Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

STRING PROBLEM!!


atreyu260

Recommended Posts

now that i have finally bought a lp i also want to move up in sting gauge, from 10 to 11s, but a friend of mine told me that super heavy stings can warp the neck a lot and ultimately destroy it.... i would really like to use 11s for the fuller sound but i also dont want my neck to warp can does ne on know ne thing about this?? are 11s really even worth it?

 

What does everyone here play with??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have always stuck with .10's I tried .11's once but they were too heavy to do a lot of the bluesy and vibrato stuff I like to do. Great for deep heavy stuff. I have played some Zakk Wylde and Megadeth stuff with the .11's and it sounds GREAT, but I still go for the feel and stick to .10's.

 

If the guitar is set-up right, having the heavier strings should not harm it at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I hope I can help. I use .11s, specifically Ernie Ball Power Slinky. The heavier gauge

is great for playing in Drop D. No loss of tension like using .10s for Drop D or other

alternate tunings. I've done Drop B, Drop B and E and they are perfect.

 

The strings won't warp and ruin the neck. Although you'll probably have to adjust the

truss rod to compensate from the gauge change.

 

I for one have to adjust my truss rod about four times a year with the seasonal changes.

 

The .11s are only slightly thicker, you will feel the difference but you should get over it

pretty quickly.

 

Hope this helps, good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure the truss rod is correctly adjusted and think about top wrapping the strings over the tailpiece like this if you want to reduce the string tension and make the 11s feel like 10s.

 

I recall a thread regarding top wrapping, does this technique change the tone if you stay with the .10s? Or is this only to relieve string tension to preclude breaks at the bridge?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to wrap 10's over the tail piece on my sg classic ala pete townshend. Definite difference in tone. If you drop the stop bar piece as well, it can provide additional sustain. To answer the 11's question, get the guitar set up for 11's. 11's provide different string tension, almost 18 additional pounds worth, so the truss rod would need adjustment and the nut slots are cut for 10's so you may get some string slip with 11's so widen the slots slightly, do not widen them too much because if you want to go back to 10's and the way they sounded before you may be s.o.l.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure the truss rod is correctly adjusted and think about top wrapping the strings over the tailpiece like this

gibson-wrap.jpg

if you want to reduce the string tension and make the 11s feel like 10s.

 

Guys, I have to throw a flag here.

 

The only place the tension will be less is behind the bridge because they don't have as large an angle of deflection.

Between the bridge and nut, how can tension be any different if pitch is unchanged on the same scale length?

 

I don't get it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's no problem using the 11's, but If you don't tighten the truss rod the 11's with pull a large bow in the neck. I know of some that dill out the tunning pegs and go with 60's and will only do that with the Zakk Wylde model with the maple neck because of problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no issue at all using 11's if you adjust (or have someone else adjust) the truss rod, bridge height, etc. Changing string gauges requires some degree of adjustment on any guitar (more or less depending on the instrument). If you are uncomfortable with what to do, take it to a tech and have them change the string gauge and adjust the instrument at the same time. After that, stick with the the guage of strings the guitar is set up for. Going back and forth on string gauges is a exercise in frustration.

 

BTW, 11-49's are the lightest strings I use on any of my guitars. Several are 12-52's. All play beautifully (low action, great tone) because they are set up properly for the strings that are on each of them.

 

Karma

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Guys' date=' I have to throw a flag here.

 

The only place the tension will be less is behind the bridge because they don't have as large an angle of deflection.

Between the bridge and nut, how can tension be any different if pitch is unchanged on the same scale length?

 

I don't get it.[/quote']

 

You know, I wondered how people came up with that idea also. In a another discussion about the height of the tail piece some people talked about the action and string tension increasing. I'm thinking to myself, " if string tension between the bridge and nut is increasing, wouldn't the pitch go up? and then you would just tune down, decreasing the tension, until it came back in to correct tuning"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Guys' date=' I have to throw a flag here.

 

The only place the tension will be less is behind the bridge because they don't have as large an angle of deflection.

Between the bridge and nut, how can tension be any different if pitch is unchanged on the same scale length?

 

I don't get it.[/quote']

 

I'm with you NCM... It seems to me that any string at a certain pitch will put a specific amount of tesion on the neck regardless of how it's anchored at the bridge.

 

The one thing that could make a difference is the bridge height relative to the nut. Imagine a 10ft long 2x4 laying on the ground with a rope tied to one end. Pull on the rope from an inch above the opposite end of the 2x4 and it's hard to lift the 2x4 off the ground. Now do the same thing, but pull on the rope from a position 10 ft above the 2x4 and you could lift it with not much trouble.

 

Frankly though, I have a hard time imagining setting a bridge high enough that this would make a material difference.

 

Thought experiments are the best.

 

Karma

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I hope I can help. I use .11s' date=' specifically Ernie Ball Power Slinky. The heavier gauge

is great for playing in Drop D. No loss of tension like using .10s for Drop D or other alternate tunings. I've done Drop B, Drop B and E and they are perfect. The strings won't warp and ruin the neck. Although you'll probably have to adjust the truss rod to compensate from the gauge change. The .11s are only slightly thicker, you will feel the difference but you should get over it pretty quickly.[/quote']

 

Ditto me. Once you get used to the 11s, which I didn't find much of a jump, there's no problem - and I personally really like them now. I don't find it any harder to do what I always did with 10s although I'm admittedly not a shredder, playing more blues & classic/hard rock.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...