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Truss rod and setup.


elvendio

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The humidity hasreally changed here in Toronto in the last month or so from like 5% back to 40% so I decided it was time to do set up.

 

I was playing with my rod and and decided to tighten for a flatter neck instead of the usual relief. The neck now plays beautifully and the action is very low but there is some buzz on the low E and G string around the 7th and 8th fret. It's not enough to pick up on an amp but my question is how much is it affecting the tone and sustain?

 

Am I substituting tonality for easy playing or is it not significant enough to raise up the action and relieve the neck to get rid of the buzz? I know ppl usually say if your amp can't pic up the buzz then don't worry about it but it's all about tone isn't it?

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Have you set the intonation ? Some times that'll cause a buzz when there's no

bend in the neck.

 

The best way to set the intonation is to fret a note on the 12 fret, then hit the harmonic

on the 12 fret the notes should be the same.

 

Test this with a tuner. If the harmonic is too sharp loosen the saddle or vice versa.

 

Good luck.

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Have you set the intonation ? Some times that'll cause a buzz when there's no

bend in the neck.

 

The best way to set the intonation is to fret a note on the 12 fret' date=' then hit the harmonic

on the 12 fret the notes should be the same.

 

Test this with a tuner. If the harmonic is too sharp loosen the saddle or vice versa.

 

Good luck.[/quote']

 

Yep I have set the intonation very accurately and I'm sure I can lose the buzz by giving the neck some bend or "relief" but in turn the strings will be higher off the frets. I know it's all personal preference and I'm just trying to find mine. I love the low action but am wondering how much it's hurting my tone?

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I have been told by a couple of guitar techs that if it does not buzz through the amp you are ok. Try different pick attacks. If it buzzes with normal attack then maybe add a little bit of relief. If it only buzzes when you play aggressively and does not come through the amp then you should be ok.

 

My guitar does the same when playing aggressively (ever so slight buzz on the G in the same area) but I hear no buzz through the amp. DOs not seem to impact sustain. Playing normally I have no buzz.

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I have been told by a couple of guitar techs that if it does not buzz through the amp you are ok. Try different pick attacks. If it buzzes with normal attack then maybe add a little bit of relief. If it only buzzes when you play aggressively and does not come through the amp then you should be ok.

 

My guitar does the same when playing aggressively (ever so slight buzz on the G in the same area) but I hear no buzz through the amp. DOs not seem to impact sustain. Playing normally I have no buzz.

 

Thanks Tom and I too have heard the same thing but I can't help thinking that if there is a buzz even if only when playing the string a bit aggressively that this is caused buy contact between the string and the fret interrupting the vibration of the string and I don't see how this can't affect the tone and sustain. But what do I know?

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Of course if it is buzzing even if you can't seem to hear it through your amp it doesn't change the fact that it is still buzzing and that will invariably affect your tone and sustain at least to some degree. It is a matter of how much you can live with.

 

So it is just a tradeoff between faster action and a buzz or higher action and less or no buzz. Maybe you can reach the right compromise, this usually is a painstaking process using truss rod adjustment to get it just right, often many small adjustments until you achieve the best trade off. Then next season comes around and you get to do it all over again. Living in Canada it becomes a constant effort as our weather & humidity changes so much.

 

If you need to know how to adjust your intonation and/or truss rod, just google it, there are lots of instructions out there to help you!

 

D

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For the most part neck relief will be on or close from the factory. The problem is changes in humidity from the time it left the factory until the time you received it. Wood is alive and will change when too dry (or too moist). Keep your guitars in the ballpark of 47 RH. Have a tech determine if you can't whether or not your neck has the proper relief or not. Too much or too little throws all else off. If you want to try it yourself, check out frets.com on the web.

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The guy doing my set ups is a God.

 

When I found him, I quit guessing.

I'll take two or three at a time to him and tell him what I've got.

He's done in half an hour.

 

A couple times he told me my guitar was fine, just play it more....

Saved me a few bucks.

 

Worth the drive into Phoenix.

 

Yes, neck relief and bridge height go hand in hand.

Any substantial changes will require intonation.

If you haven't moved the bridge, climate will affect the neck relief. Cool thing about the desert - consistent climate.

 

I rarely touch the truss rod on any of mine, choosing not to twist the truss rod unless really needed.

I've seen what happens when they break.

UGLY.

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In my opinion, any buzzing will flat-in the fretted note and yes you do loose tone if it does not ring out. If and when you flat-in your neck thru releif be real carefull, the point where its flat to the point where it goes into an overbow is real close and you never want to put your neck into an overbow. Most of the time a neck that has releif will raise your action at around the 12th fret, but overall a neck with relief allways has lower action vs a neck that's flat, you may just of had too much and didn't know it. If it's just buzz-in on a few and you really like your action where it's at, may-be you just got-it to the point where you now have noticed that those few frets are your high one's and they can be dressed to your new set-up so they will not buzz.

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