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New Member, SG 310 or 400?


Tesla_HV

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Hi all, I am a new member here and have a question regarding the Epiphone SG electric guitar. A co-worker is selling one for his son. All that I know about it is that it is black and he wants $50 for it. Chances are, at that price, that it is a 310 rather than a 400. First, is a 310 worth $50 used? Second, how good is a 310 as a beginner's guitar. I am buying this for my 11-year-old son. Third, are there upgrades to the 310 to make it better?

Thanks

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Welcome to the forum ! I agree, jump on it for that price, it is a good beginner to intermediate guitar. There are many things to do regarding upgrades but as long as the guitar is functional and everything works, I wouldn't even consider upgrading it for your 11 yr. old until you see that he keeps playing !

 

Good luck !

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Guys' date='

Do we know that it's not an SG Special? I'd still think $50 is an OK price used, if it's in decent shape,[/quote']

 

It could very well be a Special. I'm sort of taking a bit of a chance here in buying it without knowing the model but I figured that at $50, I should at least be able to get my money back out of it. Who knows, I might get lucky. I've got an inquiry going through the dad so perhaps I'll know something in a day or so. In the mean time, am I correct in the following?:

Special: one volume, one tone, bolt on neck

310: two volumes, two tones, bolt on neck

400: two volumes, two tones, set neck.

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Eleven years old? How big are his hands? If they are still small, you might want to go with a 3/4 sized guitar, like the Ibanez Mikro. It's a bit over $100, but at least it would be new, and easier to play.

 

421329jpg.jpg

 

This is a short scale guitar (22.5"), which would be easier on the fingers. Dean also makes two 3/4 scale guitars.

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Eleven years old? How big are his hands? If they are still small' date=' you might want to go with a 3/4 sized guitar, like the Ibanez Mikro. It's a bit over $100, but at least it would be new, and easier to play.

 

[img']http://images.guitarcenter.com/products/optionlarge/Ibanez/421329jpg.jpg[/img]

 

This is a short scale guitar (22.5"), which would be easier on the fingers. Dean also makes two 3/4 scale guitars.

I disagree.

Buy something for him to grow into.

Not grow out of.

11 is plenty old enough for a regular sized guitar.

Why buy something new that he will stop playing shortly?

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I agree with Brad. I teach an after school guitar club for 9 and 10 year olds in a couple of elementary school. Most kids that age can handle a full sized guitar no problem, so an 11 year old shouldn't have any problem with a full sized guitar. And it would be a guitar he could use for years to come.

 

I always have a few kids every year come in with the 3/4 sized First Act guitars. I know the Ibanez is better that the First Acts, but these guitars just look small for some of these kids. Not to mention that many of them can't be tuned.

 

I am also giving lessons to an 11 year old. He bought a Squire Strat, the $100 one, from a friend for $10. Who knows, you may be getting a real deal.

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Hey, 22.5" is longer scale than John Lennon's beloved Rickenbacker. One doesn't have to outgrow it just because it is short scale. I have two Byrdlands, a Takamine Takamini, and a Stratocaster Jr., all short scale. They are just easier to play. You have put 11's on them and it feels like 10's.

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Tesla,

You were right about the diff. between Special/310/400. Just one more thing, though, for whatever it may mean to you: both the 310 and 400 are mahogany (thru & thru, methinks); Special is, what, alder? basswood? Something that ain't mahogany, at any rate.

Just thought you should know in case you already didn't.

Oops! Couple hours later: just looked this stuff up. I'm a big dummy doodoohead. Mahogany. All of you kindly ignore the above. Next time I'll look before leaping.

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For a $50 guitar, and a kid who's never played before, I don't think you can really justify buying new pickups, or replacing the jack or switch.

 

This is an eleven-year-old, who's going to (assuming he sticks with it) want a new guitar every three weeks.

 

Besides, I don't think an eleven-year-old is even going to know the difference between different pickups.

 

As far as wood is concerned, most guitars you buy for $50 are made of plywood or particle board.

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The 310 is a decent beginers guitar' date=' but i would sugest changing the pickups to something nicer. Probly go to Guitarfetish.com and find some nice humbuckers that your son likes.[/quote']

 

I wouldn't know where to begin...

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Well, first let him play the guitar. Encourage him to play alot. If he sticks with it, and gets good at it take him to a guitar store to try guitars. If he likes one thats out of range (thats how i was lol) find out the pickups on the guitar. and switch them out to the 310. But i guess, it depends if hes serious about playing. If there is eny more questions feal free to ask.

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Get whichever one he likes, and you can afford, at the present time.

His tastes will change, I can almost guarantee it....what with

peer pressure, new guitar hero's (and what they're playing), etc. So, if he's ok

with the 310, go for it. IF he keeps playing, he'll change or ADD to it, anyway...maybe,

many times over.

 

Just my 2-cents worth.

 

CB

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I would say ignore the pickups part. A beginner isn't going to notice it anyway. I'd say look at a decent amp over pickups. Pickups are way over rated, and amps are way under rated. Great pickups and a bad amp will sound like garbage, but a great amp will make 'almost' anything sound good (the actuall player doesn't count on this). Just get him the guitar ($50 is a steal, btw), and a decent amp, and he'll be good for a while, until he's decided he's going to really take guitar seriously and starts to be getting good. Just encourage practice and wait.

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For $50, if it is in decent shape, it's a good buy.

 

Forget about upgrading it for now and take it to a good guitar tech to set the action and intonation. Tell the tech it is for your son, and you want it to be easy for him to play.

 

Then the best thing you can do after that is to get a good guitar teacher. The most important thing for a first guitar teacher is one who will make learning fun for your child. Music has to be fun (that's why they call it playing music). If it's enjoyable, you son will stick with it and reap the rewards that knowing how to play music will give him. (I can't say fun enough here)

 

Then, later when he wants to either upgrade or trade-up, you will know when it is right.

 

Insights and incites by Notes

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The seller is also including a 50-watt Fender guitar amplifier for $50. I have no idea' date=' is this a good amp or a good price?[/quote']

 

What are you waitin' for - grab it now ! Again, forget the up grades at least until you see if he likes it /sticks with it/learns guitar, not necessarily in that order !

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