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Amp repair question


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How easy is it to replace the plug on an amp? Is it as simple as buying a three prong plug at the hardware store, cutting off the broken plug, and connecting the wires?

 

We have a beat up Rolland keyboard amp at our space and some ****** broke the ground off of the plug. Having been zapped more times than I can count, I want to fix this so the amp is grounded.

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How easy is it to replace the plug on an amp? Is it as simple as buying a three prong plug at the hardware store' date=' cutting off the broken plug, and connecting the wires?

 

We have a beat up Rolland keyboard amp at our space and some ****** broke the ground off of the plug. Having been zapped more times than I can count, I want to fix this so the amp is grounded. [/quote']

 

 

It should be that easy, yes. Check where it is actually wired into the amp, though, and see if you can't replace the chord as a unit, first, then do that which represents the least pain in the arse.

 

Good luck!

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Yes it is very easy to replace a bad plug. Just go to one of the big box hardware stores and buy a "commercial/industrial" grade replacement plug. They are generally a large barrel type about 1" dia. and 2" long. They will be screw clamp terminal and no soldering will be needed.

 

Now here's the VERY important part. It's pretty obvious to connect the green ground wire to the third ground lug connection point. But It DOES matter which way you connect the other black and white wires on a three-prong grounded plug. The white wire goes to the wider spade lug, generally a silver screw when making the wire connection, and the black wire goes to the narrower spade lug, generally a brass connecting screw.

 

If you look at a wall outlet you will notice that one slot is wider than the other. On an outlet with the ground hole below the slotted holes, the wider slot is always on the left. This is the "common" leg of the power source, and is the white wire inside the wall and on the power cords. The narrower slot is the "hot" side, black wire in wall and on the cord. The difference in the outlet slot sizes is to "polarize" the outlet. Meaning that even if you have a two prong plug, it will only go in the outlet one way.

 

Failure to connect the "hot" (black) and "common" (white) wires to the correct terminals could cause injury to you and your equipment.

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Some old Roland amps don't require soldering, they have screwed terminals where you can just take the existing wire out and put the other in there.

 

Even if there's soldering to be done it should be easy, but always remember to be careful, amps have a transformer inside that can pack quite a punch if you place your hands or any metal stuff in the wrong place.

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Even if there's soldering to be done it should be easy' date=' but always remember to be careful, amps have a transformer inside that can pack quite a punch if you place your hands or any metal stuff in the wrong place.[/quote']

 

This is why I am only interested in replacing the plug. I know just enough to know I shouldn't be opening any amp up.

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