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Silenced Fred

Would you?


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Lately, I hear more and more about how artists should start moving towards computers instead of amplifiers, or that some artists are because its easier and cleaner and more versatile, etc...

 

Personally, I don't think I will, just something about the amplifier. Can you imagine Hendrix playing with a laptop in front of him, instead of the wall of Marshalls?

 

If it works for you, I say go for it. But as Jack White said in It Might Get Loud, "Sure, technology may get you there faster, but it doesn't help creativity."

 

Discuss please

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If the ToneLab LE doesn't count as a "computer" then no.

 

DSCI0720.jpg

 

This fit's my needs.......

 

DA-5 is not on stage,

 

but there is another backup-amp

Fame-GX60R-112.jpg

 

Peter

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I voted other because I will use whatever tool it takes to make the sound I'm looking for at least when recording.

 

However, in a live situation it would ALWAYS be an amp - not always tube either because sometimes a SS may be needed.

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Depends on the sound. Why use something that might not sound as good as something else. If a computer ends up sounding better than an actual tube amp (eventually), I see no reason to haul around a bunch of heavy gear that sounds inferior.

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Yep... I'ma go with "whatever it takes". Right now, that's into an amp live, and into a PC for recording. All based on the aforementioned ToneLab LE.

 

For the record, musicians have been using sequencers and digital equipment for many years now when playing live. I've seen both Rush and Queen leave the stage while their songs played on.... so I'm pretty confident that the answer is "one will do whatever it takes".

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Mark my words;

I'll own a hundred different amplifiers before I run my signal through a computer.

 

If what I'm using doesn't sound like I want, then I have an excuse to buy more GEAR....

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Mark my words;

I'll own a hundred different amplifiers before I run my signal through a computer.

 

If what I'm using doesn't sound like I want' date=' then I have an excuse to buy more GEAR....[/quote']

 

I'm with you Neo. For recording, possibly, but I would rather mic up an amp.

 

Never on stage though, call me stupid, call me a purist, but I won't use a computer.

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I tried the computer thing and I don't like it at all.I do admit that there is alot of stuff on it I can't figure out,but thats another one of my gripes with it.I like to plug in ,turn the volume up,and le,t it rip.all the time and fiddling around with all that computer settings and all just take away from the playing time.And in the end,there is no comparison of simulated,immitated,modeling sound file bites to the real deal.

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Valve amps or nothing. The easier the better, I do fine with my Epiphone Valve Junior with just a single volume control (although I could use an attenuator to get those fantastic overdrive sounds at a lower volume).

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Lately' date=' I hear more and more about how artists should start moving towards computers instead of amplifiers, or that some artists are because its easier and cleaner and more versatile, etc...

 

Personally, I don't think I will, just something about the amplifier. Can you imagine Hendrix playing with a laptop in front of him, instead of the wall of Marshalls?

 

If it works for you, I say go for it. But as Jack White said in It Might Get Loud, "Sure, technology may get you there faster, but it doesn't help creativity."

 

Discuss please

[/quote']

 

All of the recordings I have on Soundclick were done without an amp. I just run my effect(s) directly to the computer's soundcard. I tried mic-ing an amp once, and it picked up every sound in the house, never did it again.

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I've been playing with Amplitube Metal for a couple of months now and am quite happy with the sounds I can get out it.

 

I've done directly comparisons between using it and my Peavey Classic 50 410 and I can actually get a warmer tone out of Amplitube Metal (when using their Peavey amp).

 

I just use a 25 watt Traynor bass amp when I use Amplitube. I got it quite cheap and obviously didn't need an amp with effects or even a gain channel and it works quite well.

 

But if I run Amplitube and use my Peavey 50 410 just as a speaker cabinet.... Wow! Do I ever get a great sound.

 

I bought Amplitube Metal for $100 and it was well worth it. It's great being able to use my guitar at low volume but still get the tone of a big amp --- as no matter what the volume, when using Amplitube it sounds like you're running a 100 watt amp in its sweet spot.

 

A friend of mine also bought the same as me and he's loving the program.

 

The only drawback is that if you want to use their effects --- at least in a live setting --- you'd be well advised to get their foot pedal. Having to click a mouse to turn an effect on/off isn't exactly something that's possible when playing. [biggrin]

 

I wouldn't have any problem using this program on stage --- though I'd prefer to have a laptop as opposed to my iMac.

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Hey Fred

 

Another good question. I started recording in 2002 running My Zoom 3030 into Guitar Tracks 2.

It would depend on how it sounds. I would have to hear it for myself and if it sounds like my tube

amp I'd use it. If not I'd wait till they had something that worked. Got to keep up with times, but that

doesn't mean you can't have your Tube amp at home.

 

CW

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Hey Fred

 

Another good question. I started recording in 2002 running My Zoom 3030 into Guitar Tracks 2.

It would depend on how it sounds. I would have to hear it for myself and if it sounds like my tube

amp I'd use it. If not I'd wait till they had something that worked. Got to keep up with times' date=' but that

doesn't mean you can't have your Tube amp at home.

 

CW[/quote']

 

Wait, so not everybody thinks I'm full of SHlT?!?!?!?!!?!?!!?

 

whoa

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I'm happy to use computer technology with some aspects of my music, but primarily I'm a traditionalist when it comes to tone and sound. So that being the case I'll be using the ol' tube amps until I die.

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I'll be using SS practice amps for the rest of my life. [biggrin][blink][cool]

 

OK, in all seriousness, I'm not pleased by the idea of using a computer for sound. I'd prefer to use an amp, until a system comes along that's user-intuitive enough, and that sounds good enough.

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Okay, in a sense, you can make a case that any solid state amp, and almost every stomp box is a computer of sorts.

 

I have a really nice big old tube amp that weighs way too much for me to haul most times and places. So I have a solid state that goes on a nice little suitcase cart and gets decent sound and plenty of volume about anyplace I'm likely to play. Connecting the line out to my computer works, IMHO, far better than miking the amp here in the house.

 

The big old amp does not have a line out, either, so it's not so good for recording since it'd have to be miked and, as I said, I think the mike changes stuff more than running straight into the computer for recording. In fact, I get more than enough sound for doing my stuff in a 5-600 seat auditorium from the little amp. It ain't rock or wild country, so there's no need to see if I can blow off the roof.

 

Yeah, I like the sound of the big old tube jobbie, but to me it ain't a religion. Improving my playing kind of is.

 

On the computer I don't do much "sound changing" at all.

 

One way or another, you're gonna need an amp. The computer running into a PA board is nothing more than running into a multi-effects box and/or a solid state amp and then into the PA.

 

Miking an amp is, to me, frankly more "changing" of the sound from the amp than going directly into a board or computer from the amp for recording. If that were not true, why would we have discussions here about "what's the best mike to put on your amp for recording or to run through the board?

 

Oh, and here's another: Why mike a tube amp to run through a solid state PA?

 

I dunno. Honestly, it doesn't make much difference to me one way or another. It's all a matter of trying to get the right tool to produce the sound you want for the venue you're in, whether playing live or recording.

 

m

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I would have said no as recent as a few months ago - now I,m gonna say maybe or even probably since I started working with the eleven rack I'm impressed and as soon as I figure out re amping and the settings I think it's gonna be pretty damn cool.

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I dunno...

 

Maybe I'm just a grouchy old man who likes easier alternatives to the big old tube amp and/or even small tube amp and then figuring a way to make it loud enough through some kind of PA system.

 

I've run across more than a few folks who are talking a lot about using the Bose or other outfits for acoustic or even electric gigs that combine amp and PA in a single system that has a column to project your sound into a saloon or coffeehouse or church or whatever. It's all solid state. I think you can get subwoofers for both Bose and Fishman.

 

Bottom line is that unless you've got a big amp and a relatively small room, everything's going through SS PA anyway. Mike the amp, and you've changed the sound by the qualities of the mike and its placement as well as the SS PA system.

 

Another thing I keep remembering from my own "olden days" is ongoing fear of breaking tubes during travel - I've seen it happen especially when it was -20 F and colder, but it could happen when it's far warmer. Then there was a matter of blowing fuses.

 

So... I may be an old dinosaur, but as far as I'm concerned, much as I like tube amps for PAs as well as for guitars and basses, they may not really be that "special" for creating a sound. Too many variables. Every room or even outdoor venue is going to have sufficient variation to change the perceived sound. How that sound is best transmitted to the audience ear is going to vary.

 

I think sometimes we get too picky about little distinctions in sound that very likely ain't gonna be heard by an audience anyway. So it's a matter of getting a good sound an audience can hear and enjoy rather than us being super-picky with something ain't gonna make any difference.

 

Computers? Hey, if I was comfortable with program(s) that run differently, I'd do it. It might happen, might not. But the criterion would be on a basis of practical sound quality and ease of use and schlepping whatever gear is needed.

 

m

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