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Stewie

2006 Les Paul Classic Goldtop Checking?

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IMO its nothing you have done, neither is it an issue with chambering/weight releif.

 

this all comes down to the pots the checking is starting from the base of the pots so first initial culprit would be them being to tight causing an issue with the finish that will unfortunately get worse. Gibson should see this (even though they do not have a warranty policy on finishes) as the pots.

 

yes checking on older guitars shows the guitars age and journey but fresh (wet look) laquer with checking doesn't look so great. Wanna make it look old and good with checking? dont use guitar polish (this moisturises the laquer) instead clean it with Naptha fluid and saliva! yes saliva best thing for your OWN guitar. this will help your laquer to dry out and the tone to (IMO) come alive like the oldies

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My son has a Gibson Les Paul Deluxe Goldtop 2007. If I posted a picture, it would look just like Stewie's, right down to the fact that the longitudinal cracks emanate from either side of where the hex nuts from the volume and tone controls press into the wood. So Stewie, did you ever do anything about your checking? Did the lines ever get longer? Has this happened to many other Goldtops? I was wondering if Gibson has a design flaw/defect that they are not admitting. I know it doesn't affect the sound, but it is distressing to see this on a relatively new guitar in mint condition. If anyone else has a similar experience, please post. Thanks.

AndyVt

Gibson under no circumstances were going to do anything about finish checking. They pointed me to their warranty.

They sent me a copy of this.

 

This Warranty Is Subject To The Following Limitations

 

THIS WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER:

 

1.Any instrument that has been altered or modified in any way or upon which the serial number has been tampered with or altered.

2.Any instrument whose warranty card has been altered or upon which false information has been given.

3.Any instrument that has been damaged due to misuse, negligence, accident, or improper operation.

4.The subjective issue of tonal characteristics.

5.Shipping damages of any kind.

6.Any instrument that has been subjected to extremes of humidity or temperature

7.Normal wear and tear (i.e., worn frets, worn machine heads, worn plating, string replacement, scratched pickguards, or damages to or discoloration of the instrument finish for any reason).

8.Any instrument that has been purchased from an unauthorized dealer, or upon which unauthorized repair or service has been performed.

9.Any factory installed electronics after a period of one (I) year following the original date of purchase.

10.Cracking, discoloration or damage of any sort to the finish or plating for any reason

11.Gibson does not warranty the playability of a instrument whose "action" is lower than the standard "action" as defined in the owners manual.

I pleaded my case on the Les Paul Forums and everybody thought I was crazy not to be really happy that my Goldtop had already started to check. I also talked to my guitar tech and he said he has two of them and they both have the same checking. Apparently all goltops do this to some extent. It has something to do with the gold and the laquer.

I have since changed the pickups for a set of Burstbucker 1s and 2s (That I purchased from a guy who took them out of a Historic), and an RS guitarworks vintage pot and 022 cap kit. It is now one of the best sounding guitars I own, and a joy to play. I don't even notice the checking now. I think if anyone read the warranty on Gibson guitars, it might make people think twice.

I hope that answers your question.

This all took place a couple of years ago. The Checking hasn't gotten any worse, and it isn't just the pot area. Any where a screw went through the finish, including the pickup rings, and pickguard. I haven't had any of the checking that older guitars get from just "being a goldtop" but I am sure it will come.

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yes i done similar upgrades really makes the guitar come out tonally

 

that sucks with the waranty but at least its not structual

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Strange! I own a much cheaper version of a Goldtop, a Studio 50's Tribute. I have it since the end of last year and kept it in that really cheap gigbag until a week ago when I finally bought a hardcase. I live in an old house which is under continous (lifelong) reconstruction, with drastical environmental changes happening all the time: I do paint the walls on weekends, so there's extreme humidity conditions inside. Now it's very hot here - nearly 40 celsius degrees in shade...and I have no issues on my guitar, neither with the finish nor with other parts. It was checked by a luthier 2 weeks ago (what I regularly do) and it has no issues at all.

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Thanks for all these ideas and reasons for looking at the bright side. It is good news that it is not structural and it doesn't affect the sound. It is disappointing that a relatively new guitar that has been taken care of can just one day have these lines on it. I guess the purchase of a Gibson Les Paul, like a many other fine objects, is not for the "faint of heart." AndyVt

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I will add to this. I just read the entire thread. I have a 2011 Deluxe Gold Top and I have the exact same thing going on. I have a crack by one of the knobs and two under the bridge. Someone routed out the pick up cavities and did a bad job. Chicago Music Exchange fixed it. I will add pictures soon. Thanks.

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This is very sad and quite disconcerting. I have seen checking and crackle on some very old guitars, and what you have does not resemble that at all. Apparently it is not uncommon as per the number of responders that have experienced the same thing, and obviously it is one reason Gibson doesn't warrant the finish.

 

You would think with all the modern technology and science that goes into making an expensive instrument this could be avoided - hopefully improvements will be made at some point in the future. As mentioned, a crack or fissure in the finish should not diminish how the guitar sounds or plays but it still doesn't seem right.

 

I have 4 Gibson guitars the oldest being a 2002 and none of them are showing anything like this yet, but I will be very disappointed if they do.

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Those are stress fractures in the gold paint from somebody forcing the knobs onto their shafts. Better to drill them out so they fit on without force being required.

Gold paint uses copper which tends to crack. Just ignore the fractures but don't use force on gold paint anymore. Gold paint is unique and requires delicate handling.

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Yep, "Stress Fractures," in the paint! Not "checking!" I have a 1976 Gibson LP Deluxe, that has NO checking, or stress

fractures, at all! My '64 Strat has none, as well! So, even "Vintage" guitars don't HAVE to have finish checking. However,

with "Nitro" finishes, it's actually quite common. Some folks LOVE that patina, and even have it done, to pristine new (or old)

guitars, on purpose, at considerable extra cost.

 

For me, if "checking" happens "naturally," to any of my guitars, in the future, for whatever reason, so be it. But, I'd never

pay a premium to have it done. But, that's just "Me!" [biggrin]

 

If it really bothers you, take it to a good, skilled Luthier, and see what he/she can do(?), for you! There are finish treatments

available, but they can be tedious, and time consuming=expensive, for such a small area. And, best carried out, by true and skilled

professionals.

 

Good Luck!

 

CB

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My 81 V doesn't have any problems with the finish, no cracking, checking or anything like that. It has lots of wear from being played a LOT for 33 years (when I bought it) but no issues with the paint, finish, whatever, other than where I've banged it on something or something like that. 36 years old and no major issues from the factory. It seems someone cranked down the pots when it was made at the factory. I think I'll go home and make sure mine are tight but not too tight. I wouldn't think you'd have to double check things like that on a guitar that costs a few thousand dollars. But, they're made by people and people aren't perfect. Perhaps Gibson had a bodybuilder working for them during those years and he (or she) overcranked them.

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I think this guy is a moron who just destroyed a perfectly good guitar.

Finish checking is caused by either rapid temperature swings (cold guitar into warm room) or the wood wasn't dried properly at the factory.  Ted McCarty was horrified when he took over the reins many years ago and purchased kilns to get things done properly.

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On 10/20/2019 at 9:30 AM, SteveFord said:

I think this guy is a moron who just destroyed a perfectly good guitar.

Finish checking is caused by either rapid temperature swings (cold guitar into warm room) or the wood wasn't dried properly at the factory.  Ted McCarty was horrified when he took over the reins many years ago and purchased kilns to get things done properly.

Amen!  Take care of your guitars boys and girls, don't be a moron with it. 

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This is my 2006 CS Les Paul Special:

35622261213_6b03718f20_b.jpg

In comparison, I also have a 2006 CS Les Paul R8 with no checking at all. I bought both guitars around the same time in 2010, and they have been stored and used under the same environments / conditions under my care. I think the checking is cool, but I can see why someone don't like it. To me, it seems the Special has a thinner coat of lacquer, and I guess that makes sense as it isn't burst sprayed. I have no idea if that's the case, though...

Edit: By the way, I think Peter Honore is a fantastic guitarplayer, and as his goldtop was already starting to crack, I don't blame him for "finishing" the job...😎He can do whatever he likes to his guitars, and his Classic isn't nowhere near "destroyed".

Edited by Keefoman
Adding
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On 10/22/2019 at 10:22 AM, Keefoman said:

This is my 2006 CS Les Paul Special:

35622261213_6b03718f20_b.jpg

In comparison, I also have a 2006 CS Les Paul R8 with no checking at all. I bought both guitars around the same time in 2010, and they have been stored and used under the same environments / conditions under my care. I think the checking is cool, but I can see why someone don't like it. To me, it seems the Special has a thinner coat of lacquer, and I guess that makes sense as it isn't burst sprayed. I have no idea if that's the case, though...

Edit: By the way, I think Peter Honore is a fantastic guitarplayer, and as his goldtop was already starting to crack, I don't blame him for "finishing" the job...😎He can do whatever he likes to his guitars, and his Classic isn't nowhere near "destroyed".

To me this is what good or desirable checking looks like and happened naturally.. The Goldtop just looks scratched to me.

 

My BluesHawk below has bad natural checking, that runs with the grain and fakes off.

PH0Qm6i.jpg

Edited by mihcmac

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15 hours ago, Keefoman said:

This is my 2006 CS Les Paul Special:

 

In comparison, I also have a 2006 CS Les Paul R8 with no checking at all. I bought both guitars around the same time in 2010, and they have been stored and used under the same environments / conditions under my care. I think the checking is cool, but I can see why someone don't like it. To me, it seems the Special has a thinner coat of lacquer, and I guess that makes sense as it isn't burst sprayed. I have no idea if that's the case, though...

Edit: By the way, I think Peter Honore is a fantastic guitarplayer, and as his goldtop was already starting to crack, I don't blame him for "finishing" the job...😎He can do whatever he likes to his guitars, and his Classic isn't nowhere near "destroyed".

I think your example looks awesome.! It's happened naturally and by doing so the outcome IMHO is more acceptable. If Peter was to come out and state that his checking happened natural, I would scratch my head, just doesn't look right.

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17 hours ago, Keefoman said:

This is my 2006 CS Les Paul Special:

35622261213_6b03718f20_b.jpg

In comparison, I also have a 2006 CS Les Paul R8 with no checking at all. I bought both guitars around the same time in 2010, and they have been stored and used under the same environments / conditions under my care. I think the checking is cool, but I can see why someone don't like it. To me, it seems the Special has a thinner coat of lacquer, and I guess that makes sense as it isn't burst sprayed. I have no idea if that's the case, though...

Edit: By the way, I think Peter Honore is a fantastic guitarplayer, and as his goldtop was already starting to crack, I don't blame him for "finishing" the job...😎He can do whatever he likes to his guitars, and his Classic isn't nowhere near "destroyed".

 

Now those lines look sexy! there's something about yellow LP jr/special

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