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Jazz amp question?


BlueLesPaul2006

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Any good "Clean" amp will work. Lots of "Jazz" players like "Polytone" brand amps. Small,

powerful and very clean sounding. Then again, some still prefer "tube" amps, for their warmth.

Running it, again, in the cleanest settings, unless you're after some "blues" type tube distortion.

Fender Deluxe Reverb, would be plently loud, for most Jazz applications, unless it was a very large

venue. Then, you either mic it, or use something along the line of a Twin Reverb, or in larger, solid state

"clean" amp, the Roland Jazz Chorus 120 would be a good choice. But, it's quite loud, and heavy...

Best thing to do, is try as many different types, as possible. You'll know the tone you want, when you

hear it, no doubt. Roland "Cube" series amps, are also a good place to start. Especially, the Cube 30,

or Cube 60.

 

A lot of that "Jazz" tone, is achieved by rolling back the tone knob to the point where it's not "muddy"

yet, but Almost...in other words, not completely off, but just to the point where the treble starts to be

noticable. Works on any guitar, but is best on full hollowbody "Jazz boxes," or even the thinline 335

types. Sheraton, Dot, Joe Pass, Byrdland, Broadway, etc.

 

Hope that helps, some...

 

CB

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Yeah that does help. I just got a Sheraton today through a trade its a 1991. The line 6 amp that i have has clean tone but I cant seem to dial in a nice warm tone. I will take your advice and play a bunch of different amps to see if I I can find something that gives me the tone I am looking for.

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Joe Pass actually used a "Polytone" amp, quite often "live!" So, that might be a good

place for you to start. They're not "Cheap," though...so, I don't know what your budget

might be, but unless you can find a good...less expensive used (but not abused) one,

they'll be up in the same area (or higher), price wise, as the Deluxe Reverb, or some of the other

Fender tube amps. The Roland "Cube" amps, are another really good little amp, for a very

reasonable price. They have several voicings, too...so, if you want to do some "blues" or

Rock, they can handle that, as well.

 

CB

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I use a Fender ultralite Jazzmaster (or something like that). 200 watts, very light (important to we elderly) and killer tone. I have heard Joe would often run thru the PA if it was adequate instead of draggin a lot of stuff around. A lot of his tone comes from him and his ax.

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According to:

http://www.jazzguitar.be/joe_pass_guitar.html

Joe pass played mainly a Polytone Brute.

 

But IMHO, this is the best amplifier on the market for jazz:

http://www.music123.com/Fender-65-Deluxe-Reverb-Combo-Amp-480507-i1145363.Music123

 

It has insane tone. All you need to do is dial down the treble on your guitar, and you have a jazz tone that will melt your crowd.

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According to:

http://www.jazzguitar.be/joe_pass_guitar.html

Joe pass played mainly a Polytone Brute.

 

But IMHO' date=' this is the best amplifier on the market for jazz:

http://www.music123.com/Fender-65-Deluxe-Reverb-Combo-Amp-480507-i1145363.Music123

 

It has insane tone. All you need to do is dial down the treble on your guitar, and you have a jazz tone that will melt your crowd.[/quote']

 

Thanks for the links. I will for sure go play that fender. I has looked at the Fender hotrod deluxe but that is more of a blues tone I think. I will go check out that fender 65. I do not know much about Fender as I am nore of an Epiphone and Gibson man. I'm also going to look into getting the Epi Joe Pass emperor. That way I will be sure to get that sweet warm jazz tone.

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Hi BlueLesPaul2006,

 

You might also consider using flat wound strings on your Sheraton if you are looking for a somewhat less "bright" tone from your guitar. Thomasik-Infield (don't know about the correct spelling) strings are considered by many jazz folks to be great strings for that fat jazz tone that Joe Pass was known for.

 

I have a Sheraton II set up for jazz and with my Polytone Mini Brute it sounds great. But if you do this you will have to have another 335 style guitar set up for blues, and another one for that Beatles era sound....

 

You can see where this is going. You need to have a guitar set up for different musical styles and tastes. At least that is a good way of justifying GAS for more guitars and amps!

 

Good luck on your search for the perfect combination of amp, guitar, strings for that Joe Pass jazz tone!

 

Rich

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Thanks for the links. I will for sure go play that fender. I has looked at the Fender hotrod deluxe but that is more of a blues tone I think. I will go check out that fender 65. I do not know much about Fender as I am nore of an Epiphone and Gibson man. I'm also going to look into getting the Epi Joe Pass emperor. That way I will be sure to get that sweet warm jazz tone.

 

The hotrod deluxe is excellent for Jazz also. If the reverb deluxe is too much money, consider buying the hot rod deluxe. Keep in mind that Wes Montgomery used fender tube amps.

http://www.jazzguitar.be/wes_montgomery_guitar.html

 

I have owned a fender twin reverb, hot rod deluxe, blues junior, and blues deluxe. As far as jazz sound, the twin reverb was the best. But, it was very difficult to hear the difference between all of them.

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Look into the Vox AD series. I have no idea if they are good for gigging-so if that's what you need this might not be right for you. For home and studio I have a little 15 watt Vox AD15 that is very versatile-can definitely do jazz, as well as anything else really. I can't believe how nice hybrid amps sound these days. They have 10 amp simulations or something close to that (Vox AC15 and 30 are very good..couple Fenders simulated (Twin and Bassman I believe), Clean and OD Mesa Boogie (I think..denoted as "boutique" on dial ) and Marshalls. So very versatile...jazz would work well on several of those settings, plus you also get some decent effects; reverb, tremolo, delay, leslie, chorus, phaser...few more...can only use 2 at a time, but that's ok if this isn't a gigging amp. And maybe it is anyway, cos you aren't gonna use much in effects for jazz. They have 30, 50, 100 watt models too. They aren't pricey really either, at least the 15 and 30 are pretty easily reachable.

 

Since we are on Epiphones site I'll say their Blues Custom 30 can get a good jazz tone too...though it is a little *dirty* (and thankgod it is, that's what I like about it) But it would definitely work, and you could definitely gig with that, np, especially if miked...I'm not usually playing sans grit, my Boss Blues Driver is always on, and I play on the clean channel-all dirtied up by the Boss, and I use the guitar vol for control, so a good assesment of the BC's headroom isn't something I feel I can give you. So, to cut above a drummer, I don't know if you'll lose your cleanliness too soon for your taste. But miked through a good pa you'd be golden. You can probably get to 4 or 5 I'd say before you start to OD on the clean channel. That's a rough assesment. Love that 15 watt Class A option too. The BC 30 is really a little bit Voxy IMO...a poor man's AC30 in some ways.

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What about pedals? Are there any what you guys would suggest that would complement the jazz tone? I think I'm going to try out the Fender' date=' Vox, and polytone amps to see what ones I like. But I'm wondering if there are any pedals that would add that little extra touch of sweet tone. [/quote']

 

You may have a hard time finding a polytone amp to try out. The fender and Vox you will should find with no problem. I have preface this with saying my playing is about 80% jazz. I play for a jazz ensemble. I know a lot of other jazz players also. I don't use any pedals for jazz and I have not known of any other jazz players that do. Traditional jazz tone is "clean" tone. However, I will say that I do have my reverb at about 4 when I play. And that is it.

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Well until i can save the money to get a Jazz type amp I have to make due with the amps that I have. I have a Line 6 Spider III 15w, and a Randall 15w. Can anyone give me some idea how to set up the tone to get a better sound? My problem is that I know about the guitar side of playing but I'm behind with my knowledge on amps and tone settings. since I'm just starting with jazz I really am behind on the settings for this style.

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I don't see traditional Jazz guitarist using pedals, that much (if at all?).

Some that do both Jazz and Fusion, will use distortion, chorus, compressor/sustainer

pedals, as well as a Wah, Wah...now and then. Some might use some "slap back echo," at times.

But, mostly, it's in their guitar/amp tone, and their FINGERS! Remember, the old guys, didn't have

all these "pedals," to choose from. They were like the old "Blues" guys...just a guitar and and amp.

Set differently, most likely, but they kept it simple! (Editorial Statement, to follow)...We'd be well advised, to follow

that lead, a bit more often, nowadays. IMHO, of course.

 

CB

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I don't see traditional Jazz guitarist using pedals' date=' that much (if at all?).

Some that do both Jazz and Fusion, will use distortion, chorus, compressor/sustainer

pedals, as well as a Wah, Wah...now and then. Some might use some "slap back echo," at times.

But, mostly, it's in their guitar/amp tone, and their FINGERS! Remember, the old guys, didn't have

all these "pedals," to choose from. They were like the old "Blues" guys...just a guitar and and amp.

Set differently, most likely, but they kept it simple! (Editorial Statement, to follow)...We'd be well advised, to follow

that lead, a bit more often, nowadays. IMHO, of course.

 

CB[/quote']

 

Absolutely. About 80% of jazz tone comes from the player. Drop the pick for a while and try playing chords with your fingers. Roll down the treble a bit also.

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