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Beginner thinking of EPI LP 100


rbc

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Want to keep investment down to around $400.

EPI LP 100 $269

Traynor DG10 AMP $75

Headphones ,cables,books etc.

 

Real question- is the LP 100 a good start guitar and will Traynor sound OK? Or should the amp be a Line 6 Spider 111 or the roland cube 15 X. Just want a decent practice AMP.

 

I live in the Keys and not much here as far as Music stores so this has to be all on-line without me being able to touch or hear. Can't seem to find out how much the LP 100 might weigh. Any ideas?

I also see that I can get EPI LP Classic Quilt Top scratch and dent for $342.

Is that any "better" for a beginner?

 

thanks for any input

I know a lot about boats but nothing about electric guitars,yet!

 

rbc

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Want to keep investment down to around $400.

EPI LP 100 $269

Traynor DG10 AMP $75

Headphones ' date='cables,books etc.

 

Real question- is the LP 100 a good start guitar and will Traynor sound OK? Or should the amp be a Line 6 Spider 111 or the roland cube 15 X. Just want a decent practice AMP.

 

I live in the Keys and not much here as far as Music stores so this has to be all on-line without me being able to touch or hear. Can't seem to find out how much the LP 100 might weigh. Any ideas?

I also see that I can get EPI LP Classic Quilt Top scratch and dent for $342.

Is that any "better" for a beginner?

 

thanks for any input

I know a lot about boats but nothing about electric guitars,yet!

 

rbc[/quote']

 

I kind of liked the LP 100. I thought it was a decent guitar for the price, and I couldn't find any major flaws with it when I tested one out about a month ago. There's also a question of the bolt-on neck which might be great in your situation....(considering it's the Keys, your frets are going to wear out more quickly due to high humidity...but, that's life in the tropics.)

 

As for amps? Look at a Roland Microcube, or a Line 6 Microspider. (Vox also makes a portable practice amp.) Those run about 120 dollars, NEW. The great thing about those amps? They run on batteries, so if you're hanging with your friends on the boat or on the beach, you can play right along with 'em on your electric (even if they're all acoustic)...no AC power required. (And the battery life is around 10-12 hours...and they have AC adapters so if you are in the house or near an outlet, you don't have to wear out your batteries.)

 

PS: It never hurts to check Craigslist if you're looking for a real great deal on an electric guitar. Sometimes it's not a bad idea to check the used market first to see what's out there....and you never know...you might find a LP 100 (or even a Standard) for a cheaper price, and with a case vs. what you would have to buy the LP 100 for, new.

 

Best of luck...

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I'm going to suggest for you:

The vintage G-400.

299 bucks. Gets you solid mahogany body, SET mahogany neck, and being an SG it's going to be lighter to learn on then a paul.

Which is great for just starting out.

 

The LP-100 is bolt-neck, which puts a dent on sustain and playability in the upper frets.

Also, I don't trust the wood used in it or the G-310.

 

The quilt top seems like an odd choice for a scratch n' dent, but it would be a better idea due to the more consistent wood and set neck, plus the looks are VERY nice. It is on the upper end of your budget, which isn't good because your amp budget should be a concern as well.

 

When I was starting out, tube amps weren't available for under well...

anywhere near my beginner budget.

 

Now you can get an epiphone valve junior combo for $150.

 

 

But the best news is:

You live in paradise. I love the keys, man.

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Rbc,

 

Welcome to the forum.

Sentry and Iansmitchell have already covered most of the basics. I'm sure a lot of others will have more to say....(SGs are very popular around here)

 

Keep in mind the importance of a good case...especially since you are around high humidity.

Cases, although not that expensive, are not free either.

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I bought my 100 about 6 months ago, it's my 3rd guitar, second electric. It is a great instrument, limitations acknowledged. One of the most important things is to make sure it is set up correctly from the start. String height, intonation, etc. are important if you want to get the best sound and playability from any guitar, but, IMO it is critical for a "lower end" model.

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Hey guys thanks for your replies.

I would never take an electric guitar out on the water, it is hard enough to keep a boat running properly in salt water. HA

Anyway now I am really confused.

Go for a scratch/dent G400 or the LP 100?

My biggest concern as a beginner is which one will be easiest to learn on?

Any opinions on the Traynor AMP? For some reason it caught my eye?

 

Is an Epiphone amp somehow designed to really work better with an EPI guitar?

 

Any preference on new strings with easy to play in mind?

 

I do keep an eye on Craig's list but not much local activity.

 

Looking forward to hearing what you gents think.

 

rbc

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Hey guys thanks for your replies.

I would never take an electric guitar out on the water' date=' it is hard enough to keep a boat running properly in salt water. HA

Anyway now I am really confused.

Go for a scratch/dent G400 or the LP 100?

My biggest concern as a beginner is which one will be easiest to learn on?

Any opinions on the Traynor AMP? For some reason it caught my eye?

 

Is an Epiphone amp somehow designed to really work better with an EPI guitar?

 

Any preference on new strings with easy to play in mind?

 

I do keep an eye on Craig's list but not much local activity.

 

Looking forward to hearing what you gents think.

 

rbc

 

[/quote']

 

I think the main thing is to start with a guitar with low action (the strings are close to the frets, without buzzing). This will make the guitar much easier to play. If you stay interested you'll be buying a new guitar soon enough

 

You really should look at a used guitar. Like cars, brand new guitars loose a lot of value as soon as you walk out of the store. If you buy a used one, you would be able to sell it for about the same price a year or two later.

 

The strings found on most guitars are .10's, that means the high e is .10. There are heavier strings, and many people like them for various reasons but .10's seems to be the best compromise for sound and playability.

 

An EPi amp is not designed to work better with an Epi guitar. There is no correlation between amps and guitars, it's simply a matter of building your sound. However, EPi does have some really nice amps for great prices. Epi has the Valve Junior line which are really nice sounding.

 

I would recommend a trip to Miami to visit guitar stores and try as many guitars as you can. A mail order guitar may work for someone who knows exactly what they are going to get, but I would not recommend it for a beginner. Before you go, make sure the store stocks EPi's, not all do. Guitar Center usually has a good selection. You may also want to set up appointments with some of the Miami Craig List guitars while you're there.

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i'm a beginner too and i have a vintage g-400

they're so easy to learn on and i can play iron man, slts, dream on, smoke on the water and sunshine of your love and i've had it for a week and had 3 lessons

 

i've got a line 6 spider 3 30w they are very good for the effects on them but i suggest u get a micro cube and save up for the 75 w as it had 3 more channels and lots of extra features ;)

 

love my g-400 though slightly neck heavy half the weight of a les paul

 

choose the sound and feel u like and dont be forced into buying a guitar because its a "good offer" by the one you want to play

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Everyone knows I like the epi VJr.. I've got three right now.

But.. I do suggest that a solid state amp is really sometimes a better choice for a kid starting out.

 

Instant on, for example is nice compared to a two minute wait for the vjs to warm up.

 

Another thing is the vj is kind of hard to appreciate at low volume.. to get the best tone out of those tubes, you're going to be pretty loud.

Louder than mom and dad want, louder than wife and kids want, louder than roomates want.

 

Also, the vjr wont do much for loud cleans.. that is.. when you're jamming out with pals, drummer, etc.. and want clean tones, the vj

will have some problem keeping up.. clean wise.

 

a solid state practice amp is handy for louder cleans.. and for practicing at lower volume...it will typically have the features a person should learn to use.

for instance.. we all like reverb, we all know we like pedals so an efx loop is handy.

 

I would look at a small maybe .. 30 watt?.. ss state amp with reverb, efx loop, and a gain control..

 

that would give you enough volume cranked up... clean and overdriven.. plus some nice warming reverb.. and the loop for trying out various other efx pedals as you go along.

 

Starting and stopping a tube amp is hard on it.. and we all know that beginners will fire up for short periods.. this wont hurt a SS amp one bit.

But it will wear out tubes.

 

the g400 in question is the better deal.. no doubt about that.

 

And while I recommend, EASILY, a vjr as a second amp.. a wonderful introduction into real TONE and response..

a ss practice amp.. maybe something with CD input and headphone output..!!... is a handy intelligent tool that you'll appreciate

for as long as you own it.

 

check online reviews, harmonycentral.com, for reviews of each amp you are interested in.

 

you'll save money with a behringer... and I've owned one and it worked fine.. very inexpensive, plenty of patch features.. nice tones for SS.

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Everyone knows I like the epi VJr.. I've got three right now.

But.. I do suggest that a solid state amp is really sometimes a better choice for a kid starting out.

 

Instant on' date=' for example is nice compared to a two minute wait for the vjs to warm up.

[b']Well, how long did it take YOU to tune your guitar just starting out? Two minutes isn't a problem if he tunes while it warms up.[/b]

Another thing is the vj is kind of hard to appreciate at low volume.. to get the best tone out of those tubes, you're going to be pretty loud.

Doesn't everyone starting out wanna be loud?

Louder than mom and dad want, louder than wife and kids want, louder than roomates want.

 

Also, the vjr wont do much for loud cleans.. that is.. when you're jamming out with pals, drummer, etc.. and want clean tones, the vj

will have some problem keeping up.. clean wise.

 

a solid state practice amp is handy for louder cleans.. and for practicing at lower volume...it will typically have the features a person should learn to use.

No, not really. SS cleans are cold and brittle. And you're not going to get a high-enough power SS amp to stay clean and jam with friends for 150 bucks.

for instance.. we all like reverb, we all know we like pedals so an efx loop is handy.

 

I would look at a small maybe .. 30 watt?.. ss state amp with reverb, efx loop, and a gain control..

 

that would give you enough volume cranked up... clean and overdriven.. plus some nice warming reverb.. and the loop for trying out various other efx pedals as you go along.

 

Starting and stopping a tube amp is hard on it.. and we all know that beginners will fire up for short periods.. this wont hurt a SS amp one bit.

But it will wear out tubes.

How much is a tube change? I think unless you go EVH on tubes(use a stage light dimmer), you're not gonna wear a set down in under 6 months.

 

the g400 in question is the better deal.. no doubt about that.

 

And while I recommend, EASILY, a vjr as a second amp.. a wonderful introduction into real TONE and response..

a ss practice amp.. maybe something with CD input and headphone output..!!... is a handy intelligent tool that you'll appreciate

for as long as you own it.

 

check online reviews, harmonycentral.com, for reviews of each amp you are interested in.

 

you'll save money with a behringer... and I've owned one and it worked fine.. very inexpensive, plenty of patch features.. nice tones for SS.

Ehhh....

 

Behringers, have worse tones than the SS crates I've used.

 

 

IMO, all of it.

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+1 for the g-400 i think it will last you for awhile .. and its only a lil more than the lp 100 .. the lp100 is lighter than your standard lp .. the body is thinner .. does it give a les paul tone ? close but not really due to the thinner body .. but i had a g-400 and it played and sounded like a dream for only 349.00 ... or u can get the vintage for 299.00 ..

 

the roland cube gets alot appraise ..

 

my mistake was i cheaped out on my first electric and got a les paul special II and i ended up selling it and getting better gear .. so i suggest you go for the gold =D

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LP 100 is a good guitar for a beginner but you could get a studio for sixty buck more. Thats probably what I would go for or the quilted LP. They're just a better feeling guitar IMO. The LP 100 hasn't got the body weight of the studio, standard, or quilted and also the sustain isn't quite there either because of the bolt on neck. As far as the amps go, the roland 15 and 30 aren't bad but they are alittle pricey. I was going to get a cube 30 but decided to go with the line 6 30w because of the crunch and insane channels. They're great. Check em out. You could also look at Marshalls, Vox, and Epiphone amps. You should be able to get a decent amp for practice for around 150 dollars. Fender also makes a pretty decent amp.

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one point at a time.

 

we're talking only about the guy who wants to flip it on.. get fifteen mintues in and go on to something else.

Nothing else. I don't how you tune, ian, but I pick my guitar up everyday and rarely have to tune for a long at ten seconds?

Perhaps you should get your guitar set up?

 

 

some people take their actual situation into account when they decide how loud they want to be.

the vj is loud.. period. you want tube tone out of five watts, you push it.. you can't get around that.

My admonition is to take that into consideration.. what is HIS playing/pratice situation.

To ignore that is to invite problems.

 

 

deriding SS tone to me is pretty silly when it's clear to anyone and everyone in here that I tout tube tone over SS period.

a solid state amp at 30 watts will keep up with a drummer. If youhave kieth moon, you wont be as happy.

of course solid state is cold or brittle compared to tubes.. we all know that. but for practice? good grief.. how anal would it be to reject them

on that alone?

 

 

the simple fact of the matter is that snapping the amp on and off is hard on it. it's hard on the tubes. for instance, you're better off leaving the thing on for an hour than you are turning it off and coming back.

all through your reply you seem to not be replying to what my clear intention was.

 

I appreciate your opinion on behringers tone.. however, it's one opinion.

 

Allow me to make clear what I thought I had made clear.

 

A SS state practice amp, around 30 watts, with a few nice features is available from several manufacturers.

this will allow more use. headphones.. jam with cd.. clean and overdriven.. probably reverb maybe even chorus..

all at a low price..

it will not produce tube tones.

It will be an amp you can keep for these reasons, for many years.

 

I advise ANY beginner to consider solid state first.. with the best features for practice.. over an epi vjr which has NO features and

requires additional pedals, etc. to achieve anything BUT tube tone.

 

It's practical advice. And ought to be seen as a viable alternative.. esp. given the fact that the Epi is so inexpensive, one can always

pick it up later.

 

In short. think of practical matters.. think of cost.. and consider an amp thats going to work toward making you practice more often and

happily. An SS amp can do that.

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Gents,thanks for all your input.

 

I think where I am at is the Vintage G 400 and Roland Micro cube. I guess that was my output from your input.

 

I will probably call MF shortly and talk to them about strings and cables,etc.

 

Let you know in a week or so how this shakes out.

 

rbc

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That thing's a pretty good amp for the price. Almost makes me think about getting it and putting the remainder of the money towards my GAS ^^

 

They're great if you're jamming at acoustic level, or if you're travelling, or even camping. There's a lot of wallop in that tiny little amplifier, and for the size, they're quite loud.

 

(And with a headphone jack, you can line it out into PA equipment.)

 

It's certainly the right price. I recently sold mine and upgraded to the Street Performer which has a mic jack, but I still miss my little microcube. It's perfect for practicing in the bedroom.

 

(The only thing I can say against it is if you're jamming with anything louder than a piano, and there's no PA, then you'll probably need a bigger amp. It also doesn't have foot switches, but sheesh...look at the price. It's comparable with a lot of practice amps that aren't portable, and has quite a few samplers and effects.)

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I probably won't be gigging/jamming much anywhere that I wouldn't have accessibility to something larger (or a PA) -- my primary friend I jam with has a 100W Vox in his closet, so if all else fails :D

 

I'm now getting acoustic GAS too. This isn't healthy...

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I probably won't be gigging/jamming much anywhere that I wouldn't have accessibility to something larger (or a PA) -- my primary friend I jam with has a 100W Vox in his closet' date=' so if all else fails :D

 

I'm now getting acoustic GAS too. This isn't healthy...[/quote']

 

Eh, the Microcube does help out a lot with acoustic GAS. Because it's portable, I barely touch my Alvarez acoustic anymore, and during the 1990's I probably plucked more on that vs. my Ibanez or Strat.

 

(There's also this issue with recording as well on acoustics. It's just so much easier to use an electric to record with for a good tone.)

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