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Non Epi topic: Effects Pedals...daisy chained 110 Vs. Batteries....


charlie brown

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We all know the 110 to 9v converter is the route to go, as opposed to

changing batteries, all the time, for economics sake, anyway.

But, recently, I got a multi-connector and 110 to 9V converter, and...not being an electrician

or even much of a pedal user, I was astounded, at the difference in the way I had to set knobs

on the pedals, compared to how they'd been set, using fresh batteries, to get the same sound.

In all honesty, some pedals seemed to be about the same, setting wise, but others were

WAY different. The "Tone," sometimes varied a lot, too. Is this common,

or...??? It's a Boss converter, with boss daisy chain cord, and into Boss

Pedals.

 

CB

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CB, It was common to me when I went the same way. I hardly ever use pedals. It was such a pain as a matter of fact that I got tired of messing with it that I finally just put the whole mess on CL and got rid of everything but a Wah and a Boss AC3, but then, like I said, I'm not really into pedals. I do have an old original Jordan boss Tone fuzz that plugs directly into the guitar and a vintage National Siren Wah that produces the hurricane and surf sounds of "Closer to Home" just for grins.

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Yeah, depending on one's needs/style...it's hard to beat just a good amp and guitar, huh?

But, like you, I do like to use a few, at times. Was thinking about just getting a floor processor, but so

many have WAY more stuff, than I would ever need/use! A couple of my

friends have them, and they've about decided to go back to individual

pedals, for various reasons, instead. So...???

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I have a Korg Toneworks pedel that has bunches of fx's. Not something you would want to gig with (would look like one of those spainish dancer trying to find the next fx), but a hell of a lot of fun to just screw around with sometimes...lol

Does have pre sets, which if you only want 3 or 4 pedel styles can load up easy enough.

Most times I just play straight into the amp unless I am not wanting to annoy anyone then I use the pedel to drive my lil mini amp(stereo PC speakers) or head phones.

Capt

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We all know the 110 to 9v converter is the route to go' date=' as opposed to

changing batteries, all the time, for economics sake, anyway.

But, recently, I got a multi-connector and 110 to 9V converter, and...not being an electrician

or even much of a pedal user, I was astounded, at the difference in the way I had to set knobs

on the pedals, compared to how they'd been set, using fresh batteries, to get the same sound.

CB[/quote']

 

That's the main problem with the cheap dc converters. Most of them are not regulated and the

transformer windings inside are only capable of carrying a few milliamps, so the voltage drops

below the normal 9volts that the pedals are designed to work off. Even then there

is some rectified AC ripple present. I tried this with a compressor/sustainer and ended up using

the 9V battery because of some hum present as well.

 

The only way IMO, you can run a chain of pedals is to have a custom made 9V power supply that

is regulated for 2-3 amps. That usually involves a 10-12volt transformer, a filter cap, and a monolithic

IC regulator. That will drive more than one pedal and be as quiet as the 9V battery.

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I have a couple of pedal boards. I prefer to use the clean channel and add the overdrive. I have 13 pedals on each board. I use 2 1-Spots and then I daisy chain them together on each board. That is more than enough juice for my pedals. The only problem I have ever had is that because I don't unplug the 1/4" jacks anymore they sometimes get oxidized. I'm not an electrician, so this may not be the correct term. Anyway, I have to take the 1/4" jacks out once a year, clean them up and put them back in. Then I am ready to go for another year.

 

As far as the difference in sound from 9 volt to a converter, I don't know. I haven't used batteries in over 30 years, so I don't remember. If there is, the lack of a hassle of dead batteries is well worth it to me.

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Roland makes different types of adapters. Usually they recommend the PSA-120T, which is regulated. However these only develop about 200 mA, which is enough for maybe three pedals at one time... if you have more than that switched on then you may get some problems. The BCB-60 pedal board by Roland comes with a 1,000 mA adapter.

 

Sometimes you get problems with 'interaction'... for instance my DOD Milkbox compressor does not like to be on the same power supply as my BBE pedals, and even with its own dedicated wallwart it still hums a lot; I may have to break the ground connection between it and the BBE Overdrive to get rid of all the hum.

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Yeah....it's strange. I didn't experience a drop in power or settings that had to be more/higher, with AC than batteries...it was the opposite. I had to tone down the settings, if anything. Maybe having a constant non-depleting power supply, just "woke them up?" LOL! Anyway...it was a fairly easy adjustment...just in interesting phenomenon, which...since it was my first encounter with a voltage adapter/daisy chain connectors, was a bit of a surprise. That's all... But, that's what keeps it fun, and intesting!

 

CB

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