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rhythm select setting on toggle switch


freakus

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Hi,

My rhythm select setting on toggle switch isn't working, only some times. I replaced the switch, but still the same issue, no problem on the treble setting, if I give it a tap on the back it does work. Any one have any ideas to what the issue is? Could this be a humbucker issue. I'm a newbie, it's a Epi Les Paul Gibson, (old name for a standard?) cica Late nineties.

Thanking you in advance,

Freakus

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Probably a loose wire' date=' bad solder connection, etc.[/quote']

 

Ron, it's more that the switch contacts are not making a good connection

on those asian 3-ways. You can fiddle with them, spray (etc),but eventually

the 3 way will need to be replaced. I had to do it on my Epi LP custom...it

got very annoying intermittently..and you had to flip the toggle many times

back and forth and it would start working again.

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Well you've already replaced the switch... so I'd do as mentioned and make sure the connections at the volume pot where the pickup is connected are good. Sometimes all it needs is to be re-heated with the soldering iron and a smidgen of fresh solder added.

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Ron' date=' it's more that the switch contacts are not making a good connection

on those asian 3-ways. You can fiddle with them, spray (etc),but eventually

the 3 way will need to be replaced. I had to do it on my Epi LP custom...it

got very annoying intermittently..and you had to flip the toggle many times

back and forth and it would start working again.[/quote']

 

Carv, you probably noticed by now that the guy already replaced the switch

but I did want to mention that an "asian 3-way" sounds like fun.:D

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Carv' date=' you probably noticed by now that the guy already replaced the switch

but I did want to mention that an "asian 3-way" sounds like fun.8-[ [/quote']

 

Yes, those asian 3-ways can be very entertaining. =P~

 

But seriously, even if he has replaced the switch (with a non-switchcraft),

it could be the solder joints, or even the spring tension on the new switch, or

possibly the wires are not soldered and insulated at the switch terminals.

But other knowlegeable forum posters have already replied to his post.

 

I would be more inclined that it's those dam* Gremlins...you just can't

feed them after midnight. If the guitar starts playing on it's own..then

my suspicion may be confirmed.

 

I always like to tin the wire strands with some solder, then solder it to the terminals.

Avoids those annoying cold solder joints that can be intermittent.

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I would be more inclined that it's those dam* Gremlins..

 

Twue. I "tap" tested my new pickups immediately after installing them but before

restringing. Then new strings, bridge adjustment, truss rod, etc. Plugged it in -

nothing. Jiggled wires and it would work/not work as I jiggled. Figgered no big deal,

pulled the pots and switch out the F hole, damn if it didn't work fine no matter what

I jiggled. Put it all back together again and it worked fine. I love a mystery.There's

obviously an iffy connection somewhere - I'll install all new parts if and when it fails

again.

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Twue. I "tap" tested my new pickups immediately after installing them but before

restringing. Then new strings' date=' bridge adjustment, truss rod, etc. Plugged it in -

nothing. Jiggled wires and it would work/not work as I jiggled. Figgered no big deal,

pulled the pots and switch out the F hole, damn if it didn't work fine no matter what

I jiggled. Put it all back together again and it worked fine. I love a mystery.There's

obviously an iffy connection somewhere - I'll install all new parts if and when it fails

again.[/quote']

 

I've had that happen to me too, on occasion. But usually I was into more complicated wiring with electronic

do-dads (electronic sustainer/t bridge/battery powered preamp added to the mix to complicate things. By the time I got the//<pick one> <rats nest> <dog's breakfast> of wiring all straightened out inside the guitar(s), the twisted short that was causing the trouble, got move around and everything cleared up.

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Twue. I "tap" tested my new pickups immediately after installing them but before

restringing. Then new strings' date=' bridge adjustment, truss rod, etc. Plugged it in -

nothing. Jiggled wires and it would work/not work as I jiggled. Figgered no big deal,

pulled the pots and switch out the F hole, damn if it didn't work fine no matter what

I jiggled. Put it all back together again and it worked fine. I love a mystery.There's

obviously an iffy connection somewhere - I'll install all new parts if and when it fails

again.[/quote']

 

Been there, done that, got the t-shirt. Same thing happened to me a couple of times when doing my Dot. My Sherry was a piece of cake, 1 time only. but them I spent hours on my Dot first.

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Well you've already replaced the switch... so I'd do as mentioned and make sure the connections at the volume pot where the pickup is connected are good. Sometimes all it needs is to be re-heated with the soldering iron and a smidgen of fresh solder added.

 

"pot"?? are those the volume knob area??

Thx

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Probably a loose wire' date=' b d solder connection, etc.[/quote']

 

It appears the general consenus if that it fits somewhere under the above area, if I hear you all correctly?

Would you know the basic layout for these guitars? If I replaced the pickups would that help? Just one, which is for the rhythum?, if I have this correct. When it "cuts in" the volume knobs tone works fine.

Thanks everyone, keep em coming........as a newbie I want to get going and have no more distractions.well...they're fun too, when I keep learning.

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Yes' date=' those asian 3-ways can be very entertaining. :)

 

But seriously, even if he has replaced the switch (with a non-switchcraft),

it could be the solder joints, or even the spring tension on the new switch, or

possibly the wires are not soldered and insulated at the switch terminals.

But other knowlegeable forum posters have already replied to his post.

 

I would be more inclined that it's those dam* Gremlins...you just can't

feed them after midnight. If the guitar starts playing on it's own..then

my suspicion may be confirmed.

 

I always like to tin the wire strands with some solder, then solder it to the terminals.

Avoids those annoying cold solder joints that can be intermittent.

 

[/quote']

 

What's a "non-switchcraft"?

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Pot = potentiometer, it is a variable resistor. The knobs on the front of the guitar help you control them. (Volume knob, Tone Knob)

 

Non-Switchcraft = Switchcraft in a brand name of electronics. Non would be a differnt compnay. Switchcraft are very good quality, some of the Asian (non-Switchcraft) electronics fall short.

 

A wiring diagram for the guitar you have is below. Notice where the wires for the rhythm pickup (neck) and selector switch connect to the neck volume potentiometer. When you take the back cover off your guitar, this is how the pots will look.

 

2h_2v_2t_3w.jpg

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If I replaced the pickups would that help?

 

Extremely doubtful that the pickup is the culprit.

 

Try this: With the guitar plugged into the amp (at a low volume), the 3-way

selector on "rhythm" and the wiring access panels open, jiggle and tug lightly

one wire at a time to see if you can get the output to cut in/out. You may be

able to locate the bad connection in this manner.

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Pot = potentiometer' date=' it is a variable resistor. The knobs on the front of the guitar help you control them. (Volume knob, Tone Knob)

 

Non-Switchcraft = Switchcraft in a brand name of electronics. Non would be a differnt compnay. Switchcraft are very good quality, some of the Asian (non-Switchcraft) electronics fall short.

 

A wiring diagram for the guitar you have is below. Notice where the wires for the rhythm pickup (neck) and selector switch connect to the [b']neck volume [/b]potentiometer. When you take the back cover off your guitar, this is how the pots will look.

 

AWESOME!

 

Would I remove all the soder from the suggested "neck volume pot"and resoder it back on? I'm assuming that it would most likely be the "green wire connection" from the pickups to the pot? Not the "new switch connection". (not to rule that out). Any dangers of resodering everything I can see?

Here's maybe more info that I should have posted before.

It is better "more stable" with the new switch. Last week for the first day when I bought it, it cut out 20 x on the first day. Fixed it at the local shop by noon Sat. I didn't even know it was #@$* up until Monday. Wednesday, I was convinced there was a problem.

Oh, does anyone know if I'm correct with my guessing a "Epi Les Paul Gibson" is the same as a "Epi Les Paul Standard" just an earlier model?

Thanks.

All suggestions for approach are welcome, ie. type of soder, replacement parts, etc.

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Extremely doubtful that the pickup is the culprit.

 

Try this: With the guitar plugged into the amp (at a low volume)' date=' the 3-way

selector on "rhythm" and the wiring access panels open, jiggle and tug lightly

one wire at a time to see if you can get the output to cut in/out. You may be

able to locate the bad connection in this manner.[/quote']

 

I like that idea!

Is there anything that I absolutely should not touch in there?... for fear of death?

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AWESOME!

 

Would I remove all the soder from the suggested "neck volume pot"and resoder it back on?

 

CARV SEZ: Not really necessary. Just add some 63/37 electronic solder (the thin wire solder) and

reheat the connection at each tap while adding a bit of solder.

 

I'm assuming that it would most likely be the "green wire connection" from the pickups to the pot?

 

CARV: Yes' date=' it's usually the green wire.

 

Not the "new switch connection". (not to rule that out). Any dangers of resodering everything I can see?

 

CARV: No not really, just don't overheat the wires so much that the insulation melts back.

 

Here's maybe more info that I should have posted before.

It is better "more stable" with the new switch. Last week for the first day when I bought it, it cut out 20 x on the first day. Fixed it at the local shop by noon Sat. I didn't even know it was #@$* up until Monday. Wednesday, I was convinced there was a problem.

 

CARV: Ok, if it's not the 3 way, then one of the volume pots is going intermittent on you. Dirt/dust can do

that when it gets inside the opening at the front of the pot where the 3 taps come out. (I seal all mine

with some white surgical tape). You need to get some contact spray (contact lubricant) and spray the

volume pot through that opening. Just blast it and operate the volume a few times to get the wiper

(center tap) to clean the resistive element (which looks like a horseshoe) inside.

 

Oh, does anyone know if I'm correct with my guessing a "Epi Les Paul Gibson" is the same as a "Epi Les Paul Standard" just an earlier model?

 

CARV: More than likely, unless it says "Custom" on the TRC.

 

All suggestions for approach are welcome, ie. type of soder, replacement parts, etc.[/quote']

 

If spraying the pots doesn't help and you have check all the solder joints thoroughly, replace the

pot (whichever one is cutting out) or even all of them, if you have the time with CTS pots. Alpha

also make a reasonable quality pot, available from numerous online sources.

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It is better "more stable" with the new switch. Last week for the first day when I bought it' date=' it cut out 20 x on the first day. Fixed it at the local shop by noon Sat. I didn't even know it was #@$* up until Monday. Wednesday, I was convinced there was a problem.

[/quote']

 

Did you just buy this from a guitar shop? If you did and they worked on it and didn't get it fixed right, your best bet would be to take it back to them and let them fix it.

 

It can be frustrating working on stuff if you are unsure of what you are doing. A few years ago I built a couple of guitar amps. I had some electronics background, but I was by no means an electronic whiz. I got them together, but they didn't work right. I ended up sending them off to be fixed cause I couldn't figure it out. There were only a couple of minor problems, but I couldn't figure them out. I just say that to say that sometimes it can be frustrating. I knew when I was in over my head, and I had to cry "Uncle." You might want to take it in and have them fix it until you are a little more experienced.

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Oh' date=' does anyone know if I'm correct with my guessing a "Epi Les Paul Gibson" is the same as a "Epi Les Paul Standard" just an earlier model?[/quote']

 

Are you saying "Gibson" because that is the name printed on the truss rod cover (under the strings just above the nut on the headstock)? Without photos none of us could say for sure what model you have. Could be a standard, custom, etc.... Post a photo if you can.

 

Welcome to the EPI forum freakus! Good, knowledgeable players here to help you out.

 

Hit every BLUE NOTE baaaby..., I'm going to play on:-"

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If spraying the pots doesn't help and you have check all the solder joints thoroughly' date=' replace the

pot (whichever one is cutting out) or even all of them, if you have the time with CTS pots. Alpha

also make a reasonable quality pot, available from numerous online sources.

[/quote']

Thank-you very much, everyone really...

What would one use for spray?

 

Ahhh! Contact spray (as per earlier post). Thanks!

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Are you saying "Gibson" because that is the name printed on the truss rod cover (under the strings just above the nut on the headstock)? Without photos none of us could say for sure what model you have. Could be a standard' date=' custom, etc.... Post a photo if you can.

 

[b']Welcome to the EPI forum freakus![/b] Good, knowledgeable players here to help you out.

 

Hit every BLUE NOTE baaaby..., I'm going to play on:-"

 

Thanks! It's a wonderful place to be!

Yes, that is correct. The name says Gibson. Here's the pics.

IMG_4763.jpg

IMG_4764.jpg

IMG_4765.jpg

IMG_4766.jpg

IMG_4767.jpg

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Did you just buy this from a guitar shop? If you did and they worked on it and didn't get it fixed right' date=' your best bet would be to take it back to them and let them fix it.

 

It can be frustrating working on stuff if you are unsure of what you are doing. A few years ago I built a couple of guitar amps. I had some electronics background, but I was by no means an electronic whiz. I got them together, but they didn't work right. I ended up sending them off to be fixed cause I couldn't figure it out. There were only a couple of minor problems, but I couldn't figure them out. I just say that to say that sometimes it can be frustrating. I knew when I was in over my head, and I had to cry "Uncle." You might want to take it in and have them fix it until you are a little more experienced. [/quote']

 

Nope, bought it used online. Heard switches were an issue and took my chances. They replaced the switch, and that was it. They told me if it wasn't the switch, I'd be waiting 4 weeks, I only owned it for 5 hours at the time, and couldn't part with it. BUT, the gremlins have been working for me, no issues with it since joining this forum!

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Oh' date=' does anyone know if I'm correct with my guessing a "Epi Les Paul Gibson" is the same as a "Epi Les Paul Standard" just an earlier model?[/quote']

Looks like an "Epi Les Paul Standard" Plus with cherryburst finish. The "Gibson" TRC could be one that EPI put on -- they have used several types/logos over the years -- or an add-on by a prior owner. In and of itself the TRC does not change the name designation from "Standard." Real nice looking lefty guitar, congratulations.

 

Hit every BLUE NOTE baaaby..., I'm going to play on:-"

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