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Scarf Joint Headstock


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Most standard (non-Elitist) Epiphones do have a scarf joint between the the headstock and the fifth fret. Sheratons and Joe Pass Emperors don't (their necks are laminated lengthwise). Some Casinos have one-piece mahogany necks without a scarf, but virtually every other one I've seen does --- Dots, SG's, Lesters, Broadways, Wildkats, EmpReege's, you name it.

 

The reasons they do it are a) it's cheaper than lengthwise laminating, B) lets them use smaller pieces of wood that might otherwise be scrap --- another cost-savings, and c) provides some resistance to warping.

 

Nothing wrong with a well-made scarf joint. Some might claim a one-piece neck is more resonant, but on an electric guitar I think the difference is pretty tiny --- variations in individual pieces of wood could make more difference.

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Most standard (non-Elitist) Epiphones do have a scarf joint between the the headstock and the fifth fret. Sheratons and Joe Pass Emperors don't (their necks are laminated lengthwise). Some Casinos have one-piece mahogany necks without a scarf' date=' but virtually every other one I've seen does --- Dots, SG's, Lesters, Broadways, Wildkats, EmpReege's, you name it.

 

This is what I was curious about; not only on the necks where you can see the scarf, like my LP, but on the ones that are painted thoroughly where you can't see the scarf; like my Dot...This kinda bolsters the Headstock choice by Gibson as well, to keep the Epiphone traditional/historical headstock, (IMO, in most cases more appealing) than put the, not so appealing Gibbo on all Epis. But, I do prefer the "open book" or "book-matched" headstock on the LP...

my LP is scarfed from the first thru the 3rd frets..........J

 

[img']http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y209/173bro/Epiguts048.jpg[/img]

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Sometimes the scarf joint is in the headstock.:

 

studiohead2.jpg

 

The Vintage G-400 was one of the few guitars to have a one-piece neck with no scarf joint. I would assume that a Sheraton, due to its laminated construction, would also be without a scarf joint. As to the rest...

 

The reason behind it is simple... it's a question of minimizing material waste. By joining a separate piece at the headstock, you don't have to use a thick piece of wood, most of which would end up in the trash. This is just one of the many ways of keeping the cost of an Epiphone down.

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But' date=' I do prefer the "open book" or "book-matched" headstock on the LP...[/quote']

 

Umm... that's not what 'book matching' refers to. Book matching is when you take a piece of wood and split it, then open the two pieces like a book so that you get matched grain patterns. They simulate this on Epiphones by using two consecutive slices of veneer, one up, one down.

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on most gibbys that is the scarf amost every gibby i say has a scarf where the horns are glued onto the headstock

 

Those are called "ears", and first, they're not scarfed, that's a straight butt joint. Secondly, that's not what we are discussing here since these ears have no effect on the structural integrity of the neck.

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Umm... that's not what 'book matching' refers to. Book matching is when you take a piece of wood and split it' date=' then open the two pieces like a book so that you get matched grain patterns. They simulate this on Epiphones by using two consecutive slices of veneer, one up, one down.[/quote']

 

Understood...I misstated. What I thought as being book matched or "open book" was the Gibby LP headstock design, as looking at a book, if you opened it in the middle and laid it on a table from an overview. Don't know what its called but obviously book matched and open book are two different animals. I remember your post on the G-400 and "the ears" and the material waste issue respective to the $$$ issue. Here CURIOSITY strikes again; Are Gibsons made with one piece neck to headstock, are they laminated and butt jointed at the headstock or is this where part of the $$$ for the Gibbo is generated. It's clear that the structural integrity of the scarf jointed neck/headstock is sound much like a "glulam" beam is considered to have a higher strength tolerance over a like piece of natural wood. Don't wanna drag this on too far, BUT, if you have a "neautral/natural" finish on a guitar you should be able to see a scarf joint at the neck or a butt joint at the headstock..Right?? Not likely that you'd have a scarfed neck to headstock and/or a butt joint from a laminated neck at the same time just to showcase the more detailed Epi headstock......(SHITE). It took me 10 minutes to confuse myself with this post.......lol BIG TIME....But I am curious............J

 

MoreEpiHeadstock009.jpg

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You are correct. Still wondering about all the other curiosities.What else does you guy know about 'em and how many other Samick's does he have or can he get. Hmmmmm........J

 

How many?

 

He sells the SAMICK "Greg Bennett's" brand almost exclusively (Acoustics) in his shop. They're not bad guitars, "bang for the buck" really.

 

For electrics he sells, Samick GB stuff and ESP/LTD stuff. Just about every guitar in his store has that neck joint.

 

My Epi LP Custom Cherryburst has it and so did a MIK Fender DG24 I had. There's a ton of stuff that comes out of that Samick factory.

 

guess I'm not sure what your asking for.......???

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The majority of the time most imports will have a scarf, no scarf is the exception.

 

As far as Samick, they also used a higher up joint sometimes, I have the prototype for the Greg Bennett LP and the joint is up farther across the 2 bottom tuners:

 

 

 

 

 

Picture%20091.jpg

 

Picture%20100.jpg

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Are Gibsons made with one piece neck to headstock' date=' are they laminated and butt jointed at the headstock or is this where part of the $$$ for the Gibbo is generated. It's clear that the structural integrity of the scarf jointed neck/headstock is sound much like a "glulam" beam is considered to have a higher strength tolerance over a like piece of natural wood. Don't wanna drag this on too far, BUT, if you have a "neutral/natural" finish on a guitar you should be able to see a scarf joint at the neck or a butt joint at the headstock..Right??[/quote']

 

Gibson makes their necks from one piece of wood, then they butt join two small pieces to either side of the headstock to widen it. FWIW many guitar manufacturers do this, including Martin. It's really inconsequential since these pieces are 100% decorative, however I understand that a lot of Martin owners have been whining about it.

 

hsears.jpg

 

...a little hard to see here through the cinammon finish which is not very transparent.

 

Any headstock joint as seen on Epiphones will be a scarf joint; all this refers to is a slanted cut used to priovide a nice large surface area for the glue joint. Such a joint is typically stronger than the wood it's made of. And yes, if the finish has any degree of transparency you should be able to see these joints.

 

And BTW 'open book' is the correct terminology; it's also sometimes referred to as a 'moustache'.

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Well, my Casino must be the exception, because there's no joint at all.. Neither in the neck or headstock... It's all one piece...

 

But upon closer inspection, I discovered a very irregular joint in the headstock of my Dot, bellow the tuners.... I had to cover the flash on my camera to get it to show up..

 

Dotneck.jpg

 

That's odd...

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Sometimes the scarf joint is in the headstock.:

 

Yup, that's where mine appears to have a scarf joint on my LP .... shall try to post a pic if my camera ever re-appears..... It seems to run from the bottom of the headstock (from the rear, right where the neck meets it) running to the front just above the E string tuners. Looks kind of "short," but can't find any evidence of one anywhere else on the neck. Interesting thread, as I doubt I'd have really noticed it, beings as the grain and color are very similar on both sides of the joint. Guess I learned my something for today #-o
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Hi everyone. This is my first post so hopefully I get the pictures right. =D>

 

I have two Epi's, a Dot and a LP Standard + top, both built at the Qingdao plant, and both with scarf joints in the headstock. Color and grain matches very well. The photo's are of the LP but the scarf joint looks pretty much the same on the Dot.

 

Brian

 

Headstock Side

 

Headstock Back

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I have two Epi's' date=' a Dot and a LP Standard + top, both built at the Qingdao plant, and both with scarf joints in the headstock. Color and grain matches very well. The photo's are of the LP but the scarf joint looks pretty much the same on the Dot.

 

 

[/quote'] Hey, Brian, thanks for posting the pics - yup, that's basically the same as on my Qingdao LP, as well.

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