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I am quite a traditional player, I have never used pedals besides what my band members use

But now after witnessing the kind of variation they can provide, I think I am going to

invest some money in some

 

Has anyone got any suggestions?

 

I use a Vox VT100 live (I absolutely love the tones I can get out of it, I feel lost without it)

And a Vox VT30 at home

 

My two main guitars are an Epiphone Les Paul Custom and an Epiphone Sheraton II

 

And occasionally I use my Fender Deluxe Power Stratocaster

 

I know this is a lovely guitar, however I am at heart a Les Paul man

and only occasionally use the Stratocaster, for more technically challenging songs

Or for the certain tone it provides :)

 

I am looking for probably mid price range

 

Good pedals for a reasonable price, give me afew choices people :)

 

Thank you in advance for any input given :)

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Seems you are a VOX-Man

 

What about the VOX ToneLab ST (~200EURO)

with it you can make your (amp)sounds footswichable

 

Peter

 

I've been looking at this too Peter. It's new so there aren't many reviews or youtube clips as yet, but it looks like a fantastic little floor unit. Have you got one?

 

Alan

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Aren't the Vox VT series SS with effects already on them? If so, it don't make much sense to me adding, or buying, more of pretty much the same things......I mean is it worth the money? I'm talking modulation types. As far as ODs the only reason I'd put one in front of a SS amp would be for coloring. It's not like you're pushing anything...or the reason I use them for anyways.

 

IMO, and I've mentioned this so many times most find it boring by know I think. But an EQ pedal will do more for you as far as getting new sounds than most pedals.

 

If you just got a case of GAS, like we all get, might check with some of them loopers. Lots of fun when you can't get with anybody, and a great practice tool. Probably use it more then a most of the noise making pedals.

 

Anyhow didn't mean to steer you in a different direction, just it seems to me the reason for buying those amps with effects already on them was so one wouldn't have to buy more later. Then again what do I know...I don't care to much for those type amps. LOL, seems like so much shiiiit (let's see that get swapped with fricking yeehaw) can go wrong with them...got enough troubles with tube amps.

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I have been in the same place as you -- I never used pedals, but thought why not give one a go.

So I just bought this, the BOSS ME-70:

 

40646.jpg

 

1. if you buy a pedal you are looking at $100 for one effect. This ME-70 has literally hundreds for about $250!

2. the sounds are really good (just check out any demo on youtube)

3. it is fun as hell. Mix effects, do what you want, create your own -- I even created a sitar effect.

4. reverb, delay, overdrive, distortion, flanger, phaser, compression, Leslie effect, Marshall amp, Vox amp, Fender amp, and on and on. Hundreds of effects and settings....what this unit offers is unbelievable. It's all in there.

 

Once again - you can pay $100 for one effect or $250 for hundreds.

This ME-70 is the way to go if you want to dabble in effects.

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I have been in the same place as you -- I never used pedals' date=' but thought why not give one a go.

So I just bought this, the BOSS ME-70:

 

[img']http://www.bonnersmusic.co.uk/file_store/40646.jpg[/img]

 

1. if you buy a pedal you are looking at $100 for one effect. This ME-70 has literally hundreds for about $250!

2. the sounds are really good (just check out any demo on youtube)

3. it is fun as hell. Mix effects, do what you want, create your own -- I even created a sitar effect.

4. reverb, delay, overdrive, distortion, flanger, phaser, compression, Leslie effect, Marshall amp, Vox amp, Fender amp, and on and on. Hundreds of effects and settings....what this unit offers is unbelievable. It's all in there.

 

Once again - you can pay $100 for one effect or $250 for hundreds.

This ME-70 is the way to go if you want to dabble in effects.

 

 

Yup, +1!

bossgt-6a.jpg

If the factory presets are maddening enuff for ya'... You'll have the complete

luxury of tweaking them 'til you can't stand yerself...:-s

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Yep. I've got the ME-50 too. I like it a lot. Great Boss tones.

The only drawback is that you have to buy another switch to go "Bank Up", or "Bank Down".

 

You'll see in the pic that I also have another A-B switch, at the top.

This one is to switch between guitars.

The one on the bottom is Bank Up/Down.

 

 

 

003.jpg

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Just matters what your going for. I'm simplistic. I like one pedal for one thing.

You can pick 'em up used like I do off Craig's List or evil Bay relatively inexpensive.

I have just a few for my tone. Tuner>CFH Dunlop Wah>DOD YJM308 OD>Metal Muff Dist>

Noise Gate. I might add a chorus. But all the other stuff can also discolor your

original tone.

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If you want a low cost set of individual pedals, the Behringer range is surprisingly good for the prices. You can hear demos on their website so you can work out which ones you want. I've owned several, then gradually upgraded to secondhand Boss equivalents. Here in the UK Behringer are about one third of the cost of Boss.

 

Last year I played about 40 gigs with 3 Behringers on my pedal board (flanger, digital delay, acoustic simulator) and no problems. The plastic case and cheap switches won't last as many years as a Boss pedal, so you have to look after them a bit more. I just sold mine, they were still in full working order but I was looking to upgrade everything in the chain to cut down on noise. My main gigging guitar is my LP with P90s; when you plug that into a 100w tube combo and turn it up to 7 you get quite enough background noise without any help from leads and pedals.

 

In case you were considering an acoustic simulator I'd point out they don't give a very authentic sound with humbuckers...an interesting tone, but not really like an acoustic. I can vouch for the Behringer flanger, delay and tube overdrive pedals.

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Thanks everyone for the input so far, I am considering all the options you have given me and weighing up what best to get, I will obviously be using when playing live, and it is more to get a variation of sounds during a single song rather then actually producing new sounds (I am quite happy with the tones my amp provides, but it doesn't hurt to have a few new sounds), To be honest I've never hardly needed pedals because basically we have two guitarists and sometimes I'll use my guitar to play little pieces over the top (I'm the singer you see), Once again, Thank you, your suggestions are valued :)

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I got a Digitech RP150 - 50 presets, 50 patches you can customize. You can customize it on your computer with a USB hookup. I really enjoy it - get some outrageous sounds out of it. I usually use it with a VJ, but you can run it into one of the clean models with the Vox and get some interesting sounds (best to shut off the cab sims, though). You can set your presets for just flanger, delay, etc. - they usually have a few different models for each, or mix.

 

Runs about $80

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I thought that one of the key purposes for a modeling amp was so that you could get multiple tones without having to drag around multiple amps and pedals? Are the Vox modeling amps not capable of producing numerous viable tones to work with? I'd always heard fairly favorable comments about those amps.

 

I see overdrive/distortion/boost pedals as being useful in two ways:

 

1: To produce distorted tones and/or increased volume from a clean amp, either tube or SS.

2: To push a tube amp into overdrive and make it louder and more gainy for soloing.

 

Since a modeling amp can produce numerous distorted tones on its own, and since it's not a tube amp that benefits from being overdriven, what purpose do pedals serve for modeling amps that the models themselves cannot produce?

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M-theory, the Vox Valvetronix AD line allows one effect to be selected for a channel. You set the channel up and save the settings. There are two channels, so you can program one to be clean and the other dirty. Either channel can use a different amp model. The two button footswitch allows you to switch channels and turn the effect on that channel on or off. So, you can have channel A clean and switch chorus in and out with the footswitch and have channel B dirty and switch an effect on and off when using that channel. Past that, you have to have foot pedals. The new VT series has more effects and combinations that can be created. The Vox sound is very gig worthy.

 

OTOH, my Peavey Vypyr Tube 60 (replacing my Vox) has 400 presets that you can use to save modeling setups and switch between them using the Peavey Sanpera pedal board. Granted, 400 is too many to actually deal with on stage, but you can copy them back and forth to suit. I usually set up bank A, B, and C with what I use on stage. That way, I can select Bank A for one type of music and switch back and forth with 4 foot switches to select each of 4 presets and select bank B or C for other types. Each bank has 4 presets. You can pick 1 of 12 stompboxes, 1 of 12 amp models and choose clean or dirty for each model, 1 of 12 rack effects, and delay and reverb for a preset as well as setting up different tone, pre and post gain, You can pretty much set up the amp using all the controls and save that to a preset.

 

The good part is that all the effects and stompboxes are very useable and sound nice. I've found that I don't need anything outboard to perform with this amp. It is a true 12AX7/dual 6L6 60 watt power amp with analog SS preamp driven by fairly accurate digital amp modeling.

 

My Roland Cube 60 is not as flexible as the Vox or the Peavey. Channel 1 is a JC120 ( I think) model that is always a nice clean amp (think Fender Twin sound). Channel 2 is completely programmable and there are 11 presets from Boutique to metal high gain, plus a proprietary model that is touch sensitive called Dyna-Amp. This one is quite sensitive to picking dynamics and emulates a tube amp that is set on the edge of distortion. I usually stay on that setting. Channel 2 has a drive control that compensates for pickup output. This lets you set the channel for overdrive with the guitar cranked and you can clean it up by backing off 1/4 turn on the guitar. I like that setting.

 

All three have Tap control to set the frequency of delay, tremelo, etc to match the tempo of the music you are playing.

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