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rockman82

Ways to get rid of fretbuzz

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i was just thinking about the action. The buzz is mainly from the 1st fret to the 9th.

 

I raised the action, but still fretbuzz. So i'll try to re intonate the guitar, but im gonna wait until i get new strings, so i can clean the guitar. I've had this set on since last september. So it's overdo for cleaning.

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I know about removing the cover, all that. What i mean is getting the rod to turn. It seems that the rod is deep under the nut. I'll put a pic up. I have the allen wrench that came with the guitar. Out of all my years of playing, this is my first time having to do this. And there are no guitar techs around my town.

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when you put the allen in the nut it should just turn always lossen it first just in case also DO NOT FORCE IT if you can not get it to turn. If it does turn Just move it a small amount then retune check to see if the buzz is gone.

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you should have to tighten it to get the buzz to go away. I wouldn't tighten it no more the 2 or 3 full turns and if it gets hard to move the nut STOP !!! DO NOT FORCE IT

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Before making any adjustments to the truss rod, try a new set of strings. Setting the intonation will not stop a guitar from buzzing.

 

Edit - I have just read the post above. Do not follow this advice ! Tightening the truss rod will make the buzzing worse !

 

met1977, what were you thinking of ?

 

By tightening the truss rod nut 2 or 3 full turns, it will very likely cause serious damage.

 

First of all, try new strings. If the buzz is still there, you will have to measure the neck relief to find out if an adjustment is necessary. Fret buzz can be caused by several things, so it's best to be cautious and take it step by step.

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Before making any adjustments to the truss rod' date=' try a new set of strings. Setting the intonation will not stop a guitar from buzzing.

 

Edit - I have just read the post above. Do not follow this advice ! Tightening the truss rod will make the buzzing worse !

 

By tightening the truss rod nut 2 or 3 full turns, it will very likely cause serious damage.

 

First of all, try new strings. If the buzz is still there, you will have to measure the neck relief to find out if an adjustment is necessary. Fret buzz can be caused by several things, so it's best to be cautious and take it step by step.[/quote']

 

I stand corrected you are correct it should be loosen it and also so you didn't read it correctly because I didn't say to go ahead and tighten it 2 or 3 full turns I said DO NOT thighten it past 2 or 3 full turns go slowly and DO NOT FORCE IT. I have done a bunch of these and I also gave him a link that gives you directions on how to go about doing it. Just my 2 cents but I don't think strigs will help any at all...

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Well the truss rod won't move' date=' so im not messing with it. I might just find a professional and let him do it. I really don't want to mess up my sg.[/quote']

 

 

If it won't move then take it to a pro man...................

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If it won't move then take it to a pro man...................

 

Yeah. Finding one's the problem. Got any suggestions? the closest guitarcenter is memphis or nashville. And i can't afford the gas to go there.

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Yeah. Finding one's the problem. Got any suggestions? the closest guitarcenter is memphis or nashville. And i can't afford the gas to go there.
look on the gibson website for their warranty repair centers. find the closest one and take it there for a set up.

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Yeah. Finding one's the problem. Got any suggestions? the closest guitarcenter is memphis or nashville. And i can't afford the gas to go there.

Try PM Music in Jackson' date=' They're a Fender dealer, but I heard they have a decent tech. I bought my Dean ML there[biggrin']

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Hi,

 

It's impossible to damage your truss rod or neck by loosening the nut (unless you use the wrong size wrench and strip the inside of the nut itself as would happen to a screw when you use a screwdriver that is too small for it).

 

From the headstock, sight down the entire edge of the fretboard with your naked eye. If the neck (headstock and lower register) is bowed backwards then you should be able to see it. A back bow will guarantee fret buzz in the low to mid registers. Conversely, a slight upwards bow is known as 'relief' and is usually desirable to prevent fret buzz exactly where you are getting it. Relief allows the string to resonate in its normal eliptical pattern between its two anchor points without buzzing, although some players prefer to play with a straight neck, low action and a less aggressive strumming/fretting style.

 

You can physically measure relief by fretting the first and last frets (easier to do with a capo on the first fret) and then by using the depressed string as a straight edge. A set of car parts feeler gauges will then allow you to measure the gap. Relief is usually measured between the top of the 9th fret and the straight edge (the string underside) on the D string. About 0.008" is an average amount of relief.

 

To loosen the rod all you have to do is turn the nut counter clockwise (lefty loosey). Try a quarter to half a turn. This would introduce relief if you identify that it's needed. If adding some relief (if needed) and changing strings doesn't work then your frets might need leveling, crowning and polishing (collectively known as dressing) by a pro.

 

This is what you should not do:

 

Never tighten your truss rod (righty tighty) by more than a quarter of a turn/day and never force it tighter than it wants to go. Tightening the rod will obviously straighten a neck with too much upwards bow and will introduce back bow to an already straight neck. Tightening can compress the wood that the nut assembly presses against to bring the neck backwards and that is where over-tightening damage often occurs. The other sort of damage you can do is stripping the threads on the rod end/nut.

 

One last thought - the purpose of a truss rod is to counter the pull of the strings against the headstock which would otherwise cause a massive upbow, without a rod to straighten or near straighten it back. Are you tuned to your usual pitch? If you've dropped your pitch recently then the strings would be exerting less pressure and the rod may be pulling the neck back too 'straight' causing a backward bow.

 

No need for a tech IMO on loosening the truss rod provided you understand the above principles.

 

Does this help?

 

Alan

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