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Hmmm ... What Makes a Florentine a "Florentine"?


midiman56

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http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/Features/meet-your-may-limited-run-506/

 

Another week, another "Limited Edition". I always thought LP Florentines were semi-hollow with an "F" hole. Experts here should know the real scoop. This one looks okay ... for a $4500 guitar.

 

Oh well, variety is the spice of life, I guess!

 

Jim

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"Florentine" refers to the shape of the cutaway when it ends in a sharply pointed horn, as on the ES-175 or ES-295. "Venetian" refers to a rounded cutaway, as on the current L-5, Broadway or Byrdland.

 

The terms originate from design styles popular in Italy in violin making (not on cutaways as we know them on guitars, but on the other lines of the violin). "Florentine" was the style popular in Firenze (or Florence) and does not mean there's spinach involved, as would be the case with Eggs Florentine or other "Florentine" food. The rounded shape was associated with Venezia (Venice), hence Venetian. No "blindness" involved either!

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"Florentine" refers to the shape of the cutaway when it ends in a sharply pointed horn' date=' as on the ES-175 or ES-295. "Venetian" refers to a rounded cutaway, as on the current L-5, Broadway or Byrdland.

 

The terms originate from design styles popular in Italy in violin making (not on cutaways as we know them on guitars, but on the other lines of the violin). "Florentine" was the style popular in Firenze (or Florence) and does not mean there's spinach involved, as would be the case with Eggs Florentine or other "Florentine" food. The rounded shape was associated with Venezia (Venice), hence Venetian. No "blindness" involved either![/quote']

 

+1 My Dad's Es225T has a florentine cutaway

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"Florentine" refers to the shape of the cutaway when it ends in a sharply pointed horn' date=' as on the ES-175 or ES-295. "Venetian" refers to a rounded cutaway, as on the current L-5, Broadway or Byrdland.

 

The terms originate from design styles popular in Italy in violin making (not on cutaways as we know them on guitars, but on the other lines of the violin). "Florentine" was the style popular in Firenze (or Florence) and does not mean there's spinach involved, as would be the case with Eggs Florentine or other "Florentine" food. The rounded shape was associated with Venezia (Venice), hence Venetian. No "blindness" involved either![/quote']

 

Parabar, what is it about the violin luthier styles in Florence or Venice that lend themselves to the naming of a cutaway style for guitars? I thought it had to do with styles of mandolins or, alternatively, were merely lables that Orville Gibson came up with to distinguish the cutaways. But I have no real historical information to back it up. Interesting topic of discussion, to come up with the etymology of Florentine cutaways as opposed to Venetian. Maybe you are right and has to do with the mitering involved in a Florentine. Hmmm ...

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