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I'm redoing my Casino. Should I go all the way - and refinish?


Redddog

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Just a thought. I have a great luthier in town that I'm sure could do it. I'm not terribly found of that thick poly finish and I'm sure the nitro would be nice.

 

I'm doing the nut, tuners, pups, bigsby, pots, input, switch, knobs saddles - everything. Is it too much trouble to go the distance and get the refinish?

 

I dunno. I've been looking around and there aren't too many cases.

 

What do you guys think? Should I just leave well enough alone?

 

BTW. While I was looking around I came across a youtube of a tribute of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" with Paul Gilbert . Holy Mother. Has anyone seen that?

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Normally, I would strongly vote against the refin.

 

Given all the other stuff you're doing though, and the fact you want to go Nitro with it, I would vote yes.

 

Pa-lease post up pics of the progress. I'd love to see how it goes from start to finish. . .literally. :-k

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If a luthier is doing it, rather than you doing it yourself, I'd say go for it.

 

I would hate for you to try it, and ruin a perfectly good guitar.

 

[EDIT] By the way, who are you using?

 

I may be acquiring a 1966 Gibson LG-0, and it could use a tiny bit of work. "Luthier" isn't something you find in the yellow pages.

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I have checked into that. Here in the Bay Area, I was quoted $57/hour for the attempt to remove the old poly finish. No guarantees, minimum 4 hours initial attempt. I've been working on it myself ever since (well, off and on) and have over 12 hours in it right now. Half stripped.

 

Now you can get into it with both eyes open.

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I think it's more about whether you want to spend the cash rather than it is the trouble. Might be a good thing to have done while your getting the other parts together. It would be really interesting to see what the nitro does to the overall tone although you're already changing it with the other stuff.

 

Make sure you see examples of his work before you commit to having him do it and, if you decide to do it, start a thread with pics all the way through ! Good luck.

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Well, if you DO decide to have it refinished, yourself, or by a "Luthier," tread carefully. Those laminates

are pretty thin, and easily sanded through, if not careful. (Memories, of a past bad experience, with a so

called "Luthier.") Some may use paint strippers, but that can damage/glue joints and binding. So, it's not

for the faint of heart, or inexperienced. But, the results, if done well, can be quite spectacular, both in

appearance, and tone. So...good luck!

 

CB

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Ehhh... While I will agree that a nitro finish will definitely add to the illusion that the guitar is of 'high quality' I think that the expense would not be justified in light of the fact that it'll still have the sound of cheap industrial plywood with a lauan neck. My take on Epis is that it's not so much the finish as it is the materials (woods) that are the weak spot. But I may be wrong. Nevertheless my impression is that this is a textbook case of turd polishing... if you do it yourself it's not necessarily a bad thing but to pay a luthier $$$ to do it for you strikes me as a huge waste of money. Probably would make more sense to sell it and get an Elitist.

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Mostly the point of refinishing is to get the poly paint OFF the guitar because its thick, plastic ooze is thought to dampen resonance and other good stuff. Nitro is not only thinner in application, it doesn't seal the wood, so improved tone. The only thing you'll from painting nitro over top of poly is a guitar you wish you had left alone.

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Yeah, thats what I was thinking. The poly removal was the real motivation here. It seems like it may be more than it's worth. If what RotcanX says is true and the wood sucks, in general, I may be over doing it on the overhaul.

 

I happen to think that RotcanX seems to be a bit hard on the MIK/MIC epis but thats fine.

 

I think I'll see how the other upgrades work out before I go hog wild. At some point, you can spend enough on upgrades to equal the cost of an elitist.

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This poly finish (plastic) on the imports is a bear to remove...I even used chemicals once (instructions said wipe on, let set for a few minutes and wipe off) yeah right :-) That stuff didnt even phase that coating.

 

I think it may be the same material used in those huge clear paper weights...you know, the ones with the

dollar bill DEEP inside the cube :-)

 

I ended up sanding, sanding and sanding more to get it off...whew- what a job. Probably won't do that again.

And the dust created by all that sanding is probably not good for you...with all those chemicals being reduced to friable particles.

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NC lacquer on top of polyurethane = orange peel nightmares, there are strippers made specifically for polyurethane, once you have it stripped you could take it to furniture finisher (of which there are no shortage) - could be a less expensive way for a professional finish.

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NC lacquer on top of polyurethane = orange peel nightmares' date=' there are strippers made specifically for polyurethane, once you have it stripped you could take it to furniture finisher (of which there are no shortage) - could be a less expensive way for a professional finish. [/quote']

 

Woudn't that Poly-specific stripper reek havoc on the binding?

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Sorry, good point - polyurethane should have read polyester - the type I've used did not affect glue, it's used in the furniture industry all the time, plastic bindings might suffer though, you'd have to test it.

 

My only point was really that if you did remove the finish yourself, a furniture re-finisher might be the cheapest way for professional finish - as opposed to someone who specializes in instruments. Also, someone who has experience re-finishing furniture will know how to deal with the contaminated surfaces of your guitar, silicone, oils etc.. these can cause all sorts of finish problems like "fish-eyes" and so on.

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