Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
pohatu771

Not a bad project for someone

Recommended Posts

http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-EPIPHONE-FT-90-ELDORADO-365452-NO-RESERVE-/110559525009?cmd=ViewItem&pt=Guitar&hash=item19bddc7891

 

1965 Epiphone El Dorado... stripped. It seems to be in decent condition... for $100 and the cost of parts and finish, you could have a nice Kalamazoo-made Epiphone. If I had extra money I'd buy it and do it myself, but any guitars I buy at the moment need to be fully functional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know for sure but that doesn't look like the correct headstock and the S/N should be in the 225000 range shouldn't it?.............J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The headstock looks just like the Texan headstock, and the serial number resulted in 1965 from Guitar Dater Project, as an Epiphone and as a Gibson.

 

Page 3 of the Gibson Serial Number Guide here shows a range including that number for 1965 (top right column).

 

The 1964 catalog shows the El Dorado with that headstock and an oversized pickguard, but the 1966 catalog shows it with a Texan-style pickguard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info. I was thinking that 'most' of the headstocks at that time were pretty much the same for all the acoustics. I just posted a pic of my '65 Cortez, S/N 225200 in another post and thought that the El Dorado would have been in the same ballpark.........J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I completely forgot that I have a 1965 Gibson sitting feet away - the serial is in the 362000 range.

 

I'd like to see production numbers on how many guitars came out of Kalamazoo that year. The serial numbers were spread across all products and brands, I believe.

 

The most expesive part of the restoration would be getting an original two-hole truss rod cover. They sell for quite a bit on the rare occasion they appear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aha.... Maybe my '65 lower S/N starting at 225 indicates the lower end of the guitars made then. I think brand new this one was about $110 retail and included a brown 'cardboard' type case which I discarded quite awhile back.........J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to see production numbers on how many guitars came out of Kalamazoo that year. The serial numbers were spread across all products and brands' date=' I believe.

[/quote']

 

1965 marks the beginning of the downward sprial for Gibson. That is the year the bean counters took over CMI, expanded the plant, and forced guys like Ted McCarty out. There was a new emphasis on putting out more and more guitars while cutting costs so you got things like high speed conyeor belt finishing lines and new automatic neck machines which not only turned out a slimmer and shallower neck but reduced the headstock angle to 14 degrees.

 

The problem with getting into a project like this is that so much original stuff is gone and even assuming the neck is good when all is said and done you might have a good player but will have a guitar probably worth 60% or so less than what one in good original condition will bring. So if you put in the time, effort and money, you had better like the results. And that you will not know until you have got it all done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I've convinced myself to put a bid on it. Nothing huge, but an "I'll regret it if I don't bid" amount.

 

There's a piece missing from the rosette (I asked the seller). As far as I can tell, it will cost me a new bridge, a set of tuners, and a bit of finish. I need something to do all winter.

 

I like the post-65 skinny necks. I have two already, after all.

 

[EDIT] Never mind. It's gone higher than I'm willing to pay at this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a better candidate for a project up on eBay now - a ca. 1953 FT-79. If that guitar was just a little older and made before Conn purchased Epi and shifted production to Philly (although the labels still said New York) I might jump on it myself but I already have a Philly-made FT-79.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zomby do you have a listing I can't find it.ship

 

I am digitally challenged and don't know how to link but just go into eBay and type in Epiphone FT-79. I was looking for parts (I need a pickguard) and that is how I stumbled across the guitar.

 

These old FT-79s are selling for stupid money in good original condition. Pre-Philly made FT-79s can hit $3,500. The Philly FT-79s usually go for about $1,000 less. The logos, woods and board markers on the '53 to '55 guitars will vary so if you do some reasearch on originality keep that in mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

are you talking about this one Zomby.

http://cgi.ebay.com/1963-Epiphone-Texan-/130412102546?cmd=ViewItem&pt=Guitar&hash=item1e5d2ac392

Ship

or there is this one,yuk. http://cgi.ebay.com/1968-EPIPHONE-Texan-Special-Order-guitar-/370223298796?cmd=ViewItem&pt=Guitar&hash=item56330738ec

Or you canhave this, no really because I wouldn't dare pay what they are asking for a Cortez in sub average condition. http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-1960s-Acoustic-EPIPHONE-FT45N-CORTEZ-GUITAR-/220633357925?cmd=ViewItem&pt=Guitar&hash=item335ec5de65

Why is it when they have something older they think they can get what ever they want for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yowzaah that guy with the Cortez ain't bashful about his asking price.

 

The Epi I was referring ot is a pre-Gibson FT-79.

 

It is item # 370410431143

 

ByWv5gBmkKGrHqEOKj0EwOYbW1eBMRbsyF6U_3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool how they had a number stamped in the back of the head stock and also had the paper label, lets see if any of you know why they also included the label inside the guitar and why the numbers don't match?????? anyone, anyone Buller, Buller.ship

A nice project guitar but would suck if it does indeed need a neck re-set, I wouldn't be a bit surprised if this goes out of the roof, these dont come up on the market to often and is in pretty decent shape to fix back up and it was part of the new jumbo body shapes from that time of 53.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is a better candidate for a project up on eBay now - a ca. 1953 FT-79. If that guitar was just a little older and made before Conn purchased Epi and shifted production to Philly (although the labels still said New York) I might jump on it myself but I already have a Philly-made FT-79.

 

So Zomby, what`s your Philly made Ft-79 Like, in terms of tone and playability?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So Zomby' date=' what`s your Philly made Ft-79 Like, in terms of tone and playability?

 

[/quote']

 

 

Playability on mine is great but I love the chunky V neck.

 

I have never been real good at describing sound. First, I am assuming Epiphone was just phoning it in the last couple of years and putting together guitars with whatever they had around. The 1953-55 FT-79s I have seen vary in woods, logos and even board inlays. I am also assuming these were not the best of the breed as Epiphone lost much of its workforce when they made the move to Philly.

 

The guitar though has a nice warmth in the lower end but sure don't power out the bass notes like a Martin D-28. The upper end is not bright sounding but has a round, fat sound to it. It is loud though - darn near keeps up with my mid-1950s Gibson SJ. But to be honest, if I had $3,000 to lay out on a guitar this one (assuming in was in fine original condition) would probably not make the cut. But in abused condition and less than the price of a new Masterbilt it was a steal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Playability on mine is great but I love the chunky V neck.

 

I have never been real good at describing sound. First' date=' I am assuming Epiphone was just phoning it in the last couple of years and putting together guitars with whatever they had around. The 1953-55 FT-79s I have seen vary in woods, logos and even board inlays. I am also assuming these were not the best of the breed as Epiphone lost much of its workforce when they made the move to Philly.

 

The guitar though has a nice warmth in the lower end but sure don't power out the bass notes like a Martin D-28. The upper end is not bright sounding but has a round, fat sound to it. It is loud though - darn near keeps up with my mid-1950s Gibson SJ. But to be honest, if I had $3,000 to lay out on a guitar this one (assuming in was in fine original condition) would probably not make the cut. But in abused condition and less than the price of a new Masterbilt it was a steal. [/quote']

 

Thanks for that, I love V necks myself, and both of my Handcrafted Yamaha`s have a deep V at the top of the neck, which then gradually becomes a medium C as you venture further up. I might be tempted to bid on this one!

 

Steve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this site :

 

http://www.vintageguitars.org.uk/epiphoneIndex.php

 

especially helpful in identifying by physical features of the waning years of Kalamazoo Epis. Scroll about half way down there are 4 catalogs you can view. The headstock appears to be most similar to the 1966 Eldo. It also appears the wings on the headstock on the subject guitar has been heavily chamfered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...