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string resonance problem? (g-400)


snowman

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I am just starting guitar, so maybe this is just something all guitars do and I just don't know it, but...

 

I am having a problem with string resonance on the new G-400 I just bought (black, in case you wonder). If I leave all strings "open" and play the high E string, it lightly vibrates the low E and the A strings, which is very easy to hear through an amp. The tone is very high; like an overtone.

 

I know its not the amps cause I can hear it unplugged (though not as easily), and if I touch the low E or A string, I feel them vibrate. I can also feel the neck vibrate faintly when this happens. I have lowered the pickups until the ajustment screws almost fell off and it had no affect. In fact, putting the pickups as close to the strings as possible seems to help, as it picks up more of the picked note tone than the resonating strings' tones. If I play other notes, its fine, but once I hit an E again, it happens (like when I play E at the 5th fret of the B string). The neck was originally straight, and I gave it about a 1/10th to 1/8th of a turn of relief, but that didn't change anything (though I like the action much more with the relief). For each string (and only one at a time), I've loosened them so they easily come out of the nut and off the bridge saddles. I've used a pencil to put some graphite in the nut slots and on the saddles. Still nothing. I did notice that the low E and A bridge saddles were a little loose in the direction perpendicular to the neck axis. But the same was true for the G string saddle, and that one doesn't seem to have the problem (it in fact appears to have the best sustain of all the strings). My action at the 12th fret is set to a hair under 3/64" on the treble side and a hair under 5/64" on the bass side (again, I have just a touch of relief in the neck). Everything on the guitar is as bought; I've replaced nothing yet.

 

Can anyone help me? Has anyone experienced or even heard of this? I'm really enjoying my guitar, but this problem is driving me up a wall! Is this something inherent to guitars that I just have to live with?

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

Thanks

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I did notice that the low E and A bridge saddles were a little loose in the direction perpendicular to the neck axis. But the same was true for the G string saddle' date=' and that one doesn't seem to have the problem (it in fact appears to have the best sustain of all the strings).

[/quote']

 

I really think this is the source of the problem. Why it doesn't happen on the G-string is beyond my knowledge of physics. I suppose string tension, and or transfer of frequency may have something to do with it, not sure.

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Probably just that guitar's natural resonant frequencies which are being excited.

All guitars will to some degree exhibit resonant peaks and relative dead spots at certain frequencies.

With the E & A strings you have common harmonic nodes which will sound in sympathy if the guitar is excitable at those key frequencies.

Some instruments are livelier than others and will exhibit more pronounced resonant behaviour. Some of it is a function of the design and some just down to natural varience in the wood.

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I am having a problem with string resonance on the new G-400 I just bought (black, in case you wonder). If I leave all strings "open" and play the high E string, it lightly vibrates the low E and the A strings, which is very easy to hear through an amp. The tone is very high; like an overtone

 

so what?

I mean.. you hit a string.. the other strings are open. you hear some sympathetic vibration.

It ought to do that.

They all do that.

the strings vibrate sympathetically.. I don't know of a way around it besides damping the strings you don't want to hear.

 

Maybe I'm missing something, but it seems to me you're hitting a string and holding the guitar.. strings all open.. and hearing just exactly what sounds will happen when anyone does that.

Try playing!

*g*

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Well these sympathetic vibrations don't interfere with the tuning, though I will begin dampening other strings when tuning. However, this sympathetic vibration is far more pronounced than others. Any "E" I play that is not on the 6th string "leaps out" of the music as though I've picked it harder than the other notes, when I haven't. Is there some way to decrease the vibrations in this instance?

 

Thanks for the replies. Its helpful to know that this is not a "problem" but more of the nature of a guitar.

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With the E & A strings you have common harmonic nodes which will sound in sympathy if the guitar is excitable at those key frequencies.

 

Yes, I have the same problem now since installing a sustainer. My LP gets so excited, I just have to slap her silly!

(with my palm..of course)

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I am just starting guitar' date=' so maybe this is just something all guitars do and I just don't know it, but...

 

I am having a problem with string resonance on the new G-400 I just bought (black, in case you wonder). If I leave all strings "open" and play the high E string, it lightly vibrates the low E and the A strings, which is very easy to hear through an amp. [/quote']

 

Pick up a book on lead guitar, like Troy Stetina's "Metal Lead Primer," at your library or for $20 on Amazon. The first few pages are about tuning, holding the guitar, etc; and then muting techniques (for like 1 paragraph). The strings will ring from harmonic resonance, or from you barely touching them on the way past, or shaking the guitar a little.

 

Alternately, find someone who can actually play (i.e. not me) and ask them. I'm actually working out that route too but I have no social life (at work all the time @_@)

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Of course YOU realize, but I'm not sure I did, not entirely. You could do everything right and wind up with a guitar that's almost, but not quite, right. And even if its done exactly the same, by machine, time after time, the gestalt, mojo, whatever, only strikes when everything else is also exactly perfect. Oh, pity that poor G# guitar. Nobody will ever, quite, love it enough to keep it one moment longer than necessary.

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This is a huge factor with all guitars...it almost defines them.

It's why I'll always choose guitars after playing them... and hearing and feeling how they respond.

I might fancy a Strat, or an ES, or a Tele...but if I play half a dozen I might end up liking one theoretically identical example much more than another. Most any modern production guitar can be set up to play and feel wonderfully well...but the voice of that particular chunk of wood can neither be predicted nor altered.

That's the downside of so many guitars being sold by mail order or over the net these days.

Folks don't don't try so many guitars on a dealer's wall and get to quickly pick up on how differently we can respond to two individual insruments of the same type.

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