Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

painting issues/finishing on my project LP?


mrjones200x

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

Am just finishing painting my LP this week, got the red coat to finish, just wondered do i have to wet rub down then buff it up then laquer it after? I have 1500 grit paper and wire wool too

 

Do i need a buffing compond? Will it leave a residue on the paint? Will i still be able to laquer over it? I know i can use a compond on the laquer to bring it to shine just unsure how to finish the paint before the laquer.

 

Any help would be great. Thanks

 

Any good buffing componds you can name too

 

Thanks again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi' date='

 

Am just finishing painting my LP this week, got the red coat to finish, just wondered do i have to wet rub down then buff it up then laquer it after? I have 1500 grit paper and wire wool too

 

Do i need a buffing compond? Will it leave a residue on the paint? Will i still be able to laquer over it? I know i can use a compond on the laquer to bring it to shine just unsure how to finish the paint before the laquer.

 

Any help would be great. Thanks

 

Any good buffing componds you can name too

 

Thanks again[/quote']

 

What's the 'red coat" consist of? If it's an analine (water based) stain, or a shaded

lacquer (Stew-Mac sells), then you are ok to lacquer after it dries,

but don't use any oil based stains or opaque paints first, then expect to lacquer on top

of these..the underlying finish will crinkle and lift and you could have a mess.

The VOC (volatile organic compound) have some chemicals in it that could lift paint.

Most commercial suppliers (DEFT etc) are switching to non-VOC lacquers that have

a different chemical composition and more friendly to the environment and your

health. The traditional nitro-cellulose is tricky to apply and you need a lot of

ventilation and a chemical mask..it will give you a headache very quickly!

 

While steel wool #0000 can give you a smooth finish, the big problem is that

tiny fibers get broken off and get into cracks or areas that are hard to get rid of it.

You can vacumn or blow most of them off with an air gun, but using a graduated

wet paper (Norton) is the best way. I generally use #400 to #600 and go up to

a #1000 for inbetween coats. #1500 is more of a polishing paper for the top coats.

 

You don't need buffing compound on the base coats. If you use nitro or an equivalent

non-VOC laquer top coat, you might need some buffing compound for the last coat, and

with lacquer, you need to apply more than one coat..otherwise you could buff through

it in some spots if you lean too hard on the buffing wheel/pad or whatever you use.

As far as polishing compounds, check out H0813 Yellow fine polishing compound for instruments

(Grizzly industrial.com).

 

The important thing with lacquers is having a clean dry residue free surface that is dust free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers mate, the red coat is the last colour im putting on so will be a finished coat. It has stripes also from other coats which are still masked up ready for removal after the red has been done and dried.

 

So if i just finish the the last coat which is red then i can sand with the 1500 wet paper to remove any inperfections. Can i buff with just a cloth or do i need a compound of some type (Depending on paint type). Then i laquer to finish.

 

Im using plastie-cotie paint or something like that. Its at work so cant remember the spelling or what it made off.

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers mate' date=' the red coat is the last colour im putting on so will be a finished coat. It has stripes also from other coats which are still masked up ready for removal after the red has been done and dried.

 

So if i just finish the the last coat which is red then i can sand with the 1500 wet paper to remove any inperfections. Can i buff with just a cloth or do i need a compound of some type (Depending on paint type). Then i laquer to finish.

 

Im using plastie-cotie paint or something like that. Its at work so cant remember the spelling or what it made off.

 

Thanks

[/quote']

 

From the sounds of the description, it's some kind of urethane paint/coating. Do NOT paint over with with a

lacquer based finish..especially nitro-cellulose..the lacquer will more than likely lift it

and cause wrinkling leaving you with a real mess. If your red coat is urethane (plastic)

then stay with a urethane plastic clear coat.

 

yes, you can sand the last coat with #1500..use water to act as a lubricant for the

paper, and ensure that the surface is free of any whitish sanding residue.

 

Depending on how rough the red coat is, you could sand with #1500, but

you will remove some of the high gloss, so you can simply over spray that with a clear coat

(2-3 coats recommended) and sand lightly in between coats.

 

Generally urethanes have a high gloss, so buffing is optional..but you must

allow several days for the urethane to cure to avoid "dragging" during buffing, which

could occur if the coating is not completely cured.

Commercial urethane factory finishes use a hardner in the clear coats, but this

has to be added at the time of spraying with a air gun. I don't think that the

spray can finishes have this built in, so more time is required for curing (hardening).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found a can of the paint, doesnt say what it is just the make of it which is plasti-kote.

 

The laquer is the same make so will be compatable.

 

So just to clear up

 

Spray last coat and then rub of any inperfections with 1500 grir (Wet)

 

Wipe off all residues

 

Spray with laquer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found a can of the paint' date=' [b']doesnt say what it is [/b]just the make of it which is plasti-kote.

The laquer is the same make so will be compatable.

Spray last coat and then rub of any inperfections with 1500 grir (Wet)

Wipe off all residues

Spray with laquer.

 

I checked into their website and they seem to make all sorts of paints primarily for

industrial and automotive. Their classic lacquer would (hopefully) be the one that

you are using as it is available in solid colours and clear coat. Just make sure that

both cans say classic lacquer on it..otherwise you may have an "interesting" effect.

 

I don't think that their lacquers are nitro-cellulose based because of VOC restrictions

these days,(probably synthetic) as they mention, non fading.

F*nder used to use automotive lacquers in the early

50s, (Dupont Paints, I believe), so the idea is not new to solid bodies.

 

Your plan sounds right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I checked into their website and they seem to make all sorts of paints primarily for

industrial and automotive. Their classic lacquer would (hopefully) be the one that

you are using as it is available in solid colours and clear coat. Just make sure that

both cans say classic lacquer on it..otherwise you may have an "interesting" effect.

 

I don't think that their lacquers are nitro-cellulose based because of VOC restrictions

these days' date='(probably synthetic) as they mention, non fading.

F*nder used to use automotive lacquers in the early

50s, (Dupont Paints, I believe), so the idea is not new to solid bodies.

 

Your plan sounds right. [/quote']

 

I recently read that Fender started using automotive (synthetic) lacquers around 1958, due to its UV resistance... At the time, it was pretty new to the automotive industry as well...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...