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Guitar For A Beginner


chenn

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I am looking to start getting into electric guitar, and my choices at the moment are either the Squier Package from Fender, or the Epiphone Special les Paul package from Gibson cause they are both in the my price range

 

Please provide some unbiased contructive suggestions for this beginner

 

I really want to learn!

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Welcome. The best thing is to try them out and see how they feel to you. Ask the store assistant to demonstrate them to you if you don't play yet. One thing to try to make sure with the less expensive guitars is to try to get one that stays in tune. Some cheaper guitars have poor quality tuners, so ask about this. It's better to get a simple guitar that stays in tune, feels comfortable to play and works, than one with lots of bling on it, but not so functional. It's always best to get the best quality instrument you can. Good luck!! Let us know what you get and how it's going.

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Opinions are going to vary.. and ultimately yours the only one that matters. However, in MY experience, I've found the lower end Squier's to be slightly nicer playing than the lower end Epi's.

 

But like the others said.. try some out if you can and judge for yourself.

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Opinions are going to vary.. and ultimately yours the only one that matters. However' date=' in MY experience, I've found the lower end Squier's to be slightly nicer playing than the lower end Epi's.

 

But like the others said.. try some out if you can and judge for yourself.[/quote']

 

The low end Squiers, IMO, are the best value for the money. It is all your decision, but I started out on a Squier, and have actually played some really nice ones.

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That Epi LP special II is a nice guitar for the money... it is what I recomend to new players. I'm not a huge fan of the Squire line, but that is mostly because they were utter shite when they were first released "back in the day".

 

Good luck, enjoy the hunt and let us know what you got!!

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They are equal packages. Try them, to be sure.

 

I've tried both the Stratocaster and Les Paul. I prefer the LP:

 

A. Because it has a more warm and woody tone that I love. The Strat copy has a tone that skews more to the metallic flavor, like an SG.

 

B. The selector switch on the LP is not in the flight path of my strumming hand like the Stratocaster copy. I was constantly, unintentionally, bumping and changing the selector switch. While Fender's 'Tele' falls into the same category tone wise and controls lay-out wise as the LP, you don't often see a Squire Tele gig-pack.

 

C. I just think the LP is a better looking guitar.

 

Only you can decide whether the lay-out and 'comfortableness' suits your playing. For me, the Strat is 'not so much'. For you... well only you can decide.

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Like others have suggested try them both out, i prefer the cheaper epi's to squiers. the other option is use the cash to buy a second hand guitar of higher quality. theres so many out there to choose from, both new and used that are affordable on lower budgets. spend a few hours in a music store and play lots of different instruments. most of all, enjoy playing and enjoy your purchase

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I actually have some different advice altogether. Get an acoustic and learn on it before you move onto an electric. The main reason is that you'll need to develop some good finger strength to play properly. An acoustic will force you to do this better than an electric. It may not be as sexy, but starting an acoustic is better...

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Okay... here's from the old man of the mountains. <grin>

 

First, you did not say whether you've been pickin' acoustic. If so, that would give you a bit of a muscle memory prejudice toward the Epi or Squire - and probably the Epi.

 

The Fender neck has a more curved fingerboard than the Gibson style. That may or may not be what you would want. Frankly I prefer the Gibson style neck and find the Fender style darned uncomfortable to the point it feels as if it's an entirely different sort of instrument requiring totally different technique.

 

I wouldn't mind having the Epi myself and I've much "better," but would make the little Gibson-style machine sing and not have to worry about taking my better stuff out in the recently lousy weather we've been having where I live. (Actually I don't care for the Strat and don't understand why copy strats are cheaper than copy Telecasters.)

 

I think the recommendation to try both sounds good if you have been playing some guitar. But frankly I would rather see a complete beginner start on the Gibbie style neck than the Fender style. A personal prejudice, perhaps...

 

Secondly... I don't know where you plan to buy, but I'm not entirely sold on "packages." I've figured I could get a low-end electric and a better than "package" amp and gig bag for about the same money.

 

Another factor nobody has mentioned: Strings and setup. If you are buying from a guitar store, make sure you have decent and probably rather light gauge strings on whichever you choose, and that the action is relatively low for fingering ease for a beginner. That will mean you probably shouldn't beat on the thing strumming, but it would also be a lot easier for practices of increasing time spans.

 

A beginner or beginning electric player may want the store mechanic to do a basic setup to make sure the guitar will be in tune and will play well for you. Making them mess with the instrument also would tell a store mechanic if the guitar may have a problem that you may not recognize as a beginner who takes home a big box and then plugs stuff together and expects to play.

 

If you're buying from a "big box" store where there isn't a real guitar person on staff - well, you may be better off buying over the Internet at a place like Musicians Friend or Sweetwater or Music 123 or anywhere that a sales person may actually know what a guitar should be like in order to be playable... They should be willing to take back a defective product, but also to ensure it's the instrument and not your - both of which are good for a beginner to know.

 

Finally - yeah, Rocketman has a great point. Except I'd say still use light, low strings on the acoustic too - unless you'll insist on beating up the poor thing.

 

m

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+1 for the acoustic. Never have to turn it down and it goes with you anywhere.

 

However, if you go electric a starter pack is the way to go. Stay away from the Starcaster!! The Squier Starter Pack or the Epiphone comes with much better guitar for the money. The Epi Les Paul Special might be a bit nicer than the Squier Tele, the frets have a nicer finish and the neck will more likely be straight.

 

However, the Squier pack has a better Amplifier. I comes with a nice little Fender Frontman, and if you get a bad neck, you can send it back. My Niece got one with a Rocking Chair neck, sent it back and the next one was perfect. The pick ups on the Epi and the Squier are about the same quality.

 

Ibanez makes a really nice Guitar and a really Nice Amp. the Tone Blaster series are wonderful entry level amps, not quite as warm as the Frontman, but very good Modern Overdrive and good cleans. But you have to like that kind of Guitar, and outside the Artcore Series, I don't much like Ibanez Neck Shapes.

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