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removing scratches from pick guard?


ken361

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We used to make plastic rings back in the day. HS shop.

and you could buff them out right pretty. but I think that was a much harder plastic.

maybe I'll experiment with some of the pieces I've got from scratch builds and see what I can come up with.

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Wha????

 

plastics are long polymer chains that entangle with themselves. Harder plastics are longer polymer chains (really freaking knotted up) and don't flex as well.

 

A plastic solvent causes these chains to detangle, making them move as a liquid. A weak solvent will make the plastic soft and clay like; a strong one will liquify it. Usually the solvent doesn't disrupt the molecular bonds; the plastic melts, and then hardens again when the solvent evaporates and the chains settle and tangle up again.

 

So yeah. Use a weak solvent to make the pick guard malleable; smooth it out; then let it harden and buff it.

 

Simple, right??

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Start off with the belt sander and some 100 grit sand paper.

 

Then, after about 20-30 minutes, go to the 120 grit.

 

After about 20-30 minutes of that, work your way to heavy-grade buffing compound.

 

I would apply at least 17 coats of the compound, buffing through each coat.

 

Next, get some cotton swabs and mineral oil and rub the oil in thoroughly. . .for about an hour.

 

Last, apply several coats of Armoral. I usually do at least 42 coats.

 

Works like a charm.

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plastics are long polymer chains that entangle with themselves. Harder plastics are longer polymer chains (really freaking knotted up) and don't flex as well.

 

A plastic solvent causes these chains to detangle' date=' making them move as a liquid. A weak solvent will make the plastic soft and clay like; a strong one will liquify it. Usually the solvent doesn't disrupt the molecular bonds; the plastic melts, and then hardens again when the solvent evaporates and the chains settle and tangle up again.

 

So yeah. Use a weak solvent to make the pick guard malleable; smooth it out; then let it harden and buff it.

 

Simple, right??[/quote']

 

Thanks for the science lesson, Mr. Wizard... But I've worked with a lot of solvents and plastics, and that won't work.

 

If you put any kind of solvent that's capable of dissolving plastic on a pickguard, all you're going to do is ruin the surface.. And there aint any amount of buffing that's gonna bring it back...

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OK, I'll be serious. There are some products at your local auto parts store that are specifically for polishing plastic and minimizing scratches. I've been using it for years on lots of stuff, even eyeglass lenses. Works great!

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Don't even think about taking a belt sander to your guitar. That's way to heavy metalheadish. Talk about relicing. I could really relic your guitar for you with a belt sander and about 60 grit belts. I could have a lot of fun. I'd do it for 100 dollars, you pay the shipping. I'll even touch up the metal parts and everything. When I'm done I'll make it look professional and antique it with a spray can of clear lacquer.

 

To clean up just the pickguard why not just buy a new one. Also, if things are attached, it might be a good time to upgrade some pickups, pots, switches, etc. Be a good excuse to upgrade some things.

 

Duffy

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Meguiars and Mothers make great stuff...without question. But for plastics, use one of these two ideas: Easy to find and cheap...Brasso, yes the metal polish. Read the label, great on plastic watch crystals. There's a local ambulance service here that's been using the stuff for years on emergency light rotator lenses...It Works! Much harder to find but does a better job and costs more .... Novus plastic polishes, (www.novuspolish.com), using polish #2 and cleaner #1 you'll probably take your guard back to as new condition. If that doesn't get all of them out: back up to polish #3. Normally you'll have to get this at a plastic supply warehouse but contact the company for distributors. Ain't found nuthin' that will beat this stuff. Hopefully your guard isn't housing pickups, if it isn't, remove the guard, spread product into a folded cotton or microfiber towel laid flat on a table to fully support it. (Dampen a spot about the size of the pickguard): Lay pickguard scratched face down into the dampened spot and rub forward and back vigorously. Check progress and apply more product to dampened spot in the toweling as needed. Using this method you can really put some leverage into the polishing aspect. It will take some effort but short of actuall machine buffing, (which can get dicey at times), the Novus is the way to go. Bottles can be bought as small as an ounce or two so all three steps can be had for about the price of a Dunlop gutiar cleaning/maintenance kit. That said there's probably a bottle of Brasso under your kitchen sink right now. Wedgie

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Thanks for the help! I have a new iommi and it's black, when I got it sent here from gt center it had some scuffs. The guy at gt cener says they use turtle wax rubbing compound on some of there new guitars and it works very nice and it did, but got some on my guard and it looks kinda shitty on black.

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I want my guitars to look beat up, that's what tells you that it's a good guitar. Good guitars get beat up from getting played so much. Plus, it makes it look older. At Daddy's Junky music (store chain in NE) I saw an 80's Epi lP that was scratched and beat all over,but it played great (Although it needed to be set up, and could use new strings and a new nut.)

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