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Fretboard radius


dodgytoo
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I understand the theory and the maths behind fretboard radius measurement and the difference between a 7.25, a 9.5 and a 12 etc.

 

But does anyone have a chart that shows what Gibsons have what????

 

Fender seem to make a big deal of this in their literature but Gibson not so much?

 

Can anyone help here ?

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The old Fenders are 7.5' date=' then they moved to 12. Then they moved to 9.5. Now they're a mix of 9.5 and 12, maybe a few "vintage" at 7.5. I think Gibsons are usually 12 or 15, but I know more about Fenders than I do Gibsons.[/quote']For some reason I was thinking about Ibanez. They (and most other "shred" guitars) have a flatter (14") radius. Not a whole lot of "blues bending" going on on those guitars.
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For some reason I was thinking about Ibanez. They (and most other "shred" guitars) have a flatter (14") radius. Not a whole lot of "blues bending" going on on those guitars.

 

Flatter radius actualy make it possible to make wide bends with low action.

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That's because it's pretty much common knowledge. Most' date=' if not all Gibson guitars FBs have a radius of 12". Fenders have a 14" (flatter) raduis. [/quote']

 

+1

 

 

I've got a Jackson super Strat with a compound radius - 10" at the nut going to 16" at fret 24.

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That's because it's pretty much common knowledge. Most' date=' if not all Gibson guitars FBs have a radius of 12". [/quote']

 

 

That is correct. With a few exceptions Gibsons have a 12" radiused fingerboards. There have been Gibsons made with compound radiused fingerboards in the past (the mid 90's Jimmy Page signature model and Paul Jack Jr. Signature model are the first two that come to mind. There may be a few others others I'm forgetting.) But by and large a Gibson guitar will have a 12" fingerboard radius.

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  • 11 years later...

I'd it ok to dress the frets of a les paul from 12" to 15", I wanted to flatten out the base.of the fretboard to try and get lower action without fretting out. Ideally want to do a compound radius with 15 " to 14" to 12" any help would be appreciated. Don't watch to take to much off of it.

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1 hour ago, Johnny Guitar said:

I'd it ok to dress the frets of a les paul from 12" to 15", I wanted to flatten out the base.of the fretboard to try and get lower action without fretting out. Ideally want to do a compound radius with 15 " to 14" to 12" any help would be appreciated. Don't watch to take to much off of it.

 

No, No, and NO.  Jesus h how much "low action" do people need?

No, it's the fingerboard that is radiused, not the frets.  NO.

rct

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Most Gibson electrics have a 12 inch radius.  However there are exceptions - I have a 2017 LP Standard that came with a compound radius fingerboard.  It is a little more curved at the first few frets and then gradually flattens out as you move up the fingerboard.   So a shorter radius down low and longer radius up high on the neck.

The change is not dramatic, I'd guess a fraction of an inch from one end to the other.  But when I first got the guitar I found that with simple first position chords I was squeezing the neck harder than needed and actually pulling the strings a little out of tune.  After a week or so of easing up on it though it became very comfortable and easy to play. 

Edited by Twang Gang
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