brother' date=' Lennon was everything. You realize a lot of the leads on the later albums were Lennon, right? Both he and Harrison had tasty skills.

[/quote']

but the hardest rockin solos were always Paul as in Taxman, Good Morning Good Morning and Sgt. Pepper. George admitted he was big into the sitar at this point and never even picked up his guitar until they went into the studio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have never liked having two guitars in one band.

I believe this whole notation of having one rhythm and one lead is a lazy mind set' date=' Plus a lot more toes get stepped on if you know what I mean.

 

[/quote']

 

Think Felder and Walsh of the Eagles. Two great players complimenting each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Speaking of "Beatles' date='" the Gretsch (Duo-Jet, Country Gent, and Tennessean) and Ric combination, was killer.

And, the later Epi Casino(s), and various Gibson and Fender combinations worked well, also. But then,

the players had a lot to do with all that, no doubt. The (original) Byrds carried on the Rick (12-string) and Gretsch tradition. Gibson and Fender can be a good combo, too. Just really depends on the player's preference, amps,

and style.

 

The band I'm in, has 2 guitar players, and we work at complimenting and not stepping on one another.

As to combining 2 guitars, in the rhythm parts...we do our best NOT to play chords the same way. If I

play open chords, he'll do barre chords, or vice versa...or in different positions, on the neck. Makes it

more fun, and interesting, musically, too.

 

CB

[/quote']

 

+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moonie was Zaks Godfather.

Also gave him his first drum kit, if I remember correctly.

 

Of course, saying Zak sounds like Keith Moon is a bit of an unfair advantage, considering he's playing with The Who. You can't play like Ringo there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also gave him his first drum kit' date=' if I remember correctly.

 

Of course, saying Zak sounds like Keith Moon is a bit of an unfair advantage, considering he's playing with The Who. You can't play like Ringo there.[/quote']

 

Yes and Ringo tells a great story of when Zak wanted a drum kit for his birthday. His dad bought him a cool little 4 piece set. Next thing he knows Moonie pulls up with a delivery truck and has a 30 piece drum set with every thing you could imagine including gongs. But thats Keith Moon for ya!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a huge fan of the Beatles.... and I'm happy to say that this is the first time I've heard that song!!!!! At the age of 32 there are still new Beatles tracks (to me)

 

So that's a tele/casino combination... check!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When my blues band formed 18 years ago, the other guitar player and I were both playing Strats through the same type amplifier (Music Man 212-HD). As the band developed and our styles blended (and we stole licks from each other), it soon became apparent from our recordings that, other than his slide work, WE couldn't even tell which parts we played ourselves.

 

That gave me the perfect opportunity to pull out the Gibsons. The old 335 came out of the stroreroom, and we have never looked back. The blending of sonic qualities of the Strat and the Gibson ES have worked well for us, although a Les Paul or any twin humbucker Gibson would give a similar distinction between guitars.

 

Neither of us use any pedal so it's just pure guitar tone. Our current setup, as has been for the last ten years or so, is him playing a Strat through a 4-10 Bassman, and me playing an ES-345 through a Music Man 210-65.

 

As Eric Clapton said about the Layla album when asked which guitar parts were him and which were Duane, "He's playing the Gibson, I'm playing the Fender."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the current band I'm in, (we're just "weekend warriors,"basically), the other guitar player uses a

'68 Les Paul Custom, mostly. I use either a Telecaster, or a "Semi" (Riviera, or Sheaton...usually).

They're all, complimentary, to his LPC. Sometimes, he'll use a Telecaster, in which case, I again use the

Semi's, or my '61 SG. He plays through a Vox AC-30...I usually use a Fender amp (Blues Junior, HR Deluxe,

or Twin Reverb)...depending on venue size. We both use pedals, but sparingly, as the song requires.

 

CB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...