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Plek


bluelake07

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Some of the new Gibsons feature the Plek process' date=' a computer-controlled method of fret dressing. Have any of you played/purchased a guitar that has had this done? Would you pay to have this performed on a high-end Epiphone? [/quote']

 

I heard it's expensive, so I would only consider it on high end. My Strat is the only one I have that comes close to that category and I don't know if even it is worthy of having the process done on it.

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I've paid for it, on five guitars. You cannot imagine the difference. It is moderately expensive. The tech can save your settings and reproduce the same neck on any guitar you want. The largest difference I've seen was on a Dot Studio. Neck went from OK to ohmigodIdiedandwenttoheaven. The worse the neck to start with, the more benefit to the guitar from plek. It doesn't care what you start with, you will end with perfection. Every time.

 

Of course, nobody reading this understands, but you all THINK you can. OK, remember how much you THOUGHT you knew about sex before you had sex the first time? Well, until you've had a guitar plekked, that's how much you know about this.

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I find it hard to believe that plek will do a dramatically better job over a good luthier.

I'm sure it's a great idea for the manufacturing process, however.

But 150.00 for level crown and polish, while it isn't steep, is probably more than most people would have to pay unless thier frets were

really a mess.

 

and I've had sex, thanks.

My point being, I've played carvins and taylors, and custom instruments of very high quality.

I find it very very hard to believe that luthiers and manufacturers have been all that far off over the years.

 

I think this is a good thing. I like new technology in guitars. I hope it's something that epi can incorporate as well.

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I'd like to play one that is Pleked. I think that a good luthier should be able to do as good a job using the proper tools and procedures, after all, the machine's program was written to perform the steps that were previously done manually. The benefit is that the machine does it the same every time. PLEK doesn't have bad days, phone calls, constipation, or an attitude. Unless it has a circuit board failure. Then it might just grind right through to the back of the neck...Grin.

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Oh ye of little faith. I repeat. It is perfect. Every time, in every way. There is no "perfect, except for this tiny little nick in the 4th fret that you'll never even feel". Perfect. No fret end filed to a different angle. Every time. No burrs in the fingerboard where the file slipped. Perfect. Every time.

 

I understand your reluctance to believe. I didn't either, until I tried it. But, don't take my word for it. Go find one for yourself. Besides, if you aren't willing to try it, all you are doing is making hot air. Ask your local tech where you can try one. He'll know, won't even need to call around.

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Oh ye of little faith. I repeat. It is perfect. Every time' date=' in every way. There is no "perfect, except for this tiny little nick in the 4th fret that you'll never even feel". Perfect. No fret end filed to a different angle. Every time. No burrs in the fingerboard where the file slipped. Perfect. Every time.

 

I understand your reluctance to believe. I didn't either, until I tried it. But, don't take my word for it. Go find one for yourself. Besides, if you aren't willing to try it, all you are doing is making hot air. Ask your local tech where you can try one. He'll know, won't even need to call around. [/quote']

 

I like new technology and this certainly holds a lot of merit. However, when they comment on the degree of tolerance, those are some pretty tight numbers. My thought is that after some time of playing, fret wear does eliminate some of the work you paid to have the Plex process done.

 

The other thing that comes to mind, if everything else isn't perfect and doesn't stay perfect (truss rod, saddle position...) how much of a positive effect can the plek process have?

 

Again, I am finding it interesting, but...

 

BTW, I don't trust luthiers, so I'm open to new technology

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In this small Texas town there are no Plek machines (thanks for the link to the video, ef_in_fla), so it's academic. I was reading Gibson's description of it and got the impression that the Plek treatment is set up for 0.010 strings, which is too light for my taste. Guess this is something to file in the back drawer.

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Plek is a process. The tech will ask (or should!) all kinds of questions about strings, action, preferences - all that - and the machine is set to make the neck like that. Once again, if you haven't tried it, you don't know what you are talking about, and frankly, some of the things I've seen come out of people's mouths and fingers (this is not the first forum where the subject has arisen) is just foolish. A lot of times, its people just trying to find negatives about something new. If you research the topic, you will find tons of data - and almost all of it says the exact same things I've been saying. See, that's how I know who pays attention. This has been done to thousands of guitars. The process has been around long enough for even ultra-conservative mainstream manufacturers to use it, and they were not "first adopters". There is almost no informed opinion anywhere in the industry that thinks it can't, or won't, work. All the ideas you can think up to bad mouth the process have already been pounded into submission. There have been magazine articles, reviews, the whole deal -- and for years and years now. I've done the homework.

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BTW' date=' I don't trust luthiers, so I'm open to new technology[/quote']

 

I know what you mean. I'd sort of like to try a pro setup but I can envision paying a hefty bill and getting back a guitar that isn't much better (or maybe worse) than what I turned over.

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Plek is a process. The tech will ask (or should!) all kinds of questions about strings' date=' action, preferences - all that - and the machine is set to make the neck like that. Once again, if you haven't tried it, you don't know what you are talking about, and frankly, some of the things I've seen come out of people's mouths and fingers (this is not the first forum where the subject has arisen) is just foolish. A lot of times, its people just trying to find negatives about something new. If you research the topic, you will find tons of data - and almost all of it says the exact same things I've been saying. See, that's how I know who pays attention. This has been done to thousands of guitars. The process has been around long enough for even ultra-conservative mainstream manufacturers to use it, and they were not "first adopters". There is almost no informed opinion anywhere in the industry that thinks it can't, or won't, work. All the ideas you can think up to bad mouth the process have already been pounded into submission. There have been magazine articles, reviews, the whole deal -- and for years and years now. I've done the homework.

[/quote']

 

Take a chill pill bro. No one said it wouldn't work. It just seems like alot for the average person to have to go through for a fret level and a set up. It looks like a great concept, but your not going to find alot of people on an Epiphone forum who are willing to spend $200 for a set up. Learn how to take a joke, man.

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Snookelputz:

 

You're starting to sound like Copernicus trying to convince people the planets revolve around the sun, not the earth. Of course he ended up being correct. I never had a problem with my frets, my action is a little high on all my guitars but I don't really think about it. I don't mind spending a few bucks to make my guitar better. But really? How can this make that much of a difference?

 

Seems like if it ain't broke don't fix it.

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Snookelputz:

 

You're starting to sound like Copernicus trying to convince people the planets revolve around the sun' date=' not the earth. Of course he ended up being correct. I never had a problem with my frets, my action is a little high on all my guitars but I don't really think about it. I don't mind spending a few bucks to make my guitar better. But really? How can this make that much of a difference? Seems like if it ain't broke don't fix it.[/quote']

 

I wonder if there's such a thing as Plek capacitors?:)

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Take a chill pill bro. No one said it wouldn't work. It just seems like alot for the average person to have to go through for a fret level and a set up. It looks like a great concept' date=' but your not going to find alot of people on an Epiphone forum who are willing to spend $200 for a set up. Learn how to take a joke, man.[/quote']

+1

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Having done a couple of home fret dressings in my workshop, I am very convinced that fret leveling is the single best thing that you can do for the playability of your guitar. I watched the video and I don't see a downside, other than the cost. The more you play a guitar, especially if you are a heavy handed player like I am, fret wear will accumulate. I have a 29 year old Strat that I bought new and upon close inspection, it has slight oval wear areas in certain places on a few frets. Since it has never had any fret work done, it could be restored to better than new condition by one of these machines. OF course, it still plays well so I probably won't touch it until it doesn't.

 

I like the idea of minimum material removal. It's easy to remove too much when you do a manual fret dressing. I just did one on my new goldtop and I am happy with the results (see the topic "Goldie gets a fret dressing" for pictures). I probably didn't remove enough when I did it. It still isn't as low as the first one I did on the flametop, but now that I am comfortable with the procedure, I can do it a second time and get it right. PLEK would do it right the first time.

 

Since Gibson has installed a PLEK and is using it on some new guitars, I would consider that to be a great endorsement. Old school guitar manufacturers have been sold on the idea and they are the people that know the difference. Their luthiers can take a quick look at a guitar and see more in one examination than we will ever discern. I hope that they didn't get rid of the talent after going with PLEK. That kind of talent takes a lot of experience to develop.

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So according to you, snookelputz, if I brought a Sears POS guitar to be plek'd, it would play so well afterwards that I would throw my Epis out the window?

 

Having done a couple of home fret dressings in my workshop' date=' I am very convinced that fret leveling is the single best thing that you can do for the playability of your guitar. I watched the video and I don't see a downside, other than the cost. The more you play a guitar, especially if you are a heavy handed player like I am, fret wear will accumulate. I have a 29 year old Strat that I bought new and upon close inspection, it has slight oval wear areas in certain places on a few frets. Since it has never had any fret work done, it could be restored to better than new condition by one of these machines. OF course, it still plays well so I probably won't touch it until it doesn't.

 

I like the idea of minimum material removal. It's easy to remove too much when you do a manual fret dressing. I just did one on my new goldtop and I am happy with the results (see the topic "Goldie gets a fret dressing" for pictures). I probably didn't remove enough when I did it. It still isn't as low as the first one I did on the flametop, but now that I am comfortable with the procedure, I can do it a second time and get it right. PLEK would do it right the first time.

 

Since Gibson has installed a PLEK and is using it on some new guitars, I would consider that to be a great endorsement. Old school guitar manufacturers have been sold on the idea and they are the people that know the difference. Their luthiers can take a quick look at a guitar and see more in one examination than we will ever discern. I hope that they didn't get rid of the talent after going with PLEK. That kind of talent takes a lot of experience to develop.

[/quote']

 

Yeah, I do find it interesting that Gibson Plek'd the new 2008 LP Standard and the Traditional, that has all the features of the old LPs, is also Plek'd. That kinda says something...

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So according to you' date=' snookelputz, if I brought a Sears POS guitar to be plek'd, it would play so well afterwards that I would throw my Epis out the window?

 

 

 

Yeah, I do find it interesting that Gibson Plek'd the new 2008 LP Standard and the Traditional, that has all the features of the old LPs, is also Plek'd. That kinda says something...[/quote']

 

Why does somebody always try to put words in my mouth? I said the PROCESS will make the neck perfect. That means, all frets leveled at the desired height, crowned, set, and trimmed; nut adjusted for height and string width, truss rod adjusted, bridge height adjusted, and intonation set; all to your specifications. I said the greatest improvement will be on a cheap guitar. I said the greatest thing is that the process is repeatable, with the same guitar or a different guitar. I said it would make the neck feel the same, every time, as perfect as your specifications. I said nothing about turning a POS into the guitar of your dreams. And why should I be the one to chill? I'm the one who actually has some experience here. I'm simply trying to pass on some information, and some of you are biting my head off. But its all right, know why? Because some of you will try it, and discover the truth for yourselves - and others will continue to carp about something they have no knowledge about whatsoever.

 

So, here's my offer to you -- go check it out. Then come back and talk. I won't say another word on the subject until any one of you comes back with firsthand knowledge.; provided you stop trying to take the mickey to me. If the moderators leave this thread, I'll still be here, happily playing several different guitars that all have the same feel to the neck. Thank you. Thank you, very much.

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Why does somebody always try to put words in my mouth? I said the PROCESS will make the neck perfect. That means' date=' all frets leveled at the desired height, crowned, set, and trimmed; nut adjusted for height and string width, truss rod adjusted, bridge height adjusted, and intonation set; all to your specifications. I said the greatest improvement will be on a cheap guitar. I said the greatest thing is that the process is repeatable, with the same guitar or a different guitar. I said it would make the neck feel the same, every time, as perfect as your specifications. I said nothing about turning a POS into the guitar of your dreams. And why should I be the one to chill? I'm the one who actually has some experience here. I'm simply trying to pass on some information, and some of you are biting my head off. But its all right, know why? Because some of you will try it, and discover the truth for yourselves - and others will continue to carp about something they have no knowledge about whatsoever.

 

So, here's my offer to you -- go check it out. Then come back and talk. I won't say another word on the subject until any one of you comes back with firsthand knowledge.; provided you stop trying to take the mickey to me. If the moderators leave this thread, I'll still be here, happily playing several different guitars that all have the same feel to the neck. Thank you. Thank you, very much.[/quote']

 

Ok. Good. With that said, please take the Chill Pill that I prescibed to you. You'll feel much better in the morning.

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Ok. Good. With that said' date=' please take the Chill Pill that I prescibed to you. You'll feel much better in the morning.[/quote']

 

Yeah, man, it's late. I feel like the Dr.'s avatar looks. Let's all sleep on this.

 

And BTW, I wasn't putting words in your mouth or attacking you, I was asking a question so you could clarify your point. I don't attack people on here, I give you respect, and you give me respect. Other than 13yguitarman, but he had it coming, lol.

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