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collin

re: any sense here?

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I ve been playing for two .5 years and i have a gibson lp studio, and some unknown classical guitar with a cutaway. I am getting a new guitar soon, and i wonder how useful a epi double neck guitar would be compared to a epi BB king guitar at this point to someone at my skill level. I mean there a few songs that i like that are played on a double neck and well more people (famous) play archtops like BB king's guitar or es 335 etc. Well what do you think?

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A double neck is definitely a guitar for very specific purposes. It's also expensive and on top of that it is heavy and uncomfortable to play; neither of the two necks is at the proper height (one too high, one too low). No, I think you'd get more satisfaction out of the Lucille or even a Dot.

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I've never owned a double neck, but it seems to me a Lucille would be a lot more fun and versatile unless you're in a Led Zeppelin cover band. Not that I wouldn't mind owning one, but from the description of the guitars you own, it doesn't seem like a logical next step.

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I recommend a good steel-string acoustic. For the same price as an Epiphone Lucille, and less than the G-1275, you can get a nice US-made Martin, or a Masterbilt. A hundred or two more (still under the cost of the G-1275), you can get a Gibson Songmaker.

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Everyone's probably sick of hearing it by now, but I looooove my Lucille. Coolest guitar I've ever played much less owned. O:) Gotta love the 335 body without the f holes, feels and looks amazing and plays wonderfully.

 

Also I have to agree about the double-neck - great when it's appropriate but that's not all that often. Plus it's heavy ...

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It really depends on what you want to do with your prospective purchase. You've got a nice solid body electric guitar in your Gibson LP Studio. Presumably your classical guitar is a nylon strung Spanish style guitar. So, the question is do you mostly want to play songs which are 'acoustic only' or do you aspire to play tracks which are played with an archtop? If you like acoustic songs, an acoustic guitar which also has a pickup might be useful both now and later on if you want to play to bigger audiences. Note- You won't really be able to do a 'Collin Unplugged' style performance with an archtop although you'll undoubtedly be able to get very nice 'clean' electric sounds.

 

So, I believe you should ask yourself:

 

What music do I want to play that I can't already play with my current gear?

What style of guitar do the artists who play these songs use?

 

When you have a style of guitar which ticks the most boxes in terms of songs you want to play then go ahead and ask for advice on the best models. Bear in mind though that you will probably be able to play many songs that have been played on an archtop using your Les Paul.

 

I do agree that if you're aiming to get two guitars for the price of one, a double neck is not necessarily a good idea.

 

Does this help at all?

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Ditto the previous responses. A double neck should not be your main guitar. As stated, it's heavy, and uncomfortable to play. It is not balanced well. Very "top heavy".

 

As Rotcan stated, I find also concerning the neck heights are "just not confortable". It's a guitar that is better played sitting down, unless you have strong shoulders.

 

Keep the studio, and buy the DN later when you want ANOTHER guitar.

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ES%201275%20D%20front.jpg

 

collin,

 

Let's face it, a double-neck is strictly an attention-getter! It's showy and great for onstage, but I doubt anyone records with one. Serious players who want a 12-string and a 6-string will buy two guitars.

 

If you have a serious stage career after 2-1/2 years, then get an ES-1275. If you want to improve your playing, get a 335-family semi-hollowbody guitar (i.e., a Dot). They are very versatile and can be used in a wide range of music--rock, country, blues, jazz, you name it! Cheers, and good luck with your playing.

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On double necks, if you show up wearing one of those, you better be able to play it like a god or people will fall over laughing at you.

 

There is only one good reason to own one and that is if you are a pro player in a Led Zep tribute band. Buy the BB King and save yourself a lot of embarrassment.

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