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new sj sig model


jefleppard

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Hmmm, at a guess I don't think Gibson expect to sell a lot of guitars at that top price. In the light of how well expensive aged replica electric models have sold it may be their way of putting their toe in the acoustic waters. The outrageous pricing on the signed models may be a marketing strategy to create a desirable aura around this new market to justify the only slightly less outrageous prices of the unsigned aged models. The perception and pricing go together to justify luxury goods expensive tags.

And who knows, maybe the aged model play and sound really great. The TV series is a great package (at a much saner price) with a nod in that direction. Personally I'm not sure I'd pay that money when the 'real' vintage market is still reachable inside that price range. But hey, even for the most expensive model, it would only buy you a mediocre new car that would soon be worth next to nothing in a few short years while these will be sounding even sweeter! So, each to his own.

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Gibson Acoustic already has some experience in selling aged, replica acoustics, having produced the Epiphone Paul McCartney USA '64 Texan. They didn't have any trouble selling 40 of those for $25K + a pop, or the other 250, unaged replicas for $4K. That's good coin for what is basically a long-scale J45.

 

If fans want to pay extra to have something that makes them feel closer to their idol, or have something collectable, so be it. It's not like there aren't standard production Southern Jumbos at the regular price for everyone else.

 

I also like the fact that Aaron Lewis is actually going to play and record with with a few of his sig. model, before they're sold. That's an extra touch I haven't seen done much. If I were a fan of this gentleman, I might think that kind of cool.

 

Red 333

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I would also say that the people who listen to Staind are a younger crowd. I think typically, ultra expensive guitars are bought by older folks who have accumulated a little bit of wealth over a period of years in the work force. Gibson's whole strategy with this model is a little off to me. But hey, it ain't the first time. The standard model may sell but I don't see the others going anywhere.

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I gave my son a 60s LG-1 that had a ton of scratches (no pickguard) from a waiter in a restaurant I played in. We were having a staff party to mourn the closing of the establishment and before I knew it there were tons of scratches where the pickguard would have been. If my son still has it, maybe he can sell it for enough to pay for his son's first year of college[biggrin]

Brad

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I kept looking for a launch date of April 1 .... this is just too stupid. Whats the marketing campaign message....."people who play our guitars are naive, gullible and we will (try and) exploit." This one will have heads shaking for a while. Marketing before substance I suppose.

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good comments. it has always been clever to seek out the younger players by sponsoring their idols. on the electric side, billy joe armstrong (green day) has helped inject life into the floundering les paul junior market with some sweet re-issues.

now, how about that jimmy fallon j-45?

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but' date=' there's hope - hope for us all... just stay by the phone because gibson could be calling you next!

[/quote']

 

It's funny you mention this. My friend has a custom made Sadowsky electric. His young daughter accidently put a couple of small scratchs on the top of the instrument. She was very upset, so he told her to get a couple of stickers from one of her stickerbooks and cover the scratches. He left the room and when he came back, the entire top was covered with stickers. He showed me the guitar and we both agreed that she did a nice job and it had to stay that way. After a few days, he tells me; "you know, if I become famous, this is what my signature model is gonna look like."

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Strumming up that high takes a lot of the 'woof' projection that strumming over or near the sound hole can give. Its an extra consideration with live microphones or recording. It also makes a more intimate connection between the two hands (for those sensitive, naval gazing ballad moments [biggrin] )

Bluegrass flatpickers would be mortified but that's a whole 'nother thang....

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I don't get the whole distressing/aging thing.

 

A friend of mine has a Dave Gilmour strat and its fantastic. Fender do it very well with their electrics and make some great guitars.

 

This one's not for me especially at $17k but I say well done Gibson for trying this on an acoustic. I like the fact they are trying out new things e.g. Dark Fire and the Zoot Suit SG.

 

It's all good!

 

You pay your money and take your choice.

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Strumming up that high takes a lot of the 'woof' projection that strumming over or near the sound hole can give. Its an extra consideration with live microphones or recording. It also makes a more intimate connection between the two hands (for those sensitive' date=' naval gazing ballad moments :-k )[/quote']

 

Also less resistance in that spot.

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