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smips65

painted stop bar question

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#-o

 

I'm going for some new strings this weekend, and was thinking of stringing

my lester like so....

 

 

 

MyLester-2.jpg

 

 

Mine is painted all black, so there is some concern on my part that the paint/finish would be worn off.

 

Anybody here have a similar guitar, and have tried this?

 

1000190i.jpg

 

Thanks[cool]

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smips65,

 

I don't hve an answer for you on the stop bar (I think it would be OK). I don't mean to hijack your thread, but I keep noticing your lovely Zephyr in your signaure picture, and wondered what you thought about it.

 

By the way that trans-black LP is a looker, too.

 

Red 333

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Another member here suggested trying some black electrical tape to me for my Prephecy LP which also has a black bridge. Might be worth a shot.

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I sting all of my stopbar guitars like that. Also, I have gold hardware on most of my guitars, and it DOES ware, but only where the strings touch the tail-piece. Meaning if you keep the strings that way you can't see the damage. I don't really care m'self, as the gold-plate is starting to deteriorate anyways. Your black looks nice though. If it's plated like the gold it WILL ware so... Your call, I guess.

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Nice finish.

I'm just about to do the same, I expect it will wear the paint off in places, but I'll just waft some aerosol paint over it a couple of times a year when I change strings.

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This might seem really stupid, but why is everyone wanting to wrap the strings around their stopbars? To my thinking, and please correct me if I'm wrong, but the increased angle from the bridge to the stopbar that you have when the strings are strung through in the stock configuration add to the sustain, much as the 17 deg. angle on the headstocks add some sustain over the 14 deg. units because of the extra down force. Am I wrong in thinking that? Also from a mechanical standpoint you are adding a twisting force to the studs, instead of just a pulling force. I wish my Jr had a stopbar and tune-o-matic, I can look at the mounting studs and see that the bridge is trying to "twist" the studs. Just my thoughts...........

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but the increased angle from the bridge to the stopbar that you have when the strings are strung through in the stock configuration add to the sustain' date=' much as the 17 deg. angle on the headstocks add some sustain over the 14 deg. units because of the extra down force. Am I wrong in thinking that? Also from a mechanical standpoint you are adding a twisting force to the studs, instead of just a pulling force. I wish my Jr had a stopbar and tune-o-matic, I can look at the mounting studs and see that the bridge is trying to "twist" the studs. Just my thoughts........... [/quote']

 

 

I was thinking that the angle from the stop bar to the bridge is too steep on mine, due to the 3 pup configuration.

The bridge is adjusted as far up as can be.

 

1000199.jpg

 

1000200.jpg

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I was thinking that the angle from the stop bar to the bridge is too steep on mine' date=' due to the 3 pup configuration.

The bridge is adjusted as far up as can be.

 

[img']http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/2535/1000199.jpg[/img]

 

1000200.jpg

 

 

 

You are collapsing your bridge like that. I see it all the time and the Epi hardware is not too forgiving in that matter.

 

Raise your TP or top wrap it. The break angle behind the bridge should be no more than the headstock angle, and ideally a little less. Having the TP screwed all the way to the face of the guitar is almost never a good idea.

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You are collapsing your bridge like that. I see it all the time and the Epi hardware is not too forgiving in that matter.

 

.

Just how common is the bridge collapse issue??? I've read about it' date=' but have never seen it, personally or otherwise - any pics ? I can't forsee the string tension being great enough to "collapse" a piece of metal that large (relatively speaking). Perhaps the collapsed bridges is due to a faulty run of bridge pieces, as opposed to being the result of an extreme string break angle ? I've got my stopbar slammed, and if the bridge collapses, it'll give me an excuse to upgrade[biggrin']

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Just how common is the bridge collapse issue??? I've read about it' date=' but have never seen it, personally or otherwise - any pics ? I can't forsee the string tension being great enough to "collapse" a piece of metal that large (relatively speaking). Perhaps the collapsed bridges is due to a faulty run of bridge pieces, as opposed to being the result of an extreme string break angle ? I've got my stopbar slammed, and if the bridge collapses, it'll give me an excuse to upgrade[biggrin']

 

I dont think it is common at all on Epiphones, or similar bridges with the thicker posts.

 

The collapsing started on older Gibsons with the thin spindle-like posts.

 

I dont think Epi owners need to worry about collapsing the bridge......except for maybe Elitist owners who have the older style thin bridge posts. If you set your tailpiece high enough so that the back of the strings do not touch the back of the bridge as they travel over the saddles, you should be OK.

 

In my experience topwrapping has more effect on tension and feel of the strings while bending and less on tone/sustain.

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I get lost in some of the terminology, but several musicians advised me to draw the stop tail bar completely against the body then adjust the bridge,action and intonation accordingly. They said it would help with string vibration and sustain. Both of my SG's are setup that way and sound incredible. Was this bad advise? It made sense to me.

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Guest icantbuyafender

for action and feel, raising the stop bar is a godsend.

 

top wrapping gives you that effect but keeps the tailpiece against the body.

 

The result is sustain for days, and a softer break angle = easier string bends.

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for action and feel' date=' raising the stop bar is a godsend.

 

top wrapping gives you that effect but keeps the tailpiece against the body.

 

The result is sustain for days, and a softer break angle = easier string bends.[/quote']

Do you have a pic for what is ideal so we are on the same page and I can fix if needs be?

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Guest icantbuyafender
Do you have a pic for what is ideal so we are on the same page and I can fix if needs be?

 

 

 

look at the original poster's image of a trans amber LP classic

 

it shows it perfectly done.

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-Is it me' date=' or does that first guitar look a bit familiar?? :- [biggrin'] [biggrin]

 

L8R,

Matt

 

 

 

Sorry bout that... it was the first one I saw with the wrapped SB. And of course it's just too pretty to keep down.

 

 

BTW Musikron, that's the way it was when I got it. Haven't done a thing with it yet. Not sure what the previous owner did, could it have come stock like this?

 

I did think the bridge was way to high, tried to get a good shot of what clearence is needed to span the pups.

 

If I spin the bridge down too much, won't the intonation go to sh!t?

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Not bridge down, tailpiece up.

 

And I would say over half the Epiphones I have seen have the collapsed issue, I fix them all the time. If you crank your TP down, you WILL collapse the bridge, end of story.

 

Set the bridge height where it needs to be for the action you want, and make the TP height conform to that. The TP is not designed to be screwed all the way in in all cases. There is a reason the TP is adjustable don't ya'll think?

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Another member here suggested trying some black electrical tape to me for my Prephecy LP which also has a black bridge. Might be worth a shot.

 

[cool]

 

Good tip' date=' I hope. Have tried it out, only noticable if you really look for it.

 

Musikron, is this more in line with your expertice?

 

 

[img']http://img534.imageshack.us/img534/864/1000201j.jpg[/img]

 

1000202e.jpg

 

 

Thanks for all the input and advice, and I agree, the action and sustain is better now, could have been a multiple number of issues, old strings, bad bridge/stop bar angle, or just my lousy playing ability.

 

:)

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:)

 

 

 

 

1000201j.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

I would screw the tailpiece down as possible' date=' and i swear the angle's still perfect.I think the angle as on the photo is too low.

Why you don't get a second tailpiece if you like to switch from topwrapped to standard?It's not that much money a tailpiece costs...

 

 

 

 

 

[/quote']

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Now that you are top wrapping you can actually bring the TP down a little bit more.

 

Look at the angle of your headstock, try to copy that. If your strings approach the back edge of the bridge, you are too low. Sometimes with the TP top wrapped, that is the time you can crank it all the way to the face. As long as the strings are staying put in the saddles you should be okay though.

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