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Guitar solos you gave up on


tom nair

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We have all had them. These days I lean towards my own riffs and having much more fun. However, one that comes to me was Sushine of you love. I could never pull that one off no matter what I did. Clapton is just so down and dirty on that baby. On the turn around chords he just seems to connect it so well as if he did not know the turn around was even happening.

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I ain't a bad slide player but...."just got paid" and one or two of Duane's tunes baffle the living hell out of me.

 

CORRECTION,.... according to the wife, dogs, and cats, my slide work sucks, except when I'm playing the Dobro.

 

I don't know why, but the Dobro causes women to take their clothes off.

 

THANK YOU GOD!!!!!!

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Possibly my all time favorite solo is from The Pretenders' Kid. It took me ages to get anywhere close to working it out. Then one day I bought a guitar mag and lo and behold - song of the month was Kid, with the solo tabbed out. It still took me a while, but now I got it down. And I mean down!

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used to worry about that....but, after seeing most of my "hero's" live...I stopped. They NEVER played their solos,

exactly like the record. But, then, most of them are more improv type players, and do it from their "hearts," so

it's always different, but they were always GREAT, too! So, as long as it "fits," I don't worry too much about

playing "exactly like the record," anymore. I guess, if I were in a "tribute" band, I might be more inclined

to do it as accurately, as possible. But, for me...it's more fun to cop some licks or phrases, and/or

make up my own, when possible, and then put them into something different, that still works.

 

CB

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I guess I'm different than most in this respect. When I started playing 44 years ago, for the first few years I used to sit for hours going over and over, wearing out records learning my favorites note for note. Then when I started playing in bands and playing clubs, I just played what felt right during the breaks. some stuff the way I first heard it, alot of it a combination of what I'd heard and what I could add to the mix.

 

Nowadays, I just play stuff I like and play what comes. I haven't worried about or am interested in playing anything the way it's recorded any more. I enjoy listening to my favorite artists and others for what they do, the way they do it. It tends to take the enjoyment out of it for me to attempt to do something that's someone elses, the way they do it. More times than not, I would probably end up frustrated anyway and really take the enjoyment out of it.

 

Kind of like Tom said about Sunshine of your Love. I've been able to play the notes since the year the song came out - but I will never sound like Eric if I played for another 40 years. Life is too short, I want enjoy playing these days. I worked at it too hard for many years and lost alot of the enjoyment at that time as a result. Never again !

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Well, if we must...."Eight Miles High," and "Crossroads," were always a couple.

Have always had the basics, or signature licks down, but some of the phrasing

is less than "perfect" to the records. And...after seeing them (and others) "live"

many times, you come to appreciate what's done in the moment, and that what's

on any record, is just "that" particular "take!" But, since that's the "take" we

(most likely) FIRST heard, that's the one that sticks!

And, I too, will never be Roger McGuinn, or EC...or anyone...but me. So...Now,

I just play, and have a ball. And you know what, I still get complements on

those songs, even though they are not "note for note!" People still seem to

get what they need/want from hearing them. So, that's good!!

 

CB

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two things come to mind..

here comes the sun

and

mother natures son.

 

they just didn't sound right.. maybe it was me.. but they both seemed to require two guitars to get close enough for happiness.

 

I keep meaning to go back and try 'em again.

but they just didn't convey what I wanted from the tune on one guitar.

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This topic is interesting to me.... I've been practicing one of these for the last week....I have a couple: Both from Steely Dan but two different guitarists.......

 

"Kid Charlemagne": Larry Carlton, still my all time favorite solo. At the time, I just couldn't grab it. STILL can't. I've worn out various copies of "Royal Scam" over the years.

 

"Reelin In The Years": Elliot Randall, (FROM WIKIPEDIA: Legendary Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page has said that Randall's solo on Reelin' in the Years is his favorite guitar solo of all-time) I've been working on this for the last week...My wife says it sounds really good.........BUT....only half a cigar so far...........J

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This topic is interesting to me.... I've been practicing one of these for the last week....I have a couple: Both from Steely Dan but two different guitarists.......

 

"Kid Charlemagne": Larry Carlton' date=' still my all time favorite solo. At the time, I just couldn't grab it. STILL can't. I've worn out various copies of "Royal Scam" over the years.

 

"Reelin In The Years": Elliot Randall, (FROM WIKIPEDIA: Legendary Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page has said that Randall's solo on Reelin' in the Years is his favorite guitar solo of all-time) I've been working on this for the last week...My wife says it sounds really good.........BUT....only half a cigar so far...........J[/quote']

 

Yup I feel your pain....Larry makes it sound so easy and fluid.....Well it ain't when I play it! I've got Reelin' down pretty well too though.....I think that ones alot easier.

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One that I keep coming back and fooling around with is "Let it Be"...any of the versions. The notes aren't that tough but I can't get it to sound right. A Leslie alone on slow doesn't get enough warble, fast gets too much. The closest I've gotten is part of the signal to a Leslie and part to an amp. My phrasing on it could stand a little improvement too.

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Back about 1980 my ex-wife's best friend was dating one of the guys in REO Speedwagon ( Neil somebody) and as a result we managed to get invited to an after party where I found myself talking to Gary Richrath who was the lead guitar player. I confess I probably wouldn't even have known anything about these guys but I was desperately trying to get hired by a band and one of the audition songs was "Back On The Road Again" and I had spent days going over and over every nuance of that song's solo and I really thought I'd nailed it but there's some changes in tone and timing that are almost impossible to cop exactly but damn, did I try. I thought it went well at my audition. I don't remember exactly what else I had to learn but "Back On" was the one that gave me fits. All I knew is that the guy who recorded the original was "Gary Richrath so when I got introduced to him at the party the first thing I said was "whoa...I've got a question for you..." when I told him he laughed and said "I don't even try to play that solo live...that's about four different takes mixed and edited into one"..I didn't get hired by that band and even though they were going through a hot streak at the time six months later they'd disappeared so I don't feel so bad...after that I never again tried to copy a solo for a cover note for note...a few years later I met Clapton and he said pretty much the same thing...capture the themes and color within the lines as much as you can but don't try to clone it.

 

Someone earlier mentioned "Sunshine Of Your Love"...EC himself told me that originally he had that solo all worked out but when it came time to record he went a bit "out there and found himself playing "Blue Moon"..and it worked and it was a funny contrast to "Sunshine" so they kept the "Blue Moon" theme when he re-did it. That is a solo I've never been able to get my head around either.

 

 

...and Al's your uncle

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Kid Charlemagne by Steely Dan.....I have pieces of it together but I just don't phrase it smoothly](*' date=') '](*,)

 

I think that's the only one I DO have down! :-

 

Still trying to work my way through "Room 335".....

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Thanks for the replies. I thought some of you would own up to this one. The thing we picked up on is that you can beat your head against a wall trying to copy verbatum a solo but something just is not right. I will bet that some of the most famous musicians could not nail one of our improvised solos as well. It is at times very frustrating to hear a solo that blows our mind but lets face it, if you can pick up the flavor and all out devotion and creativity that the best have to offer, some of that will wear off on us. I spent way to many years copying solos and never spent time developing my own chops. I have spent the last four years playing my own stuff to jam tracks, CDs and what ever I can find to inspire me to play and be myself. The best guitarists only studied their Icons for a brief period before working thier own stuff out. The question I have is what made them stop copying so soon. Thanks

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" Feels So Good " by Chuck Mangione, the guitar solo in that tune is nut's! I'm in awe every single time I hear it. The first 8 bars or so are fairly simple, then the guy just go's off. That dude leaves me in the pasture steppin' in my own patties!

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