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byrdland/country deluxe = single cut 335?


eor

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well, byrd has a spruce top and smaller scale, the country has the maple/birch thing and the master v/t, and both have ebony boards but other wise, more or less? kinda? similar size, right?

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oh yeah... that. :) i was staring at photos for a while and i was trying to picture two bottom halves of a byrd becoming a 335, which brought me here. they are all thinlines, too!

 

i keep trying to figure out which i might prefer to have next, if that ever happens, but i can't narrow it down.

 

byrdland: solid spruce top! i'm both curious and scared of the 23.5 scale; i do a lot of stretchy stuff. same narrower nut like the lps.

 

country deluxe: quirky! never used master vol/tone, the maple/birch combo, or a bigsby. don't i think i would use the much bigsby much, but i am very curious about the other two. wider nut. if i could get a wine red one i'd die, after swapping everything back to chrome.

 

or maybe i should just hold out for a big box...

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yes, aside from their differences, they are remarkably similar. :)

 

but seriously, are the dimensions of the guitars are the same? i haven't seen exact measurements anywhere, and i want to get a feel for how big they are. single cut 335 sound about right? or maybe i should have said casino. i meant the shape! the size!

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If you have exceptionally large hands or very long fingers you might have a problem. Medium hands take about 10 minutes to figure out how much easier it is to get around the neck when you can comfortably and easily streach 5 frets, but there are only a few chords (relatively) that really require a huge stretch. Mostly jazz chords, and there are well known substitutes for them, so that's more a mind issue than anything else. Even going back up to a 25 1/2" strat neck isn't very difficult unless you make it so, IMHO. Byrdland is a 17" lower bout, so its pretty wide, a full inch of most ES-335's. Slightly thicker than an ES-335, but not as thick as a Broadway - maybe half the typical dreadnaught acoustic. It is a joy to play, and has a slightly different natural tone because of the short scale that can be heard clean and dirty. Equally at home in rock, blues and jazz. The pickups are similar in tone to the 490/498. I think sweeter than PAF, definitely brighter than most 57 Classics I've heard, with really good wood coming through, especially on the neck pickup. Really, really, really likes Fender tube cleans but no twang at all; respectable with Vox but its not a Gretsch so no real Harrison tones; maybe not the guitar you think of when Marshalls come to mind, but its decent. I tend to keep neck only or blend selected. Every time I pick it up, I wonder why it took so long to get back to it. Someone else will have to handle the CG, I've never seen one up close and personal.

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The Country Deluxe (CG is one again a Gretsch designation) has similarities and differences to all the other guitars mentioned. Like the Byrdland, it has a 17" lower bout, like the 335 it has a center block (which Chet Atkins always wanted but Gretsch wouldn't make for him); but it also has a 25.5" scale, which makes it a different animal altogether. Scale length doesn't just affect the reach of your fingers; it also has a major impact on tone due to the difference in string tension. The CD also has Gretsch-style controls, with individual pickup volumes, master volume and master tone. There are both pros and cons to this, but it does make the CD different from the others being compared. It also has a wider fingerboard. which lends itself to Chet-style fingerpicking.

 

The true "single cutaway 335" would be an ES-135 or ES-137 --- which I believe Epiphone did briefly produce a version of some years back.

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all this discussion and i am still no closer to deciding which i like more. heh.

 

a 23.5 scale would be like a capo at the 2nd fret or so, right? i like to tune down, so i worry about my tension at that scale length. and spruce top, maple back/sides... kinda like an acoustic. intresting, man. i don't do twang (or jazz) for that matter, so i'm not bother by its inherent non-twanginess.

 

and the chet is basically like playing an acoustic, in terms of nut and scale. which doesn't really bug me that much, as i have a similar acoustic, but it isn't really what i want from an electric. plus, i never realized that it wasn't a full hollow. not that the cd isn't different from a sheraton, but i think the byrd would be "more different".

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