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brundaddy

Who made you want to play an f-hole guitar?

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I would have to say all of the ones listed in these pages to some extent! Being that I'am awed by humble pie/steve marriott and all the different gibbys that he played lead me to a les paul std. totally love it!so i started looking at steve's later recordings in particular his dvd packet of 3 live at camden palace an awesome dvd. But upon seeing and hearing him play a blonde 335 on it and hearing that 335 GROWL it can't be beat.so got a dot now too!

All i can say is paul is scremer and dot is a growler.there is some common sounds between'em ,dots got a definite growl.I now have 2 favorites definately keepers

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Saw this thread a long time ago, but forgot to post.

 

For me it was T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, Freddie King, Robert Jr. Lockwood, Otis Rush, Kenny Burrell, Oscar Moore, Grant Green, Billy Butler, Bill Jennings, Robert Cray, Junior Watson, Charlie Baty... and about 900 others.

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Saw this thread a long time ago, but forgot to post.

 

For me it was T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, Freddie King, Robert Jr. Lockwood, Otis Rush, Kenny Burrell, Oscar Moore, Grant Green, Billy Butler, Bill Jennings, Robert Cray, Junior Watson, Charlie Baty... and about 900 others.

 

I've never seen Robert Cray play anything but a Strat. When did he play a (semi) hollow?

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I've never seen Robert Cray play anything but a Strat. When did he play a (semi) hollow?

The first couple of times I saw him, back in the late 1970's, he was playing an ES345. I found this photo online. I have better photos, but I haven't gotten around to uploading them.

 

293286_10150314088478791_101716548790_8406222_1819069784_n.jpg

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The first couple of times I saw him, back in the late 1970's, he was playing an ES345. I found this photo online. I have better photos, but I haven't gotten around to uploading them.

 

293286_10150314088478791_101716548790_8406222_1819069784_n.jpg

 

Wow, that's an old one. Thanks

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When I put my hands on my first Dot I really dug the semi hollow sound. I was listening to a lot of people already mentioned, but I was uneducated and didn't know who was playing what guitars, I just liked the music. The first person I remember listening to and knowing he was playing a a semi hollow was Ben Nichols, and it was then I realized how terrible my ears have been and how different and beautiful these guitars sound as opposed to the solid body varieties.

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Wow, that's an old one. Thanks

Yeah, a lot of people don't realize how far back Cray goes. He was a huge success at the San Francisco Blues Festival back in the mid-70's. I saw him there in '79 (along with a relatively unknown kid named Stevie Ray Vaughan, I might add). The Cray band with Curtis Salgado was really a thing of beauty... too bad it didn't last. Cray was playing more traditional blues and soul back then, and I for one never cared for him as much after he started becoming more commercially successful and doing more original material.

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Availability

I needed a guitar and my dad gave me 50 bucks for a used 50's Gretsch New Yorker which came with a new Lifton case, a bargain even in the 60's . I put a DeArmond on it and played through an Ampeg Reverb Rocket II.

That guitar got me through to College. Real good plywood, still solid and sets up to this day. Not much of a guitar though.

To this day I'm more comfortable on an archtop.

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Dan Auerbach and Jack White. I love that gritty tone with a slightly overdriven tube amp. Just listen to a black keys record and the tone just gets inside you. Same with Jack White and the Racontuers. Its like those guitars are alive!

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Larry, have you got a 61 or earlier 330 for $5000?

 

 

 

quote name='L5Larry' timestamp='1263250856' post='369102']

I saw what I thought was a 335 in a music store for $300.00 and I bought it. It was my first electric guitar. I loved it. Lightweight and it sounded great to my ears. Later I found out it was a 330...Fast forward to the 21st century. ...By then 330s were going for $5' date='000 on e-bay [/quote']

 

Notes,

OK, nice story, but I think it's time for a little realty check here. You want to tell me that you think you're student model ES-330 is worth $5000. If you can sell a 330 for $5000 then your my sales agent, I 'd like you to sell a few pieces for me. I've bought and sold guitars through the BIGGEST names in "vintage" guitars in the world, but I think maybe you must know more than they do.

 

Paul McCartney's '60 sunburst Les Paul came from a friend of mine (search this site), Johnny Winter's Firebird came from the same "dealer" (search this site). I haven't bought an off the wall guitar since I bought one of the first Les Paul Standard reissues from Mel Bal (around 1975). The slide player in my band played Johnny Winter's dobro before Johnny did (and will get it when he dies). Did you know that there was a '63 Firebird V waiting on Duane Allman to get home to Georgia from REHAB in New York, that he never even had a chance to see? I was also offered Duane's tobacco sunburst LP, but I wouldn't trade my Corvette Stingray for it. I've recently had pieces backstage at a Derek Trucks concert, and was asked to ship an amp to the 2009 Allman Bros Beacon Theater concerts. I even turned down a guy that wanted to trade his '56 hardtail Strat for my '60 Strat, plus a little cash (OK, I should have took that deal).

 

The one thing I do on this website is try to refute the BS. There are people out there that think because they read it on the WWW, it must be true. I also try to remain somewhat annonomus, but I have been dealing in, AND PLAYING, vintage guitars for almost 40 years, I won't have crap like this posted without a rebuttal.

 

Have a nice day,

Larry

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For me it was Malcolm Young, Chuck Berry, Bill Haley, whatshisname from Bow Wow Wow, Izzy Stradlin, and other rock and roll hoodlums. How about you?

 

Nobody ... back in the mid 70's I was foolin' around with a 335 at Long & McQuade Music in Toronto (band was on the road. BTW ... best party city closest to Detroit in the world!!!msp_flapper.gif )

I noticed how easy this guitar could do what I call the 'controlled feedback thing' where ya'd grab & bend a note or just hold one and the speakers would start feeding back with splitting octaves ... it was f'n beautiful.

 

To this day I try to grab that feedback with my FBV or SG or LP and although these guys will do it, it's harder than with a semi and doesn't quite sound as good. The 335 also does it at a lower volume.

I bought my first one then.

msp_thumbup.gif

 

 

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Yeah, a lot of people don't realize how far back Cray goes. He was a huge success at the San Francisco Blues Festival back in the mid-70's. I saw him there in '79 (along with a relatively unknown kid named Stevie Ray Vaughan, I might add). The Cray band with Curtis Salgado was really a thing of beauty... too bad it didn't last. Cray was playing more traditional blues and soul back then, and I for one never cared for him as much after he started becoming more commercially successful and doing more original material.

Used to live in Eugene during much of the '70s & early '80s. Saw Cray & Salgado play at a hotel in town one night, and loved it. Being heavily into acoustics at the time, I have no recollection of what Cray was playing. But back to the original question, my love of F-hole guitars came from finding old Kay-Harmony-Wards-etc archtops from the '30s at garage sales & swap meets. A particularly wonderful sounding Wards had a carved spruce top with X bracing, and a very comfy V shaped neck. Later discovered that it was made by Gibson.

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Freddie King, B.B. King, Otis Rush, Eric Clapton (Cream & Blind Faith era)and of course CHUCK BERRY!...and my first good guitar was a '66 ES-335 which I bought in 1971 and sold a few years later when I went to college. Tried Les Pauls, Telecasters and Strats. Nothing comes close to the feel and sound of the 335 family. Now I have a collection of Gibson semi-solids!

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My Dad, for sure. His father bought him a 67' Hagstrom Viking when he was a kid. No Gibson, but my pops used to play it to me when I was a child. Now I jacked it from him and pay it all the time. Elvis played one too!

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I learned to play guitar on my mom's 1956 ES-125. I've loved the look of an F-hole instrument ever since. Last year, I discovered the Epiphone Zenith bass. It's the most fun bass I've ever played, sounds great, and LOVE THOSE F-HOLES! [thumbup]

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