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J-45 Pricing


lockjawdavis

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Gibson did a "price increase" apparently last fall. So standard GC J45 price went from $1999 to $2399 (maybe $2299). Same guitar, hanging on the wall, new price tag. And it's staying that way, it seems. However, after Christmas I saw a J45 at one GC on clearance for $1499 but this baby needed help. I saw another at a different GC on sale for $1799. My guess is if you find the one you want, you can probably get it for $1800 in this economy. Good luck.

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They have new rosewood standard at my local GC for $2300 w/ an under saddle pick-up (I think)[confused] Has the volume roller pot at the top of the sound hole and a jack end pin anyway. Plays and sounds fantastic but has a pretty good finsh smudge on the top. Typical floor model at my local GC. It is a player though and I have found some of the new/newer J45's not to be.

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Fullers in Houston has a new Custom Shop 1964 J-45 that they had made exclusively for them for $1699. This is very similar to the Custom Shop 1960s J-45 that Musicians Friend sold out of a couple of years back.

 

Here's Fuller's Link:

http://www.fullersguitar.com/shop?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=719&category_id=0

 

Here's Musicians Friend's former link to the similar model:

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Gibson-Acoustic-Icon-60s-J45-Sunburst-Acoustic-Guitar?sku=513966&src=3SOSWXXB

 

I purchased my CS 1964 J-45 from Fullers a few months ago. I find it to be a great guitar. All the characteristics of the original 1964 J-45, too although I believe the neck, though definitely 1964 influenced is equally 2000's influenced...the original 1964's neck was thinner (which was always controversial...some loved it, some hated it for its thinness. Then, again...back then all of the necks on each guitar were slightly different from each other as it pre-dated any type of computerized neck cutting. Additionally, the adjustable saddle on the CS 1964 J-45 is tusq as opposed to ceramic on the original (also controversial at the time).

 

Jerry Fuller (the owner's son) filled me in on these additional details of the CS 1964 J-45 (from the description in the Fullers link.)

 

1)The bracing pattern is similer in pattern to the True Vintage models, but it is a much lighter (to emulate the original 1964 model it copies.)

2)The True Vintage uses hide glue on the top braces, the CS 1964 does not. (Jerry advised that he is unable to hear a difference due to the hide glue).

3)The Musicians Friend version (the Icon model shown in the above link) had the same bracing as the Fullers version.

4)Fullers had Gibson use a more expensive lacquer finish on their version of the CS 1964 J-45 than the one Musicians Friend used on their 1960s icon version.

5)Fullers chose to have Gibson stamp the FON on the inside of the neck block to emulate the original 64 model it copies.

 

As FYI. I side by side compared my CS 1964 J-45 to a friend's original 1965 J-45. Looked indistiguishable from it. Other than the aged quality of the 1965, it sounded very similar.

 

The price is great. The guitar is great. An adjustable saddle may not be for everyone, though. I personally like the adjustable saddle sound as well as its ease to raise or lower the saddle. Normally, I go through different periods with my guitars of raising or lower the action from the saddle. Higher saddle action on an acoustic definitely increases the acoustic volume. Currently, I have the CS 1964 J-45's saddle action set really low and the guitar is sweet as can be although a bit on the quiet side. To check out how the guitar acoustically sounds, you can listen to one of my audio/videos on YouTube: (They show me with my Southern Jumbo, but I'm playing the CS 1964 J-45 (which is briefly periodically pictured in the Pipeline video.)

 

Jazzman Jeff Performs Pipeline on a CS 1964 J-45 (the J-45 is periodically shown in the video).

 

Jazzman Jeff Performs Revolution on a CS 1964 J-45 (not shown in the video)

 

Jazzman Jeff Performs Latin Lemonade on a CS 1964 J-45 (not shown in the video)

 

You might want to call Jerry Fuller at Fullers to learn even more about the guitar he is selling. Feel free to mention that I referred you as a previous buyer of one. (He would know me as Jazzman Jeff who bought a CS 1964 J-45 from him, if he remembers).

 

Hope this helps in your J-45 choices and decision-making.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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Jazzman, thanks very much for the detailed info. I'd never heard of Fuller's!! I'll spend the morning checking out those links and getting in touch with Mr. Fuller. Thanks again for taking the time to help me out!

 

By the way, BRAVO on your performances on YouTube! Especially love your arrangement of "Pipeline!"

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Thanks' date=' Paul. I've been checking eBay and Craigslist and haven't seen much I liked for the price. Not too many pawn shops around here with J-45s laying around either.[/quote']

 

Almost every pawnshop knows the value of a guitar, low ball the seller, and post the highend guitar on Ebay. Very standard thing to do... The best place to look is Guitar Center's used website. Prices are general lower then Ebay.

Another great tatic is to post a wanted listing on Craigslist and ask for the guitar you want. Tell the seller to meet you at a Guitar Center, have them appraise it and then offer the seller a few more dollars then what Guitar Center would. This does three things: 1) Makes sure the guitar is in good condition and not altered. 2) Makes sure you get a fair price. 3) Keeps you safe from wack jobs out there.. IMHO...

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I'm curious if there are any other dealers that offer J-45s either custom or standard at simlar prices of the Fuller's? I like the look of their CS '64 but not sure about the adjustable bridge and neck. Is the neck similar to a Standard J-45 or is thinner? Also, are there any concerns with the bridge?

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The width of the fretboard is the same. The back of the neck seems a bit flatter, less C shaped, than on the Standard...in my opinion. It has a great feel to it and is very comfortable. The original 60s neck, in my opinion, was narrower on the fretboard and the back of the neck was thinner. 60s necks were always controversial due to their thinness. Some loved 'em, some didn't. The neck on CS 1964 J-45 seems to satisfy both worlds...influenced by the 60's, but also influenced by guitar's tastes in the 2000's. The adjustable bridge was always controversial. Some liked it, some didn't. Its ability to function as an adjustable bridge on an acoustic guitar was never at question. It worked reliably fine. The original adjustable bridge's used a ceramic saddle which some felt didn't transfer sound as well as bone (or later tusq.) The newer version on the CS 1964 J-45 has a tusq saddle. I believe the original adjustable bridge may have also had two bolts under the two pearl inlays on the bridge, which some felt hurt the sound transfer (and I've heard reports may have pulled up on some instruments. Not sure on this one.) The CS 1964 J-45while having two pearl dots on the bridge do not contain bolts under them...they're just for show and reminiscent of the 1964 model. The adjustable bridge still remains conversial today. I personally always liked their functionality, look, and vibe...plus never had a problem with the sound from them. But, the adjustable bridge is a personal matter. I have many guitars with Gibson's regular bridge as well as the CS 1964 J-45 with the adjustable bridge and like 'em all.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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How does the adjustable bridge operate? I'm not familar with this feature. One other question if you were to choose between the CS '64 & Modern Classic J-45 which one? I'm not concerned about the ability to plug-in. I'm interested in the tone and playability. Unfortunately, I don't have the abilty to play many J-45 models in my area. Thank you in advance for your consideration.

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Gibson's flat top adjustable bridge is a rosewood (I think) bridge glued to the top like any other bridge...except it has a saddle holder mechanism that sits in the bridge that has two small screws...one on each side of the mechanism that when tightened or loosened raise or lower the saddle that sits in the mechanism. A spring is involved with the screws that enables the saddle to be raised or lowered. On a non-adjustable bridge, the saddle can only be lowered by ir-reversably filing the saddle down or raised by putting in a new saddle or putting shims under an existing saddle. In my case, I chose the CS 1964 J-45 over the Modern Classic J-45 because of the heritage cherry sunburst, the 60s vibe of the guitar, and the adjustable saddle (which I like). However, I also own a number of other Gibson guitars and I was looking specifically for a 60s J-45 or a 60s reissue because I always liked that version of the J-45 best. But, that's my own taste and its in the context of the other Gibson guitars that I own. There's different versions because each player has their own needs and has to go with an instrument that connects with them and will enable them to musically explore their own unique musical muse. In my case, the CS 1964 J-45 was that guitar. You've got to decide what's best for you as a musician.

 

Hope this helps.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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Has anyone had experience with a pickup on one of these models with the adjustable bridge? I've found one I really like, but the dude in the shop had no clue as to what you'd have to do about putting a pickup in it?

 

Any info appreciated!

 

Justin.

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I tried the forum's search engine. Here's a link to a previous posting string on the subject:

 

http://forums.gibson.com/default.aspx?g=posts&t=25247

 

I personally use a Fishman Humbucker soundhole pick-up on all my acoustic guitars (including the CS 1964 J-45)...that I move from one to the other. Justin's question seems to really be will an undersaddle pickup work with a Gibson adjustable bridge. (I have no clue.) However, there are other alternatives to undersaddle pickups to mic/amplifying an acoustic guitar.

 

Hope the above link and my comments sparks more discussion on the topic for Justin.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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Has anyone had experience with a pickup on one of these models with the adjustable bridge? I've found one I really like, but the dude in the shop had no clue as to what you'd have to do about putting a pickup in it?

 

Justin, I have a 1966 J45adj cherry burst. I have had an L R Baggs M1 active soundhole pickup fitted. This is a REALLY good pickup. It sounds amazing and feedback is not an issue with these. Having it fitted involves having the endpin removed and a hole drilled. That's the only structural change. If you want to remove the pick up it is easy, it takes just a few minutes. It has a mini jacksocket insite you just unplug after loosening the strings to get your hand in and then the pickup is easily taken out.

The battery (inside the pickup) is supposed to last about 3 years, but I don't know yet! It will depend how much you use it.

 

I have found these pickups to sound excellent, and I also have one on my J185-12

 

An undersaddle is no good for these J45's which have a bolt on bridge.

 

If the dude in the shop has no idea about how to put a pickup in he is NOT the one to be letting loose on your J45!!!! Find someone else!

 

Hope that is of some interest to you.

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Thanks Jeff and KL for re-interpretting my question correctly!

 

Yep, I'm thinking that an under saddle is a no go. Hopefully the guitar is still there on Monday (saw it Friday, and they're closed Sunday), when their tech is back. The dude who didn't know about the pickup was a salesman.

 

I've had a look/listen/read about pickups, and I'm leaning towards at least starting with the M1 Active.

 

Here's hoping that I can purchase Monday morning and get the pickup in by Wednesday before my first tour of the year starts on Thursday!

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Hi guys,

 

Nope, not Eddie, and don't play sax!

 

I'll make sure I get some photos up once I get back from tour - might even get em up on tour if we've got something resembling an internet connection somewhere.

 

Cheers guys - see you all in a couple of weeks with 14 shows of gig reports!

 

Justin.

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