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Buzzing again


Bill V

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I'll skip the formalities and get right down to the meat of the issue.

 

G-400 buzzing on the 5th string between the 12th and 15th maybe the 17th fret. string height at the 12th fret is a little more that 6/64 on the bass side and 4/64 on the treble side. What do you all think? Thanks.

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I'll skip the formalities and get right down to the meat of the issue.

 

G-400 buzzing on the 5th string between the 12th and 15th maybe the 17th fret. string height at the 12th fret is a little more that 6/64 on the bass side and 4/64 on the treble side. What do you all think? Thanks.

 

1. Go with exact specs.

2. Have the saddles been checked?

3. How is the setting on the Stop bar? (Most of the time on Epiphones, they're typically jacked all the way down.)

4. Is the truss rod straight?

5. Standard, or aftermarket nut?

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1. Specs - almost exact - just a hair higher on bass side (won't specify hair type 8-[ )

2. Turned a couple of the saddles around months ago in order to get proper intonation

3. Stop bar is stock - never considered changing the stop bar setting

4. Truss rod fine - have plenty of, but not too much relief

5. Original factory nut - only an issue if buzzing on open string, not the case

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1. Specs - almost exact - just a hair higher on bass side (won't specify hair type 8-[ )

2. Turned a couple of the saddles around months ago in order to get proper intonation

3. Stop bar is stock - never considered changing the stop bar setting

4. Truss rod fine - have plenty of' date= but not too much relief

5. Original factory nut - only an issue if buzzing on open string, not the case[/quote]

 

Hmmm...Other than verifying the stop bar's all the way down, you got me. Those are the basics right there. '

 

Is that guitar still under warranty?

 

EDIT: This is all I can really offer...technically, you're down to either the nut, the bridge and its components, the action, or the truss rod. If you've checked all of those things, and you're satisfied, you might be looking at a replacement nut or bridge (or the components thereof.)

 

Other than that? Maybe a fret dressing.....(I did see Dave's thread, and after he did that he was able to set his action to disgustingly low levels on his Goldtop.)

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The guitar is only six months old so it would likely have to go back to Epiphone (Gibson). When you factor in shipping, it would probably be more cost effective to have a good luthier do a fret leveling, but I'm hoping that won't be necessary.

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1. Specs - almost exact - just a hair higher on bass side (won't specify hair type :P )

 

 

The amplitude of the strings is much higher on bass-side. I think you should be looking for more than a hair(regardless of type and/or colour).

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EDIT: This is all I can really offer...technically' date=' you're down to either the nut, the bridge and its components, the action, or the truss rod. If you've checked all of those things, and you're satisfied, you might be looking at a replacement nut or bridge (or the components thereof.)

 

Other than that? Maybe a fret dressing.....(I did see Dave's thread, and after he did that he was able to set his action to disgustingly low levels on his Goldtop.)[/quote']

 

Typically speaking the low E or low A string could buzz on some frets due to a dip on

the bass side of the neck which is not uncommon in guitars that not have been setup

or worked on yet. This has more to do with the height of the bridge or the curvature

of the neck and possibly a fret that is higher than the others when it was pressed

in.

 

I don't think the nut has as much effect on buzzing after the 3rd fret as the trueness

of the neck, the fret evenness and the bridge height. It's always time consuming to get

everything just right so that the bass strings don't buzz and the string action is as

low as you can get it.

I always start with getting the neck as true as possible. Adjustment of the truss rod

will help, but there could still be a slight dip on the bass side (usually) and if you can't

get it true, you will have to fret dress very carefully with that in mind on the bass side.

 

Dave, just recently posted his method with pictures of how he did it. I do mine almost

the same but with a Stew-Mac radiused fret sanding block and different grades of

Norton papers temporarily stuck to the block. You can also use a flat file, called

a mill or bastard file, (not sure where that terminology came from), and carefully

file the tops of the frets using a metal straight edge and a piece of computer paper

that spans 2-3 frets and long enough so you can pull on the paper from the side

of the neck. Hold down the paper tight with the metal ruler and try to pull it

out, if it doesn't slip out, then the frets are even. Dave uses the magic marker

method, that also works. Every one has their own method and if you do it

right, you can get the frets down to where there is no buzz on particular frets.

 

Of course, after filing/sanding, you need to crown the frets again to prevent

abrasion of your finger tips. That is a subject in itself and the final polishing,

whether it is #0000 steel wool, fine wet.dry sandpapers (#400/#600) or

even a 3M scotchbrite pad.

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As Carverman said, I would suspect high (or low) frets in that area. A quick check is to do this: Press the string down with your left hand and then press down on the string with your right hand just past the next fret, like you are checking relief. There should be equal clearance on the next fret as you do this up and down the area where the buzz occurs. Move up and down the neck one fret at a time until you find a fret with little or no clearance. If you find clearance that is minimal on a fret, take a business card and place the edge over 3 frets at a time and check for a slight rocking. You can find a high fret this way and with a little savvy you can determine if a fret is low.

 

It's not uncommon to find frets that didn't get pressed all the way in during manufacturing. I had several in the 9-13 area on my new goldtop. You can tap these frets down lightly with a small hammer. I prefer to use a heavy screwdriver handle, tapping the frets with the butt of the handle. It doesn't dent the fret and provides enough inertia to seat the fret.

 

A caveat exists here. Once you seat a fret or frets, you may have buzz in new places. Start again with the rocker card and locate the new high or low fret. I always check the frets for proper seating before I start sanding on a dress job.

 

The ultimate fix for your problem may be a fret dressing. It will certainly fix the problem if the neck itself isn't bowed or warped too badly.

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