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Andrew McCormack

1985 Steinberger Hardtail

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Would any one know of the value of a 1985 hardtail steinberger ser#1743

I'm not wishing to sell ' date=' just looking for some info on value .[/quote']

Mint ?

Assuming 9.5+ condition 100% original with case $5000 and rising.

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Ok, that is what I thought. Ed Roman said an original might be much more valuable that $300 (thousands to a collector), but I couldn't imagine as I got it used for about $120. It is in good condition, using it on a headless I built, the only thing I would consider is upgrading the tuners: they turn, but sometimes the knobs come off the screws, etc.

 

Also, I dont think it has original saddles and the screw on the side to keep the saddles from moving seems to have been upgraded from the original.

(this information was sent to me from Don Greenwald who showed the pictures to Jeff Babicz).

 

So this would be closer to the $200-300 dollar range?

 

The question is whether the sound quality is worth the value of this as a "vintage." Should I keep it and put it on a guitar, or sell it and get a JCustom??

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That considered $120 is about right. You should still keep it as it is the best sounding Steinberger bridge to date and your tuner issue is just loose grub screws. I would disassemble it clean it and rebuild properly lubed and working as it should . PS If Ed Roman wants to pay you stupid money (which he won't ) sell it to him.

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Thanks Eagle,

As for the tuner, they are working perfectly, but one of the screw is a couple mm shorter than the others. The screws on this seem to be attached to the Claw rather than the knob. I am working with a Luthier (Paul from Fret Song) who may build me a body for some of the parts I have collected and he wants to use this, says it will only go up in value. He said it ought to sound great, the JCustom will sound good too: I will hear the bridge more with the heavy steiny and the body-wood more with the lighter jcustom.

 

I have also been in touch with Jon Bondy who thinks it may be valuable and waiting to hear back from Andy Yakubic (yahoo group forum), but I suspect you are right that it is more valuable as a guitar part to me.

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I have a GL2 with the first version and it is by far the best sounding Steinberger Ive ever played . The other really great bridge is a unmodified TT type 1 all the rest are made out of crap err sintered zinc (not even liquid cast) and sound numb by comparison. The Bondy is milled from aluminium so it should sound nice as well .

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… all the rest are made out of crap …

 

Considering the fact that the vast majority of Steinie users worldwide plays and enjoys this "crap", this is a pretty snobbish attitude. Congratulations to whatever you might own, but this is not the standard. I don't quite understand your motivation to devaluate what others might appreciate... other than to upvalue what you have got. Yes, I've read all the material discussions (whereever they happened), and yes, everybody wants milled steel with platinum plated Steinberger logos, because no guitar can sound good without…

 

Bernd

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Thanks Eagle, your info has been very helpful. I will go with your advice and put the vintage on a FretSong body, I think that ought to sound great with my moses and Joe Barden pups. I have only heard great things about the Bondy, but I thought he stopped making them - to expensive compared to the jcustom.

 

Be.eM, I have heard both opinions that old is better and that new is just as good. Some argue that it is an emotional preference to the old. Others argue that it is a financial bias, if you pay more, it must be better. In the end, people seem to like the old more. Tim Small ("refurbishes" Steinys, sells on ebay) sent me a document comparing all of these points that people argue and the authors suggests that there is no difference, however he doesn't discuss the steel brick of a bridge to the new zinc. Apparently the zinc is more likely to break in the least, which effects the value. But there has to be a tonal difference between 2lbs of steel and 1lbs of zinc alloy.

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Apparently the zinc is more likely to break in the least' date=' which effects the value. But there has to be a tonal difference between 2lbs of steel and 1lbs of zinc alloy. [/quote']

 

Jon,

 

yes, there must be a difference. Without thinking about the impact on the tonal range that could be the result (Steinies are considered sounding "cold" anyway, being equipped with EMGs and composite necks/bodies), I ask myself why they don't build those crappy and always breaking SG headstocks out of steel then… [wink]

 

Bernd

 

P.S.: I've got 5 (soon: 6) guitars with a "crappy" TT, one for almost 20 years now. Still waiting for the first one to break. I must have been lucky [biggrin]

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Hey Bernd - Didn't realize Be.eM was you!

 

I have heard the TT's and S-Trems last no matter what version, but I have been told that you can expect to repair or replace an R-Trem in 4-5 years.

 

Yea, seems some people like the "cold" sound and a lot of steiny players use significant amounts of distortion, which may make that okay. I prefer to switch out the EMGs. So to avoid the "coldness" I may go for a custom fretsong with swamp ash and possibly a figured maple top, Barden pups, the bridge we discussed above and a moses graphite (which is designed to me more like wood I guess than other composite brands). I think the swamp ash may balance the tone a bit. Paul just suggested that I switch the saddles for the Hohner saddles, which have slightly better sustain, so anyone gotta set??

 

Also, per the bridge discussed above, Paul said the saddles are likely Gibson made, fairly rare, used to change the string spacing (ie to use a steiny bridge with a fender neck). Kinda cool I think.

 

~Congrats on picking up another "not crappy" TT Bernd [biggrin]

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Hey Bernd - Didn't realize Be.eM was you!

 

Yep' date=' it's me. I always was… [biggrin

 

Paul just suggested that I switch the saddles for the Hohner saddles' date=' which have slightly better sustain, so anyone gotta set?? [/quote']

 

I just answered your mail from the SW list.

 

Also' date=' per the bridge discussed above, Paul said the saddles are likely Gibson made, fairly rare, used to change the string spacing (ie to use a steiny bridge with a fender neck). Kinda cool I think.[/quote']

 

Yes, those saddles have been used on Spirits and Gibson guitars (KB Trem), and the "Hohner style" saddles with all other licensees of the R-Trem, like Epiphone, Hohner, Cort. But changing the string spacing is not possible with all of them. All I had in my hands until now had an equal spacing, centred on the saddles. I've seen photos of saddles, which were built asymmetrically (the steel insert, not the saddle), thus widening the string spacing.

 

~Congrats on picking up another "not crappy" TT Bernd :)

 

Oh' date=' thanks, it comes attached to a custom-built GS [wink

 

Bernd

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