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Oh yea, teles are great. Most of Led Zepplins albums were cut with a tele and a Champ. NOT a Lp and Marshall, that was stage use only.

 

You can get a used MIM from the mid 90s (really the best quality and value) for around $300, best Fender design ever IMO. Even if it isn't routed to take a mini you could DIY or pay a cabinet shop about $20 to route it for you, just download a template for them and bring it in, they should be able to do it while you wait.

 

The Squire may not be total ****, but for the same (or less) as you'd spend on the Squire you can get a real deal MIM Fender Tele. No brainer if you ask me.

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The MIJ Fender Aerodyne Tele had regular Tele bridge setup and a P90 at the neck which should be a direct fit size-wise for a mini-hum. Mexico also had a run of guitars a while back called "Tele Classic" with a full-sized hum in the neck.

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The Squire may not be total yeehaw' date=' but for the same (or less) as you'd spend on the Squire you can get a real deal MIM Fender Tele. No brainer if you ask me.[/quote']

 

Sorry mate, but I don't think you can make those generalisations. I've seen some Squiers that are infinitely preferable to some MIM Fenders.

 

AS90 and I may have had our differences at this forum in the past (such is life), but the guy is right - those Classic Vibes are great guitars. Perhaps you'll tell me that they're made of plywood - but judging by the ones I've played, I'd take a Squier Classic Vibe over a standard MIM Fender Tele any day.

 

Similarly...

 

I own a Fender American Series Telecaster. It's a nice guitar, but from what I've experienced the MIM Baja kicks its arse.

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Sorry mate' date=' but I don't think you can make those generalisations. I've seen some Squiers that are infinitely preferable to some MIM Fenders.

 

AS90 and I may have had our differences at this forum in the past (such is life), but the guy is right - those Classic Vibes are great guitars. Perhaps you'll tell me that they're made of plywood - but judging by the ones I've played, I'd take a Squier Classic Vibe over a standard MIM Fender Tele any day.[/quote']

 

I agree. I've seen folks on TDPRI and FDB that have sold off American made teles after getting Classic Vibe Customs. The Classic Vibe 50s has gotten very good reviews, but the Classic Vibe Custom gets raves. I've heard that both are of absolutely outstanding quality. Almost every MIM I've ever played (and the current MIM 60th I own) have been very good guitars, but all Squiers are not currently created equal.

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I don't have the tele but I DO have the CV Jazz bass. Its a good bass, but has that Squire neck that I always fight. I have upgraded EVERYthing. Badass II bridge, EMG active J pups, bone nut, schaller tuners, all hardware as well. Not bad for the money, but my 95 MIM is miles better.

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I don't have the tele but I DO have the CV Jazz bass. Its a good bass' date=' but has that Squire neck that I always fight. I have upgraded EVERYthing. Badass II bridge, EMG active J pups, bone nut, schaller tuners, all hardware as well. Not bad for the money, but my 95 MIM is miles better.[/quote']

 

I'll tell you why you don't like it. Basswood body. It's a $hitty wood for a guitar, and doubly so for a bass. No matter how much modding you do it still ain't gonna sound good. Unless you put real sterile pickups (EMGs) in it. Then it will sound like every other bass with EMGs.

You want a REAL J-Bass get the Vintage Modified 70's model.It's got a Maple Body. It blows away both my MIM AND MIJ. Both of them are modded. The VM is bone stock.

 

The CV Tele on the other hand is pine like the very first Broadcasters, and the VM is alder. Take your pick of those, just stay away from the CV basses because basswood SUCKS!

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A few things:

 

- The MIM guitar I mentioned before was the MIM Tele Deluxe, not the Tele Classic. There have been a million models called Tele Deluxes but this one pre-dated the MIM Classic Series. It was a 50's-style reissue with a few modern appointments like 9.5 radius, medium jumbos, 6-saddle bridge, and Gibson-style humbucker in the neck.

 

- I have a CV 50's Tele and it is outstanding. I have played a few CV Customs and they have all been universally great as well, although the neck profile doesn't agree with me - it's a little thinner than I like it. But, you can't go wrong with a CV.

 

- with all those things said, I was bopping around TDPRI Classifieds today and saw this. He gives a price for ConUS shipping, not sure if he will go overseas, but you never know:

 

HOMEBREW HB HOT ROD TELE

 

IMG_2443.jpg

 

1) USACG Swamp Ash string thru body

 

2) MIM Maple neck. When I got this neck of ebay, it had fretboard wear on the D string from the 3rd to 5th fret, but hardly any fret wear ( weird ). Anyway, I stipped the neck ( except the Logo and serial number ) added a bit of ReRanch amber tint and refinished in a thin poly coating. This neck has a dent about the size of a pencil eraser on the back of the neck. I could not get it to show in a pic. Neck is dead straight, C radius, modern fretboard radius.

 

3) Wilkinson Vintage Tuners

 

4) Fender Vintage Bridge pup or a Curtis Novak Hand Wound TEL-V bridge pup - YOUR CHOICE!

 

5) Seymour Duncan Mini - Humbucker in the neck

 

6) Fender Ashtray 3 - barrel brass saddle bridge

 

7) 250k tone and 500k volume pots. Fender 3 - way switch.

 

8) Orange Drop cap.

 

9) Smooth textured Graphite Black finish. Finished with a thin skin poly clear coat.

 

9) Guitar is setup, intonated and strung with 10's. It is ready to go.

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My apologies, I was speaking of Vintage Modified and not the Classic Vibe. Mine is maple body, maple fretboard with black blocks and binding. The one you mentioned.

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A lot is said about Fender, 'Fenderish' and 'Fenderesque' and the varying qualities of their Telecasters whether bearing the Squire lable, MIM, Plywood or otherwise, folks like 'em, folks hate 'em!

 

I have a Tele styled guitar - a Gordon Smith Classic T, it differs from the usual Tele look as it is a flamed maple top with a tunamatic style GS bridge, direct mounted controls, 3 PUs and a solid maple neck with John Smith's 'invisible' truss rod.

 

Case is an SKB, very similar in quality to a Hiscox just a little bit cheaper but again, made in the UK as are the Gordon Smiths to a high standard.

 

 

ClassicT02.jpgClassicT01.jpgClassicT03.jpg

 

 

 

I am afraid I cannot subscribe to the school of thought that everybody needs a 'Tele', give me a GS Gemini anytime, it knocks the pants of a Tele!

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I just got a Squier Vintage Modified SSH with HSC and.....

It Kicks ***!!!!!

It has an Indian Red Cedar Body and it sounds wonderful.

It's a 2008. Got it for $182.50 with case.

It's in perfect condition. Not a scratch or ding to be found on it.

 

 

033-1-1.jpg

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I just got a Squier Vintage Modified SSH with HSC and.....

It Kicks ***!!!!!

It has an Indian Red Cedar Body and it sounds wonderful.

It's a 2008. Got it for $182.50 with case.

It's in perfect condition. Not a scratch or ding to be found on it.

 

 

033-1-1.jpg

 

 

Brad that is Beautiful and they have them in Euroguitar are selling those for 2900sek US$400 brand new....Are these as good as the classic vibe?????

 

http://en.euroguitar.com/guitar/squier/telecaster/vintage-modified-ssh/122687.html

 

Because that is exactly what I have been after ready routed...

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The neck isn't as nice.

 

Thanks AS90 and they are different woods and as argued the wood used in the CV Alder maybe truer to the Tele than the Red Cedar...

 

Big thanks to Ricochet for PM'ing this image of the route on the "Classic Vibe" it will take a mini humbucker and given the reviews I am going to go for a "Classic Vibe"

 

ricochet-albums-squier-classic-vibe-50-telecaster-picture5037-img-0567.jpg

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Thanks AS90 and they are different woods and as argued the wood used in the CV Alder maybe truer to the Tele than the Red Cedar...

 

Big thanks to Ricochet for PM'ing this image of the route on the "Classic Vibe" it will take a mini humbucker and given the reviews I am going to go for a "Classic Vibe"

 

 

 

 

The CV is made of pine.

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The CV is made of pine.

 

 

I was just going by Euroguitar's website

 

http://en.euroguitar.com/guitar/squier/classic-vibe/telecaster-custom/129833.html

 

Technical specifications Squier Classic vibe Telecaster Custom :

Alder body

1-piece maple neck

C shape

Rosewood fingerboard

Scale length 25.5" (648mm)

Width at nut 1.625" (41.3mm)

Fingerboard radius 9.5" (241mm)

21 medium jumbo frets

Vintage style tuning machines

2 Custom Vintage style single coil Tele pickups with AlNiCo V magnets

Vintage style strings-thru body tele bridge

3-ply mint green pickguard

Fender Super 25L nickel plated steel strings

Gauges .009 to .042

Chromed hardware

 

and Thomann's

 

FENDER SQUIER CLASSIC VIBE TELECUSTOM

 

http://www.thomann.de/se/fender_squier_classic_vibe_telecustom.htm

 

Fender Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster Custom E-Guitar' date=' Alder Body, Maple Neck, Rosewood Fretboard, Modern C Shape, 21 Medium Frets, Scale 648mm, Nut width 41mm, 2 Custom Single Coils with Alnico V Magnets, Vintage Style Bridge with String thru Body, 3 ply mint green Pickguard, Vintage Style Tuners, 3 way Switch, Finish 3 Color Sunburst

 

this is the one I meant

 

But I think the one Ricochet and AS90 are raving about is this one which is pine

 

http://en.euroguitar.com/guitar/squier/classic-vibe/telecaster-50-s/122983.html

 

Technical specifications Squier Classic vibe Telecaster 50 S vintage blonde :

Body Pine

Neck 1-Piece Maple, Modern “C” Shape,

(Gloss Polyester Finish)

Fingerboard Maple, 9.5" Radius (241mm)

No. of Frets 21 Medium Jumbo Frets

Pickups 2 Custom Vintage Style Single-Coil Tele® Pickups with AlNiCo 3 Magnets (Neck & Bridge)

Controls Master Volume, Master Tone

Pickup Switching 3-Position Blade:

Position 1. Bridge Pickup

Position 2. Bridge and Neck Pickups

Position 3. Neck Pickup

Bridge Vintage Style Strings-Thru-Body Tele Bridge with 3 Brass Barrel Saddles

Machine Heads Vintage Style Tuning Machines

Hardware Chrome

Pickguard 1-Ply Black

Scale Length 25.5” (648 mm)

Width at Nut 1.625” (41.2 mm)

Unique Features “C” Shape Maple Neck,

Knurled Chrome Control Knobs,

Vintage Tinted Neck,

Black Dot Position Inlays,

Gold Squier Logo,

Original Barrel Switch Tip,

Synthetic Bone Nut

 

I am just getting confused with the reviews now.....[biggrin

 

Just need to know which Classic Vibe is the one for me....I presume they are both pre-routed for mini's under the pickguard...so which is the best out of these two and why..?

 

I suppose I take the one closest in spec to this

 

Fender American Vintage '52 Telecaster

 

The Telecaster was first introduced in 1951 with a number of changes made in the 1952 version. The Vintage '52 Tele is one of Fender's American Vintage Series guitars. The original '52 version had an all maple neck (which this guitar has) and the serial number stamped on the ashtray bridge. This guitar has the original style bridge with an 'Ash Tray' cover and three brass saddles. Many guitarists think that the 3 brass model bridges are superior sound wise because there is more pressure holding the string against the body. This is because there are two strings per brass saddle. It's true that it’s a little more difficult to get the intonation correct but it’s very doable.

 

The maple neck has the original 'black dots' as inlay position markers and the silver spaghetti 'Fender' logo (the F is reversed as usual). The truss rod adjustment is found at the bottom end of neck, near the neck pickup. You adjust it using a 'flat headed' Phillips screwdriver. It wasn't until the early 70's that the bullet truss rod adjustment was introduced. The tilt of the neck was only adjustable but placing small pieces of wood (shims) in-between the neck and the body to change the pitch angle. This again was replaced with the bullet truss rod that allowed you to change the pitch of the neck. Also on the original '52 neck there was another neck serial number which was written in pencil next to the Phillips head screw adjustment.

 

The neck is also made of a single piece of maple and has a skunk strip down the back side. It wasn't until the late 50's and early 60's where the neck was made using a separate 'fretboard' which was glued on top of the neck. This allowed the truss rod to be placed inside the neck without the need of routing out the back and having a skunk strip. This guitar has the original style neck with the neck shape being the classic 'U' shape which is thicker than necks found on latter models. Many of the modern day Fenders have a 'C' shaped neck which is considered to be easier to play. The 'U' shape is said to deliver more tone and sustain mainly because there's more of it.

 

The electronics on the '52 tele where somewhat different to that of the earlier version. The normal 3-way pickup selector wasn't introduced until the last 60's which meant that there was no 'both' pickup setting that included a tone control (See next paragraph). This is somewhat significant in that the '52 version has a slightly more 'advanced' pickup selector system than that found previously. The '52 electronics consist of two single coil pickups, a volume control and a tone control. The tone control worked when the selector was in the rear and front settings and not in the middle setting. Fender calls this the 'Vintage Circuit' in that the 3-way pickup selector does select between the pickups but there is no setting where both pickups are on simultaneously. The pickup selector when in the rear (bridge) position turns on the bridge pickup with the tone control working normally. In the Middle position the front (neck) pickup is turned on with the tone control working as you would expect. Now when the pickup selector is placed to the bridge pickup setting the front (neck) pickup is turned on and has a more dark sound. The tone control does nothing.

 

Pickup Switching 3-Position Blade:

 

* Back Position - Bridge Pickup with Normal Tone Control

* Middle Position - Neck Pickup with Normal Tone Control

* Front Position - Neck Pickup with No Tone Control (Dark Vintage Circuit)

 

The guitar also includes a Capacitor and Wiring Diagram which allows you to change the electronics to the more modern pickup selector circuit (but why would you want to do that?). On the earlier versions (before '52) still had two pickups, a 3-way selector switch, a volume control, an in place of the normal tone control there was a balance control. The selector switch when moved to the back position would enable both pickups with the balance (which is now the tone control) control knob controlling the volume of the 'neck' pickup. This allowed you to blend the two or turn down the neck pickup completely. When the pickup selector was in the middle and front positions the 'balance' control did nothing. When the 3-way pickup selector was in the middle position it gave the neck pickup a normal tone and in the neck position gave a bassier tone.

 

The pickups are made using to the same specs and with the same materials as that found on the original. They use Alnico3 magnets with enamel coated wiring. The bridge pickup has the original copper plated steel base plate which gives the pickup more midrange. The neck pickup uses alnic3 magnets as well and is covered with a nickel plated chrome pickup cover. Very vintage looking and sounding.

 

The body is made of premium quality ash and is only available in butterscotch blonde with a nitrocellulose lacquer finish just like the original. The single cut-a-way body shape is to the same dimensions as that on the 1952 version. Over the years apparently the specs/sizes had changed slightly. The pickguard is single-ply and black in color. This is what was used on the earlier Teles. In 1954 the pickguard was changed to white. As mentioned the bridge used is a vintage style bridge.

 

The 25.5 inch scale length neck is made of a single piece of maple and has the classic 'U' shape. Being a single piece of maple it has a maple fretboard and 21 frets with a radius of only 7.25 inches. The Standard version has a radius of 9.5 inches which is slightly more flat. The position markers are black dot again like the original while the machine heads are Gotoh Vintage style tuners.

 

The electronics and pickups are vintage as well. They are made to the same specs as used in 1952. The pickups are American Vintage single coils with the slant rear pickup and the front straight pickup. The 3-way pickup selector was previously described above. It's not your normal switching arrangement.

 

This Telecaster is Fender's longest running guitar which was introduced back in 1951. This is very close to the first models and still has the original tele sound. It includes a tweed hardshell case, strap, ashtray bridge cover, guitar cable, and polishing cloth.

 

 

 

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Joe,

 

Here are some of the differences I have found:

 

Bridge - CV - 3 saddle brass barrel vintage style bridge / VM- 6 saddle vintage style bridge

 

Neck - I think they are the same. Both "C" type, maple 1-piece

 

Fretboard - CV - Vintage Tinted / VM - Not Tinted (both maple)

 

Pickups - CV has regular Squier pups / VM has the Duncan Designed pups.

 

Nut- CV - Synthetic Bone / VM - I don't know what it is on mine.

 

Body - CV- Pine / VM - Indian Red Cedar

 

Control Plate - CV- Regular/Chrome Knobs / VM - Reverse Control plate/Black Knobs

 

Color - CV -Vintage Blonde / VM - Olympic White

 

Generally speaking I think they are both quality guitars. But there are some significant differences.

My biggest problem with the CV is the tinted fretboard and the 3 saddle bridge. I also like the SD designed pups on the VM

Perhaps this can help you decide.

Brad

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Joe' date='

 

Here are some of the differences I have found:

 

[u']Bridge[/u] - CV - 3 saddle brass barrel vintage style bridge / VM- 6 saddle vintage style bridge

 

Neck - I think they are the same. Both "C" type, maple 1-piece

 

Fretboard - CV - Vintage Tinted / VM - Not Tinted (both maple)

 

Pickups - CV has regular Squier pups / VM has the Duncan Designed pups.

 

Nut- CV - Synthetic Bone / VM - I don't know what it is on mine.

 

Body - CV- Pine / VM - Indian Red Cedar

 

Control Plate - CV- Regular/Chrome Knobs / VM - Reverse Control plate/Black Knobs

 

Color - CV -Vintage Blonde / VM - Olympic White

 

Generally speaking I think they are both quality guitars. But there are some significant differences.

My biggest problem with the CV is the tinted fretboard and the 3 saddle bridge. I also like the SD designed pups on the VM

Perhaps this can help you decide.

Brad

 

Brad thanks man.....there is no doubt they are both fine guitars but what is swinging me in the direction of the

 

Squier Classic vibe Telecaster 50 S vintage blonde

 

is I like the fact I can have the guitar as is with the alnico 3 pups and then with a new pickguard I can experiemnt with those 5 or so mini's I want to A/B

 

I have a lot of excellent options there seem to be a lot of well priced very nice Teles out there at the moment.

 

Any one of those 3 well priced well performing guitars word do the job for me....

 

Really enjoyed this thread I have learned so much....Thanks guys

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Brad thanks man.....there is no doubt they are both fine guitars but what is swinging me in the direction of the

 

Squier Classic vibe Telecaster 50 S vintage blonde

 

is I like the fact I can have the guitar as is with the alnico 3 pups and then with a new pickguard I can experiemnt with those 5 or so mini's I want to A/B

 

I have a lot of excellent options there seem to be a lot of well priced very nice Teles out there at the moment.

 

Any one of those 3 well priced well performing guitars word do the job for me....

 

Really enjoyed this thread I have learned so much....Thanks guys

 

You're welcome Joe.

I think the CV will do you just fine.

Look forward to seeing whatever you get, and what you do with it. :-$

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Very COOL! Joe!!

I wish they had showed Steve more.

More than the bass players face. lol

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I have a CV 50's Tele and it's a great guitar. If it hasn't already been discussed here, the Alnico III pickups in the CV 50's are made by Tonerider (though it's sort of a wink wink, nudge nudge "secret.".

 

The neck profile on the CV Tele Custom is noticeably slimmer than the 50's which is how Fender tends to treat models from those eras. Quality is about equal on both.

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