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Can Model Name Be Learned By S/N?


tflanster

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The short answer: No.

 

The long answer: Nooooooooooo. [angry]

 

The best way to tell models apart is to look at the features on it. Biggest tell-tale is that Customs have block inlays, and Standards have trapezoids. As for the Standard tops, the Plain Top will have a plain wood top, with a variety of possible finishes. The Plus Top model will usually have a flame maple top (sometimes others,) also in a variety of finishes.

 

There is also a Les Paul Classic that is essentially a Standard, but with open coil pickups and a slimmer neck profile (I think.)

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The short answer: No.

 

The long answer: Nooooooooooo. :-$

 

The best way to tell models apart is to look at the features on it. Biggest tell-tale is that Customs have block inlays' date=' and Standards have trapezoids. As for the Standard tops, the Plain Top will have a plain wood top, with a variety of possible finishes. The Plus Top model will usually have a flame maple top (sometimes others,) also in a variety of finishes.

 

There is also a Les Paul Classic that is essentially a Standard, but with open coil pickups and a slimmer neck profile (I think.)[/quote']

 

Thanks for that. Interesting. I don't know the process, obviously, but from what you say, Epiphone/Fine Guitar Company is (or was) building the exact same body with different "cosmetics". And sure, some woods are different, but I find it hard to believe that s/n F97100008 came off the production line with no plan as to finish or installed components. Well, maybe not so hard to believe, after having looked at the many different factories and paint jobs. I did send a note to Gibson/Epi asking the same question. I'll take a closer look at the LP. It is a flamed top and I think the PU's are black, uncovered. BRB with the info.

 

I ain't arguing, just opining.

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Well, Epiphone serial numbers only contain date/location information, as I'm sure you've seen on the GDP.

F 9 7 1 0 0 0 0 8

 

Fine Guitars Korea

1997

October

#0008

 

I would imagine that if Gibson/Epiphone REALLY wanted to, they could check their own records and see exactly what guitar that serial number belonged to.

 

I presume the way they stamp is just to have every guitar go through the stamping process after they have been made, seeing as the number itself has no bearing on the model.

 

In addition to my previous post, LP Classics often have quilt maple tops, which is a lot rarer on Standards, I do believe.

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Well' date=' Epiphone serial numbers only contain date/location information, as I'm sure you've seen on the GDP.

F 9 7 1 0 0 0 0 8

 

Fine Guitars Korea

1997

October

#0008

 

I would imagine that if Gibson/Epiphone REALLY wanted to, they could check their own records and see exactly what guitar that serial number belonged to.

 

I presume the way they stamp is just to have every guitar go through the stamping process after they have been made, seeing as the number itself has no bearing on the model.

 

In addition to my previous post, LP Classics often have quilt maple tops, which is a lot rarer on Standards, I do believe.

 

Yeah, I looked at the GDP and got that info. It just cracks me up that model/style/finish, etc., isn't associated with S/N. I mean, there are guys here and other places braggin' on wood in tops, sides, bottoms, necks, etc., when it appears that perhaps a dozen models or more are made exactly the same way, with the same materials. I'm not talking about bindings, pups and finishes, just the exact same tree, so to speak, supplying the same wood. Kinda makes me think the original LP "log" could still be in production. You are no doubt absolutely correct that the production line that day could have made say, 50 bodies that went to the finishing process. Final assembly would then have a list of components to install to make whatever model was in play for that particular run.

 

I saw a video of (I think) the Epi/Gibson production line a couple years ago. The process is all computerized up to final assembly. Fascinating. As an old retired Industrial Engineer I was astounded at the way the guitars were built. I'll say one thing for sure - solid body guitars have nowhere the amount of hand detaiing that hollows and semi's do. For the most part a piece of lumber is run through a CNC machine and out comes a body. Another piece of lumber is run through a different computer controlled machine, and out comes a fret board, complete with fret grooves. And so on. Utterly fascinating procedure. BTW, aside from cosmetics, what's the point of gluing plastic binding around the body? [-(

 

Thanks for looking at this. Pretty interesting stuff, huh?

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BTW' date=' aside from cosmetics, what's the point of gluing plastic binding around the body? #-o[/quote']

Well I believe in acoustics it was designed to keep moisture from getting into the top/sides. I don't think it serves any purpose on solid-bodies, those Studios seem to do just fine without it [biggrin]

 

Thanks for looking at this. Pretty interesting stuff' date=' huh?[/quote']

Oh yes, I love making things, and find the majority of production lines to be quite fascinating. Bringing guitars into the mix just adds icing [biggrin]

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