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Interpol - Kessler's Epiphone 'casiera'


obstacle3

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Can anybody shed some light on Daniel Kessler of Interpol's co called 1967 casino.

 

Ive heard it referred to as a 'casiera' due to the pickups and the distance the neck goes into the body being more like a riviera than a casino.

 

Anybody know what it actually is? A google image search of Daniel Kessler will bring up a pic.

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Well, not sure which photos, your referring to, because I've seen a maroon casino, a red (Gibson) ES-330 (long neck),

and what appears to be a Riviera. Sorry...

If you could post the actual photo, your curious about, maybe I/we can be a bit more help?

 

Cheers,

CB

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the guitar that appears to be a riviera is the one in question. Ill post some more details tonight when I have access to photos etc. Its an interesting case, its a "hybrid' type guitar..half casino, half riviera

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Can anybody shed some light on Daniel Kessler of Interpol's co called 1967 casino.

 

Ive heard it referred to as a 'casiera' due to the pickups and the distance the neck goes into the body being more like a riviera than a casino.

 

Anybody know what it actually is? A google image search of Daniel Kessler will bring up a pic.

 

Looks to me like a late 60's Casino with a 19th fret neck/body joint and a Frequensator tail piece which they did use on some Casinos at that point in time.. In about 1968 after Norlin started its takeover there were cost cutting attempts such as standardizing the neck joints on the Casinos and ES-330's which normally joined at the 16th fret and this didn't last long because it changed both the sound and feel of these guitars and after the outcry from the public they offered the 16 fret joint as an option for the final year or so of the Casino (discontinued in 1970) and the last three years of the ES-330 (discontinued in 1972). This was also when they started using that horrible walnut-colored stain on the tops as well as the backs so they could use crappy looking wood for the tops. The Norlin era was not a good time for Gibson/Epiphone and some of the things they did were down-right revolting. Today you can pick up the 19th fret Casinos and ES-330's for a lot cheaper than the 16th fret version because they aren't very desirable in the vintage game and they do feel and sound different.

 

 

Speaking of Epiphone weirdness...here's a mid 60's Riviera that was ordered with full-sized humbuckers and an ES-335 pickguard:

 

[/img]Photo2_93e23-Original.jpg

 

...and Al's your uncle.

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This was also when they started using that horrible walnut-colored stain on the tops as well as the backs so they could use crappy looking wood for the tops. The Norlin era was not a good time for Gibson/Epiphone and some of the things they did were down-right revolting.

 

They were using that "horrible" dark walnut stain on the backs in '67 as well. My '67 Epi Triumph (acoustic) had

flat sawn maple and that dark stain on the back , which IMO, deteriorated from a otherwise nicely done vintage

burst on the carved spruce top and maple sides.

 

Incidently, I noticed in the picture that someone had used a Gibson adjustable pickguard bracket on that

particular Riviera...I can't remember if Gibson/Epiphone issued pickguard brackets using the round rod

adjustable bracket or the flat style bracket back then.

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