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HELP ME!!!! broken headstock tips


atfguitar

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Hi I am an SG player and i have run apon some trouble i have my guitar in a hard shell case, and stupid me for thinking that it would be protected left it leaning on a wall and a 2 yr old child rode by on his tricycle and knocked it over thus snapping the head stock almost completely off. being in a small town at the time i didnt have much resorces to get it fixed so i took it to the closest guitar shop and they made what would be a temporary fix because about 5 months later one of my friends knocked it off its stand thus snapping the head stock even more its a beautiful guitar and i would love to play it again someday ,does anybody have an idea what i should do yo fix this once beautiful guitar?

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yeah i heard that you could even use apoxy resin and fiberglass but i dont want to do that unless i know for a fact it will work i wanna try to fix it but i want something thats not gunna screw with the sound and a good fix ive also heard about boat apoxy but then again i dont know if thats a good idea either

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Don't use epoxy resin type products it will fail and also fill the pores of the wood preventing wood glue to hold in the future.

Wood glue is the best thing that can be used to fix it, along with dowel rods inserted to reinforce things but that is

for a skilled person.

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Technically, with wood glue (pva) it should ba as strong, if not stronger, than it was before, but i would suggest sending it to a tech.. they might need to melt the finish a little to make it seem flawless again, and with stuff that has that kinda effect on nitro, you want somone who knows what thery are doing....

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The best glue for this kind of repair is hot hide glue. It out-performs all the Titebond products in shear strength and heat resistance (even Titebond's latest polyurethane glue). It is the outright number one choice.

 

The area can be strengthened further by the use of splints.

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I don't know what your circumstance is, but I would take it to as many reputable luthiers as possible for opinions.

Discuss the every detail mentioned above - types of glue, dowels, screws - and don't rush.

Get price quotes - with the understanding that they may be varied and vague.

A good luthier will do everything he can to make it right as long as he knows you won't get scared of the bill.

 

Select one from the bunch that seems to work best for you.

Allow him all the time he needs to do it right and don't b!tch about the price - he's saving your baby.

 

 

Honestly, the guitar is not worth the money.

But where I have a problem with that is - what do you do?

Use it for fire wood?

Like you, it makes my skin crawl to think of simply giving up....

 

Get it repaired, assuming the first botched repair doesn't make that impossible.

Treat the guitar with the care and consideration it deserves.

Play the hell out of it, knowing it has jack for resale value.

 

I hope it works out for you, and you enjoy the guitar for many years to come.

Good luck.

 

 

P.S.,

Have you never heard how vulnerable the Gibson headstock is?

Just sayin'......

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definitely take it to a quality luthier, and BE CAREFUL with it. Headstock joints are weak and notorious for breaking, especially when they don't have a volute and also have a hole drilled for a truss rod. the weight of the tuners when it is falling over can easily snap the wood there, so always store it in a case on the ground or in a rack where it won't fall over.

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